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The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, July 19, 1918, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1918-07-19/ed-1/seq-6/

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The Man Who
Knows How
>>
Latest Colors
in
Auto Painting
WALLISE
PAINTS THEM
Old Curtis Building
Back of Commer
cial Hotel
Phone 278-w
BLACKFOOT
Own Your Home
I
SEE QUILLIN
Telephone 389
DOLAN'S TRANSFER
AND EXPRESS
General transfer to all parts of city
and country,
handled.
Stand Bond's Warehouse, Phone 108
Freight promptly
•%
PHONE 138
Graduate P. S. C. Phone: Office 400
Member U. C. A.
CLAIRBEL SICKERT, D. C.
CHIROPRACTOR
Hopkins Building
Hours—10 to 12 a.m.
Res. 388J
2 to 6 p.m
SPINAL ANALYSIS FREE
Highest Cash Prices
— FOR—
HIDES, PELTS, CLEAN RUBBER
BOOTS ANI) SHOES
SAVE YOUR RAGS AND JUNK AND
CALL 237
Branch of Great, Western Hide Co
M. VOLPERT Mgr.
BLACKFOOT, IDA
Bridge St.
Shoe Repairing
Home made harness. Fishing
tackle and fishing licenses
All work strictly guaranteed.
Blacfefoot Harness Shop
Leo Henish
DRS. RICHARDS & VON HARTEN
&
EYE-Sli
a
OrAft Richards
OrAEVttnHarten
Blackfoot. Idaho
Eyes tested. Remedies for weak
or defective eyes. Offices over Palace
Drug store, Blackfoot, Idaho.
adv.
BLACKFOOT CAMP NO 693
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Meet first and third Fridays in each
month at I. O. O. F. hall at 8 p. m
Visiting neighbors are cordially in
vited to attend.
J. J. QUILLIN, C. C.,
JOHN H. BOND, Clerk
ROYAL NEIGHBORS
Meet the second and fourth Wed
nesdays.of each month. I. 0. O. F
hall, No. 60 W. Bridge street.
GRACE FAULCONER, Oracle.
JENNIE ROSSITER, Recorder.
his
He
the
up
W. A. BEAKLEY
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
Practice in All Courts
Rooms 1 and 2 Eccles Bldg.
Office Phone 163
BLACK
LOSSES SURELY PREVENTED
by CUTTER'S BLACKLEG PILLS
preferred by
western stock* ^
men, because they f JnT4Rt>»
protect where other
vaccines fall. ft®Kl
Write lor booklet and testimonials. LJm
10-doss pkg.Blacklag Plllt, 11.00 UEw
SO-dsts pkg. Blackleg Pills, $4.00 *
Use any Injector, but Cutter's simplest and strongest.
superiority of Cutter products Is
years of specializing in VACCINES
only. Insist on Cutter's. If unobtainable,
order direct
LEG
due to over 15
AND SERUMS
The
TIN Cnttar Laboratory, Barkalay, California
Our mon in the trenches and in
the submarine chasers are doing
their part. Are you doing your pert?
Buy war savings stamps to your ut
most capacity.
Australian Veteran Coaches
. i «.
Impetuous Yankee Soldier!
WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN
PRANCE.—"Hey, Yankee, take it a
bit easy and wait for me. You ain't
running no bloddy 100-yard dash,
you know."
The speaker was a giant Austral-1
ian, loose of limb and with face
bronzed by years of constant expos
ure to the sun. His companion was |
equally sturdy, Jiis brawn acquired
on his father's farm in a far western
state. It was dawn of July 4, and
these two, with many others from
Australia and America, were just
pushing out across the still mist-1
shrouded field that stretched away
along the Somme valley toward the |
strongholds of the Germans, whom
they were that day to vanquish in J
the first Anglo-American attack of |
Just ahead of them was a curtain |
of breaking shells from hundreds of |
British guns in the rear, and the
Yankees were having their initial ex-1
AMERICAN BOY
JOURNEYS INTO
LAND OF DEATH
in First Battle; Finds Apt
Pupil in Grim Work.
history.
perience with a barrage fire.
"That barrige," continued the
Australian as he cleared a shell hole I
with a flying leap, landing beside his
companion, " that barrage ain't no
blinging bar to be leaned against,
youngster." O ff on their right other
men from the United States were |
eagerly pressing forward with rifles
grasped tensley and faces expectant,
Out ahead there somewher| they
were to have their initiation into real
warfare. They did not know exactly
what it would be like, but they were
running to it with an impetuous dis
regard for the death that might be |
waiting for them.
