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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, October 18, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1918-10-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN—THE LOAN
THAT MADE BINGHAM COUNTY FAMOUS
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OFFICIAL PAPER OF CITY AND COUNTY
BLACKFOOT, BINGHAM COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1918
Vol. XV. No. 14
$3 a Year
HUN BASE CAPTURED
BY FORCES OF ALLIES
City of Thourout Taken
From Germans, and
the Fall of Courtrai is
Soon Expected.
BRITISHOCCUPY
TRIPOLI AND HOMS
LONDON, >Oct. 16.—The Belgian
city of Thourout has been captured
by the allied forces in their Flanders
offensive. The fall of Courtrai is
imminent.
Thorout is a big German base in
Flanders.
British patrols entered the south
western suburbs of Lille this morn
ing.
Many Signs Show Germans Planning
Further Retreat
WITH THE ALLIED ARMIES IN
BELGIUM, Oct.
many signs that the Germans are
planning a further withdrawal on
this sector. Gfeat streams of enemy
traffic began moving last night and
continue^ today on the roads around
Courtrai and Harlebecke and on the
railways running northeast.
Trench mortrars and direct ma
chine gyn fire are seriously hamper
ing the enemy transport. The Ger
man withdrawal continues in the
Lille sector, but slowiyj
In the southern battle area there
lias been fighting of a minor charac
ter. Mor^jpivillans have been res
cued from towns especially from
Hussy.
16. — There are
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SPECIAL PRICES ON NAILS IN KEG LOTS
2 D Fine.
4 D Common .
6 D Common .
12 D Common ...
16 D Common .
20 D Common ...
30 D Common ...
50 D Common ...
80 D Common ...
4 D Smooth Box
6 D Smooth Box .
7 D Smooth Box .
4 D Bhrb Box ...
5 D Barb Box ...
6 D Barb Box ...
3 D Barb Box ....
4 D Barb Box ...
6 D Barb Box ....
8 D Barb Box ....
10 D Barb Box ..
6 D Caselng ___
2 D Sterelized Blued Lath.
7-8 inch Barb Roof.
1 inch Barb Roof .
1% inch Barb Roof.
1 inch Barb Roof .
2 inch Barb Roof.
10 D Caselng at $4.00 per keg
Woven wire anji posts. We have a complete line and prices that
are right. Thirty inch K style 50 cents per rod and other wire in
proportion.
at $5.50
Base
per Keg
-y
at $6.50
per Keg
NEIL F. BOYLE HARDWARE COMPANY
CLEAN-UP SALE
ON PAINTS
Per Cent Off
Your chance to paint up at little cost.
This discount good until November I only.
We have decided to clean up on our paint stock and will sell
entire line at one-half off. Your chance to save $2.25 per gallon
guaranteed paint.
i
our
on
Berryman's Hardware
/
/
STATE-WIDE FARM
BUREAU CAMPAIGN
. It is planned to conduct a state
wide campaign for the reerganiza
tion of every farm bureau In Idaho,
immediately after Thanksgiving and
closing not later than December 15.
This campaign will be given state
wide publicity and workers outside
of the extension force will be en
listed to carry the farm bureau mes
sage throughout the state.
United States government will at
the same time conduct a nation-wide
campaign to develop interest in a
nation-wide agricultural war pro
gram.
The state-wide campaign will cen
ter about the reorganization of the
county programs of work. As a re
suit, the farm Bureau should develop
a state agricultural war program
the people as a
of Idaho should
what farm bureaus mean,
pected, furthermore, that the organ
ization throughout the state will be
strengthened by the addition of at
least five thousand more members.
The
t ole in the state
now more fully
It is ex
The British have established a
bridgehead south of the Lyss near
Wericosout. After fighting all night
and smashing forward for a gain of
7000 yards, one British corps con
tinued its advance until it reached
the banks of the Lyss south of Court
rai. Another corps established it
self between Heule and Courtrai.
The village of Hetjen was captured
