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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, October 25, 1918, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1918-10-25/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE IDAHO REPUBLICAN
B EM I-WEEKLY
Published every Tuesday and Friday
BYRD TREGO,Editor and Proprietor
Entered at the postoffice at Black
toot, Idaho, as second-class matter.
Subscription price • 13.00 per Year
a
STATE AND COUNTY TICKET
A vote for these men assures the
defeat of un-American, Social
. istic administration in Idaho.
Republican Ticket
UNITED STATES SENATOR
Borah, William E.
Gooding, Frank R.
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
Smith, Addison T.
GOVERNOR
Davis, D. W.
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
Moore, C. C."
SECRETARY OF STATE
Jones, R. O.
STATE AUDITOR
Gallett, Edward G.
STATE TREASURER
Eagleson, John W.
ATTORNEY GENERAL
Black, Roy L. ,
INSPECTOR OF MINES .
Bell, Robert N.
SUPT. OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Redfleld, Ethel E.
STATE SENATOR,
Lee, William A.
STATE REPRESENTATIVES
Yorgesen, Soren
Robbins, Lewis
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
First District
Christensen, James
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
.Second District
Bills, R. Gordon
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
Third District
Fugate, M. A.
CLERK DISTRICT COURT
Fisher, F. M.
SHERIFF
Simmons, A. II.
PROBATE JUDGE .
Good, James E.
COUNTY SUPT. OF SCHOOLS
Faulconer, Grace
ASSESSOR
Malcom, E. T.
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
Adair, Ralph W.
CORONER
Peck, E. T.
The form of ballot has been
amended. Take this list to the polls.
--•
DECLARATION OF PURPOSE
On behalf of the candidates of the
Republican party in this county. I
desire to announce that it will be our
purpose to have the county accounts
audited every two years hereafter for
the triple purpose of discovering er
rors in bookkeeping, improving and
modernizing methods of accounting
and to prevent fraud and remove the
temptation to defraud.
J. H. ANDERSEN,
Chairman.
REPUBLICAN CENTRAL COMMIT
TEE.
MISREPRESENTING THE NON
PARTISAN LEAGUE
People are misrepresenting the
Non-partisan league both ways. A
great deal has been published that
was unfavorable to the league, and
without telling just where the infor
mation came from. We have been
told by a number of league members
in whom we had confidence, that the
things that were being published
against the league were simply made
up, and that nobody signs their
names to them or stands back of
them.
Thinking that might be true, we
have been looking up literature about
the league, and find that it is not a
all true. There are many responsible
people in North Dakota, who have
been writing and publishing things
MADAM,
Have You Bought
Your Gray Boots?
If not, better lose no time—and
you'd better "stock up" with several
pairs.
We have the largest stock of them in
town today.
But we cannot get another pair until the
kaiser is licked.
The government will not allow any more
gray boots to be made.
No advance in price—$8.00 to $12,00.
9
BEACHY SHOE CO.
against the league for periods rang
ing from a few months to a couple of
years, and not only signing them and
giving their address and residence,
but having writings copyrighted and
challenging the league to sue them
for libel. '
One such work is a book by J. W.
Brinton, and seven farmers of Beach,
N. D., the title of the book being
"Townley ft Co. and the Non-partisan
League."
Another is "The Farmer and
Townleylsm," a warning to the
farmer against Townleylsm as ex
ploited in North Dakota, published
by J. D. Bacon of Grand Forks, N.
D.
Another is "The Non-partisan
League From the Inside,'' by Rev.
S. R. Maxwell, copyrighted by the
Dispatch Printing company, sold by
the St. Marie News company of 86
East Fifth street, St. Paul, Minn.,
price 50 cents. These books sell at
from 50 cents down, and show that
tlie league work was slarted by
farmers and afterwards taken up by
Townley and other Socialists, and
that a machine was'built exactly on
the plan of the kaiser's machine by
which he rules Germany and sets one
man against another to do his will.
The original work of the league was
good, but Townley and the others
have used it for their own selfish
purposes and to make money, dis
regarding the interests of those they
pretend to serve. The men at the
top furnish the plans, dictate the
policies .take the money, pay the bills
engineer the conventions, nomina
tions and legislatures and that the
real work of the league is Socialistic
on the German plan, not American
and not Democratic.