Suddenly, one boy who had pushed |
ahead of the others, staggered back
clutching at one arm which hung
helpless by his side. "I was just
telling you so!" muttered the Aus
stam
mered the other with a catch in his
voice. It was the first time he had
ever seen a man hit in battle and
this was one of his own pals. "Too
bad, but those things happen," re
marked the veteran, tersely, "he can
be glad he ain't dead. You fellows
have got to learn not to charge'into
a barrage. It don't help to lick the
boche. I know how you feel—you
want to get-at 'em, but there's time, |
old sgn, there's time for it."
The Amrican fell in beside the |
Australian and pushed ahead
thoughtfully. He had had his first
vital lesson in warfare as it is waged
todav. He must not let his eager
ness carry him ahead too fast so that
he would get caught in that crashing
line of steel. Tom had just learned
by burning his fingers that fire was'
hot and other American boys were
getting the same hard fact driven |
home to tliemf strange as it might
His Pal is Wounded
tralion to his companion.
"Why—wey, it's Tom!'
seem, that there was such a thing as |
too much speed in rushing the
enemy.
Into Storm of Bullets
The Australian and the American
pushed forward thru the lightning
gloom. From somewhere far ahead
the erman machine guns began their
barking and bullets came singing.
The western boy ducked sharply as
a screaming pellet swished past his
ear. "You dodged that one all
right, good work, Yank, good work,"
the veteran said with a grin: "You
fellows are mighty quick."
The American blushed under his
tan and smiled ruefully, "Oh, we
are good, all right, Shorty!" he re
plied thru clenched teeth.
The bullets kept coming in waves,
but the American did not dodge
*
On they went down the sheil-torn I
again.
slope that led to the Hamel wood.
They had encountered no enemy as |
yet, but they were in the zone of
barbed wire and that tore their legs
cruelly at times as they pushed
thru the network of sharp spikes,
Then came the first erman trench
defence and in a runway were sev
eral gray coats firing with rifles at |
the advancing troops.
"Hit them, Yank! at g!" yelled I
the Australian, and he hurled him- |
There was no necessity to urge the |
Yankee. He was down among the
ermans like a wliilwind, and then
there began a furious lunging and
parrying with the bayonets. There |
were four Germans in that pit, great
strapping fellows with plenty of
fight in them. The American was
in a battle rage and he fought fur- |
lously, but with the same headwork
that characterized his veteran com
rade's methods. It was all over in |
a moment and the enemy lay crum
self over the parapet.
pled in the ditch. The American had
accounted for two of them; he had
held his own.
Good fellow, \ank, you certainly
can fight!" the Australian said, "but
hell man, don't never stab another
boche thru the chest. You'll bust
your steel and there'll be the devil
in J* 16 throat!"
Out of the Hamel wood the Ger
mans were maintaining a wicked fire
from their machine guns, but there
was no slackening of the advance of
the Australian or the American.
They surged forward with heads
down and teeth set.
Silencing Machine Gun
Just a little distance ahead was a
machine gun nest and a bullet from
that direction grazed the American's
cheek. It angered him. He had had
his baptism of fire; he had killed,
and now there was no stopping him.
He deliberately charged the nest
and hurled a bomb among the gray
coats. Another and still another
hand grenade went spinning into
the midst of the enemy with the
precision of abaseball thrown by an
expert. Little spouts of earth shot
up and the rapid flrer was silenced.
Two Germans appeared from the
nearby cover with their hands held
high. "Kamerade!" they cried.
The American whirled and fixed
his bayonet.
"No, Yank, no!" the Australian
shouted. "The blighters are trying
to surrender. Let 'em alone. We
will turn 'em o^ftr to be sent back.
Pretty creatures, ain't they, these
cussed sausage eaters!"
Battles Gallantly and Grimley
So the allied pair continued on
I thelr adventurous journey, and the
story of the early moments of their
fighting was the same as that at
the end. They fought gallantly and
grimly, side by side; they killed and
they also took prisoners, and al
ways the American boy did his share
of the bitter work. It was his first
| journey into the land of death v but
| he did not flinch. They reached
their objective a mile and a half
from the starting point, and on their
| right and left their comrades were
holding positions which they, too,
| had torn from the enemy,
| tralian asserted as he wiped the
sweat from his brow and leaned
against the breastwork,
manded. Why don't we continue.
We could get ahead easily now.
We've got the boche on the run."
| Australian replied as he stared
speculatively toward the east, "but
J Haig told me, personally, yesterday
| that he wanted me to stay right here.
Me and Haig had quite a talk about
| It, and his idea was that if we went
| any further we might catch the
Spanish influenza that the boches
have got. So we better linger here
for awhile, I reckon."