after severe fighting ,in which the
Germans suffered 'tremendous losses.
American Troops Help in Repulsing
Bolshevik Forces
ARCHANGEL, Oct. 15—Allied
forces, including Americans, are en
gaged in repulsing heavy Bolskevik
attacks on both banks of the Devina,
150 miles north of Ketlass.
y
LIBERTY LOAN ANNOUNCEMENT
+
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Bingham county went over the tof in the fourth liberty loan
drive pn Wednesday the sixteenth. Chairman John G. Brown con
gratulates the people of this county on the way they met the demand.
He says that practically every school district in the county went
over the top. Almost every family went over the top. They bought
the amount they were assessed, and did it bravely. Families hav
ing debts to pay and crops they could not yet sell, worked out the
problem and bought their share of bonds and the initial payment
is in the bank. They did not hang back and "let George do it,"
they did it themselves and did it gladly.
Mr. Brown says that Bingham county is the best county in
America; there couldn't be any better There may be counties with
more money, but to him this county is 100 per cent American
and true blue. He loves it more for every sacrifice they make, and
understands tlTe people better as he work* with them longer in this
win-the-war game.
DUTCH WEST AND JESS
HEMBREE AGAIN IN COURT
"Dutch" Wst and Jess Hembree,
former Blackfoot
men, who were
generally in trouble or in jail dur
ing thetr residence in Bingham
county have just been arrested for
cattle stealing in Blain county, and
the officers claim to have plenty of
proof to send them back to the peni
tentiary, where they have been. It
was due to their jail break here
some years ago that F S. Fackrell
lost a leg by a rule shot.
PAUL ALLRED'S REJOINDER.
In our Monday's paper we pub-
lished a statement by Andrew Ander-
son indicating that Paul Allred had
given a check to a liberty bond sales-
man, that nobody would have any
trouble to stop payment on. This
was in answer to a statement by
Allred that he had gone back on the
Non-partisans and had stopped pay-
ment on his check made to the leSgue
for membership.
- Mr. Allred answers An4erson with,
rather wandering letter in which
he neither admits nor denies the' 1
charge about his check. He begins,
his letter by addressing the editor,
and then near the close he addresses;
his remarks to Anderson. We'are
always willing to give space to com
munications by others, but we like
to have them directed to some pur
pose. In other words, people who
write for publication are urged to
go straight to She point like a rat's
tail. Here is the Allred letter, mis
takes and all:
i
Thomas, Idaho,
io-ie-i8.
Editor Republican,
Blackfoot, Idaho.
Dear Sir: —
Replying to the libellous article
with which my neighbor, Andrew
Anderson, through the colums of
your paper, has chosen to kick back
when some , too apearent tender spot
was trodden on, will say first, that
have always acredited neighbor
Anderson with to much intelligence
openly lay himself amienable to
the laws of his country by the pub
lication Of a criminal libel. And
second that he trods on sacred
ground when he asiails the character
and patriotic standing of a neighbor,
too sacred in fact for the matter to
passed lightly, and third* that I
challenge Mr. Anderson for the pro
duction •of ally check made payable
a liberty bond salesman and which
could not be transferred by him for
reasons named by Anderson.
Mr. Parley Fackrell, the saleman,
uttrfed an indignant denial,
which you may verify by calling his
number, that he gave Anderson any
grounds whatever for the course
taken by him in venting the spleen
upon which the public may judge
itself as to his sympathy with
LaSeur, Horace Mann, and others
their kind. Mr. Anderson if you
cannot produce that check some re
tractions will be in order. It's your
next move.
Respectfully yours,
PAUL H. ALLRED.

E. C. Howard of Boise, was a busi
visitor in x^ackfoot Wednesday.
The Misses Ruth, and Anna Blom
quist and Francis Blomquist spent
week-end in Blackfoot.
at
RECEIVED WORD FROM
BEl.- ANDERSON
Mrs. Anderson by some means has
received the word that her son, Bert
Anderson, of this city, is well, and
that his name has never appeared
on the causulty list among the
wounded.
Several false reports . concerning
his condition have been received at
Blackfoot, but now Mrs. Anderson
rests assured that he is alright, altho
she has not heard directly from him.

BANKERS REALIZE DANGER.
Charles A. Henech, president of
the American Bankers' association,
in addressing the annual convention
at Chicago recently, pledged the for
tunes and lives of its 19,043 members
to continue the war until a victor
ious peace is assured. He declared
bankers will keep'-on fighting "not
to the last dollar, but to their last
unit of credit."
He said that "no peace that Ger
many will approve will satisfy Am
erica. We must not. conclude a
negotiated peace. Nothing should be
considered but an unconditional sur
render."
Mr. Hinsch declared the govern
ment, instead of restraining business,
is encouraging it, and he expressed
a h °P e for a continuation of this
policy after peace. "Out of the chaos
lnto ' w *tch the nation was plunged
coming the semblance of order,"
P 16 added.
He advocated universal military
training as essential to commercial
expansion and industrial growth.
The "so-called non-partisan league,"
^te said, "is the extreme manifesta
tion of unrest. The avowed purpose
of this organization, now strong in
16 states, is political control by a
class for a class and co-operative
selling and buying.
"They are too shrewd to launch
a new political party; their scheme
is to secure control of the dominant
political party ot the city, county
and state where they are operating.
They are now practically in control
of' North Dakota.
should be curbed before it assumes
the proportions of a prairie fire."
This movement

RESIGNED HER POSITION
Mrs. Grace Eckman has resigned
her position at the Seeger-Bundlie
company and has accepted a position
with the People's Store in Pocatello.
Mrs. Eckman has been with tlifr
Seeger-Bundlie confpany for several
months, and during that time has
made many friends in Blackfoot, not
only in the business world but so
cially as well.
FORMER RESIDENT
LEAVES FOR MOCOW
Fred Holbrook, son of Mr. and
Mrs. B. W. Holbrook of Rigby, a
former resident of this city, passed
thru Blackfoot Tuesday morning en
route to Moscow, where he will take
military training.

IMPROVING HIS CORN.
F. S. Robson w£s in from his farm
Presto recently and brought sam
ples of his early white dent corn.
He matured it in 100 days in 1917
and in 90 days in 1918.
The corn is sweet and rich, and
he has it ground into meal at the
Firth mill for family use. He says
difference between his fresh, sweet
meal and the stale meal one usually
gets at the stores is very marked.

ANOTHER FAMILY MOURNS.
Mrs. John Henry Larson of Wa
pello, received a telegram the first
the week announcing that her son
Private Harry Eugener Main, had
been killed in action on the 29th of
September.
He was the only son of Mrs. Lar
son and was a member of a Canadian
force.

ANOTHER OCTOBER DRAFT CALL
Idaho will during the five-day per
commencing October 21, fill
another draft call. It is for 271
men summoned to Camp Rosecrans,
California. The call has been ap
portioned to the various counts
draft boards over the state, and
Bingham county's quota is ten.

RESIGNED POSITION
Miss Mabel Molden, who for the
past nine years has been employed
the Brown-Hart company, re
signed her position and is taking a
much needed rest.
Miss Molden has not as yet de
cided what kind of work she will en
into in the future.
*
Miss Jessie Mulvey arrived in
Blackfoot Wednesday afternoon and
spend a few days visiting at the
home of her sister Mrs. Charles Kir
chner.
NOT SIGNATURE OF
FRANK R. GOODING
A representative of the Capital
News today asked Crawgord Moore,
president of the First National bank
of Boise, Idaho, if he was familiar
with the signature of Frank xx. Good
ing. This question was asked in
view of the controversy over the sig
nature to a letter purported to have
been signed by Mr. Gooding, but ad
mitted by former Chairman Taylpr
of the Republican state committee to
hav been signed by him.
Mr. Moore said he was familiar
with Mr. Gooding's signature. He
said he had taken occasion, after
the controversy started to compare
many of Mr. Gooding's signatiu'es,
which he knew to be genuine, with
the Gooding signature Taylor said
he had signed to the let$r in ques
tion.
"I made a careful comparison,"
said Mr. Moore, " and am prepared
to say that if the facsimile of the
Gooding signature that is said to
have been written by Mr. Taylor
(and the facsimile is all I have seen)
is a correct reproduction of such sig
nature. That it is not the signature
of Frank R. Gooding."—Capital
News.
STOP BURNING OF LEAVES
As soon as a strong autumn wind
sweeps down the valley Boise's
streets, sidewalks and yards will be
ankledeep with fallen leaves, and
then, if the plan of the past years is
followed, these leaves will be raked
into piles and burned. .The result
Will be that the city will be full of an
acrid smoke which will irritate the
membrane of the nose and throat,
aggravate all "colds" and create an
inflamaton that will make hundreds
of persons more susceptible to the
germs of Spanish Influenza.
In Salt Lake the health authorities
have forbidden the bunring of leaves
this year because the smoke will pro
bably aggriavate the influenza dan
ger. Boise physicians have long been
opposed to the burning practice and
this year, of all times, the local
authorities, here and elsewhere in
the state, should listen to and follow
the advise which physicians give.
Fallen leaves make nearly the best
mulch that is known. The cash value
of the leaves burned ip Boise every
autumn is probably sveral thousand
dollars, when their worth as mulch
and fertilizer is taken into account.
ThU year besides being watseful, the
burning of leaves will also prove an
unusual menance to the health of
the community. Other plans should
be made at once for their disposition
before the annual drop begins.
i