"All right," the Yankee said, dis
"This is where we rest," the Aus
"But why?" the American de
"I know, Yank, so we could," the
I appointedly.
HOUSING IN WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, D. C. July 18,
| 1918.—The United States civil ser
vice commission announces that it
is now in a position to state defiitely
to the public that steps will be taken
at once to relieve the congested liv
ing conditions in Washington, which
have been an obstacle in the way of
recruiting the civil service to meet
| war needs,
The commission is ad
vised by the department of labor that
the erection of temporary hotels and
| restaurants, to be conducted under
government supervision for the use
of federal employees in Washington,
will begin at once,
It is expected that the first units
will be ready for occupancy early
in September. Accomdations will
first be provided for approximately
5000 persons. Additional accomda
tions will be provided as they are
needed. Each room will be arranged
for the ocupancy of but one persoih
In the meantime, the room registra
tion office, which is conducted by the
District of Columbia council of de
fense under the auspices of the coun
cil of national defense, is able to pro
vide rooming and boarding accomda
latest report the room registration
office had on its lists more than
5000 which had been inspected and
found available for government em
ployees.
Those who arrive on late trains
may find accommodations for the
night by applying at the booth of the
district council of defense, which is
prominently situated in the Union
station, where all trains arrive,
tions for the new appointees. At the
wss
DRAFT EVADERS
FTGHT TO DEATH
Chauffeur and two Deserters Die In
Battle Between Officers and
Conscriptionists
LITTLE ROCK, Ark.—Three per
sons were killed July 7 in two
as I pitched battles between officers and
a band of twenty-five or more alleged
deserters and their supporters in a
woods eight miles west of Heber
| Springs, Ark. Camp Pike has been
I the man hunt,
1 a chauffeur; Tom Atkinson, aged
| on the morning of July 7 at the At
* kinson home, where it is alleged,
I draft resisters have been harbored.
Sheriff K. W. Duke of Cleburne
asked to furnish soldiers to aid in
The dead are Porter Hazelwood
fifty-five and his son aged eighteen.
The first fight took place early
| county had received information ser
oral men at the house were wanted
for failure to report. His deputies
surrounded the house and then called
to those within to come out and sur
render. A volley of shots was the
reply. Hazelwood fell dead. About
| noon the sheriff led a second attack
I in the house opened fire. The posse
| men returned the fire and Atkinson
and his young son were killed. Fol
| lowing the fall of the Atkinsons the
band dispersed. Governor Brough
arranged for the sendiing of fifty
soldiers from Camp Pike, armed with
| machine guns,
| God gave my son in trust to
Christ died for him.
a man for Christ,
| And God's and
upon the Atkinson place. The men
THE MOTHER'S ANSWER
me.
He should be
He is his own
man's, not mine
alone.
He was not mine to give,
Himself, that he might help'to save
^11 that a Christian should revere,
All that enlightened men hold dear,
"To feed the guns." Ah! torpid soul,
Awake, and see life as a whole,
When freedom, honor, justice, right,
Were threatened by the despot's
might,
He bravely went for God, to fight
Against base savages, whose pride
He gave
of
in
ing
in
in
the
the
The laws of God and man defied;
Who slew the mother and the child;
Who maidens, pure and sweet, de
filed;
He did not go to feed the guns.
He went to save from ruthless Huns
His home and country, and to be
A guardian of democracy.
"What if he does not come? 1
say;
Well, then, my sky will be more gray.
But thru the clouds the sun will
shine
And vital memories be mine.
God's test of manhood is, I know,
Not, will he come—but did he go?
—Northwestern Christian Advocate.
When you buy war savings stamps
you do not give—you rooelve.
you
DRAFT LAW
MODIFIED IN
NEW ORDERS
Managers of Theatres, Musi
cians and Skilled Persons
Eliminated from Work or
Fight Program.
Managers of motion theatre
houses or other places of amuse
ment, musicians employed therein,
skilled persons who are necessary to
productions and performances in
such places, do not come under the
province of the work or fight order
and is given a deferred classifica
tion, may claim the right to remain
there.
This is the ruling theProvost Mar
shal General Crowder has transmit
ted to Adjutant General Moody and
by him sent broadcast to the various
city ad county draft boards. The
notice issued is in the following
form: -
Order Received
"To all boards: The following
telegram from the provost marshal
is quoted for your iformation and
guidance:
"'No. B-1835, subdivision C of
section 821-K, selective service reg
ulations, is hereby amended as fol
lows: Persons, including ushers and
other attendants, engaged and oc
cupied in and in connection with
games, sports and amusements, ex
cepting owners and managers, actual
performers including musicians iin
legitimate concerts, operas, motion
pictures or theatrical performances
and the skilled persons who
necessary to such productions, pre
formances or presentations.