LETTERS BETTER THAN FOOD
Our head sergeant gets up on a
box with his arms loaded with letters
and calls out "mail!" It goes along
the line like wild fire. Where it
usually takes the men about five min
utes to assemble for drill call or
police duty, and about two or three
minutes for mess call, I'll bet that
within thirty seconds the whole com
pany is assembled when they hear
"The mail in." Then they all stand
as silently as if it were a funeral so
as not to miss a single name as the
sergeant calls them out. Some go
leaping and yelling with joy with two
or three letters, or perhaps with one.
The more unfortunate ones often
leave with tears in their eyes. * The
day the mall come is a bigger day
than pay day.
ANOTHER BIG RAISE
T
Butterfat Now 65c Per Pound
\
,We will receive your cream every Saturday at our
station in the rear of the Blackfoot Merc. Co. store.
We ALWAYS PAY THE HIGHEST
. mar
ket price and give you a square deal.
I
Mutual Creamery Co.
W! W. THATCHER* Agent
COTTAGE HOTEL
UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
Dining Room Opened
Tuesday Morning, Oct. 8
G, F. HUGHES, Owner
J. H, HUGHES, Manager
■as
PEACE RUMORS
PROVE UNTRUE
Wlison's Reply is Highly
Commended by British
arid French Editors.
AMSTERDAM, Oct. 16. — The
Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant has
withdrawn its statement reporting
the capitulation of Germany and the
abdicatin of Emperor William.
This step was taken the newspaper
says, because it was unable to obtain
any confirmation of the report.
LONDON. Oct. 16.—The official
press bureau is officially informed
that the reports publishel this after
noon to the effect that Germany has
capitulated have no foundation in
fact
Standing Before Cessation of War,
Says Baron Buiian
BASIL, Switzerland, Oct. 16.—
Confidence that Turkey would remain
faithful to the Teutonic alliance was
epressed by JBaron Burian, the Aus
tro-Hungarian foreign minister, in
the course of a statement to the
foreign affairs committee of the Hun
garian delegation, according to
Vienna adives. The foreign minister
also reasserted Austria-Hungary's
fidelity to Germany.
"We shall enter upon any negotia
tions," he said, "closely united with
our faithful Germany ally and with
Turkey, which continues to keep her
engagement toward the alliance, not
withstanding the difficult situation
in which she is placed by the disap
pearance of Bulgaria."
Baron Burian added that the assent'
of 'Austria and Germany to evacua
tion had been established and that
he was certainly not too optimistic
in supposing, n view of the situation,
"we are standing immediately be
fore a cessation of hostilities and
shall shortly enter into negotiations
with the entente."
Paris Newspapers Wax Enthusiastic
Over Wilson Reply
PARIS, Oct. 1.—Enthusiastc ap
proval s given President Wilson's re
ply to Germany by the morning news
papers today. The Figaro says Pre
sident Wilson's depth of thought and
staunch loyalty no longer permit the
Germans to compromise with defeat.
It adds that it puts the question of
German morality with singular force
and that is the question which
divides the world.
The president, the Petit Jarlsien
says, seeks to prepare the separaton
of the German nation from its pre- *
sent rulers and, if he succeeds, Prus
sian militarism will be dead.
Your Eyes
May see perfectly, yet have a
muscle defect that causes
headaches, dizziness and nerve
derangements. Save eyes and
health by having them properly
attended by a specialist. See
Dr. H. H. Scarborough at the
Eccles Hotel
Wednesday, Oct. 23

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