" 'Section 121-K relates to and
contains the regulations for non
productive occupations or employ
ment of men within the draft age.
As it originally stood it did not ex
empt under the "work or fight" pro
vision owners and managers, musi
cians and skilled persons necessary
to the production of moving pictures.
The modifications of the original
order means that those enumerated
in the order may claim the right of
deferment from call."
There are 265 motion picture
theatres in the state of Idaho employ
ing two or more persons. The order
quoted above will, it is claimed, ex
empt from service and permit a de
ferred classification to many of
these employes, especially those di
rectly engaged as skilled labor for
the production or presentation of
the shows. The draft is said to have
been a. heavy drain on the theatres
having taken away from the motion
picture operators valuable and skilled
help.
are
is
wss
BIG GRAIN CROP SURE -
FOR UNITED STATES
Reports Received at Chicago
Indicate Abundant Yield of
Wheat in the Middle West,
Far West and Canada.
In
CHICAGO.—Despite scattered re
ports of light yields and fears of la
bor shortage it was believed July
10 its 1918 wheat crop is sufficient
to cause apprehension in Berlin.
From the middle west came reports
that half the wheat has been cut.
A record Kansas farm boasts a yield
of forty-nine bushels to the acre and
the state's per acre average, it is
claimed will be between twenty and
twenty-eight bushels, Nebraska, split
in half by the Platte river has fin
ished the harvest on the south side.
The grain is just beginning to top
ple before the sickle in the northern
half. The Ne braska yield is uneven,
top being thirty-five bushels.
The northwestern wheat states re
port crop conditions good. If there
is a shortage it will be labor, not
wheat. Over the line in Canada
there had been fear of a short crop
due to lack of rain. Now Manitoba
and Saskatchewan expect the best
crop in three years.
Canadian Crop
The western Canadian contribu
tion to the "victory crop" is esti
mated at 275,000,000 bushels. The
car shortage of last year is not ex
pected to be repeated this year.
Grain cars numbering 4000 are being
held at sidings in the grain belt
ready to begin movement when
threshing is completed.
Thirty per cent of the winter
wheat crop has been harvested in
Iowa with an average yield of 15.25
bushels per acre. Slow and uneven
ripening is blamed for the compara
tively light yield.
Harvesting of oats in Iowa will
begin next week, with estimates of
an average per acre yield of twenty
bushels. Corn in Iowa is three weeks
ahead of recent years and already is
"tasseled" in some sections of the
state.
a
-wss
KAISER CLAIMS PROGS AS ALLY
AMSTERDAM.—Karl Rosner,
newspaper correspondent, frequently
termed-the German Emperor's press
agent, descrbles In the Lokal An
zeiger a conversation which he says
took place between the Emperor and
the Crown Prince, In which the son
told his father the story of "the frogs
of the battle of Chemin des Dames."
The story was told, says Rosener, as
the father and son stood on a hill
in the battle sector of the army
group of General von Francois on
June 3. The crown prince said: "It
was when the Germans were prepar
ing to storm Chemin des Dames, that
frogs which were found in millions
in the marshy Allette region, croaked
in such a deafening fasholn that they
enabled the Germans to bring up
their battries and ammunition col
umns without discovery and when
the attack was actually launched the
deafening concert of frogs prevented
the enemy from discovering the posi
tions of the erman machine guns.
a
THE
National Bank
First
OF FIRTH
Now Open For Business
Capital Stock $25,000
$ 2,500
Surplus
OFFICERS
Alex Younie, President
E. M. Kennedy, Vice President
F. H. Kubicek, Cashier
We Solicit Your Account
FIRTH
IDAHO
W P——■
i
«
FISK CORD TIRES
You want size—strength,
safety, beauty and mileage
in a tire. That's what you
get in the Fisk Cord. All
that, plus most unusual re
siliency,speed,comfortand
luxury—Made in Ribbed
Tread and the famous Fisk
Non-Skid.
a
BILLS AUTO CO.
BLACKFOOT
IDAHO
*
Uj be
White Star
GARAGE
We are now in position to give you guaran
teed satisfactory
EXPERT REPAIR WORK
and solicit your business,
specialty of welding and
feet repairs on bent
We make a
can give you per
or broken axles, etc.
Let us serve you—we know how.
GASOLINE
and OIL
Service Station
Crouch & Grimmett, Props.
Moreland
Idaho
»

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