We find that a good many people
in this country have copies of these
and other books on the subject, and
a numbeff of them have written to
find out whether these various farm
ers and other references given in the
literature are real or fictitious, and
they receive prompt replies that are
very convincing and all containing
the appeal to come and see if they
don't believe, and to defeat Townley
ism at all hazard or be crushed by it.
Among the persons who have such
books and fetters are S. Beebe and
J. **. Anderson rff Blackfoot, and we
believe they have several copies
apiece of some of those named.

LEAGUE KEEPING ITS MEMBERS
IN THE DARK
We have been hearing reports that
the Non-partisan league was asking
its members in Bannock county not
to attend meetings held by its oppon
ents, and not tp talk with other peo
ple about political matters, but we
had doubts about it being true. t We
thought it was too crude' a thing for
anybody in free America to do, but in
a recent issue of the Twin Falls
Times, which is the league paper for
that county, is a report of a league
rally addressed by their Candidate
for governor, H. F. Samuels, and it
gives a glowing account of the meet
ing, and among other things warns
the people not to read any papers or
literature but theirs.
If their own papers and speakers
are to be believed, they are afraid to
have their people investigate dr do
any thinking. We have read that
they tried to change the constitution
of North Dakota to take out the
educational clause for qualifications
for citizenship, and we doubted it
for a while, but there is ample proof
that it was undertaken, and only pre
vented by a bitter fight, from hold
over senators whom the Non-partis
ans said were representing "the in
terests.'' The Non-partisans in this
state are making a desperate attempt
to get control of the university, and
put it under Socialistic teachers, so
it is plain that each county should
be taking steps to elect standpat
legislators, w(ho will also represent
"the interests" of the .rising genera
tion.
The only conclusions that can be
dawn from the efforts of the Non
partisans in preventing their mem
bers from reading or talking or in
any way getting the ideas of others
than their members is, that there is
something rotten they do not want
people to learn about, or that the
leaders do not think the members
know enough to hear both sides and
then judge for themselves. They say
in their own letters that they are de
pending on the blind, ignorant vote
for fifteen *or twenty thousand votes
at the polls, and they expect to get
them by stealth.

FAILURES OF SCHOOL BOARD
INVITE EMBEZZLEMENT
It is easy to criticise when things
havfe gone wrong. It is not easy to
analyze the intricate problems and
make it clear just how things go
wrong and escape observation. This
is a proper time to study some of
these troublesome things and to com
prehend matters that have escaped
attention and baffled our understand
ing.
The Blackfoot school board has
neglected a number of things, and
we believe some of these things have
been neglected because the members
of th board did not comprehend the
necessity for them. We believe the
average citizen knew and under
stood less about it than the trustee?.
Just at this time it is easy to see why
slight neglect on the part of the.
board opened up the way for em
bezzling large sums of money with
out the board or the bank having
any knowledge of the crime at the
time. If the embezzler won in his
speculation he put it back, but if he
lost, the people had to bear the loss.
One thing the trustees neglected
to do was to nee that the bank in
which the funds were kept, paid in
terest on the daily balances lying in
the bank. The lafwi makes it their
duty to keep the money where they
can secure the highest rate of inter
est on daily balances, and the law
makes it the duty of the treasurer
to make a warrant-call as often as
he accumulates 81000. (It used to be
8300.)
By neglecting to give any atten
tion to these matters it left the treas
urer free to mis-inform the board as
to how much there was on hand or
not to inform them at all. In either
case the board for the past many
months did not know the facts at all,
and there was nothing to bring it to
the attention of the bank that any
certain portion of the money on hand
belonged to the school and that it
was costing them any certain amount
for the use of it. Evidently the bank
did not pay enough attention to it
to discover that there was 820,000'
or 826,000 or any other sum in that
fund by rights, but that in fact it was
out on speculation or in private loans
being engineered by the cashier of
the bank who was also the treasurer
for the school.
The public had no chance to know
these things, because no publication
was ever made to show the public the
detailed list of receipts and disburse
ments for the year. If this had been
I done, some citizens would have dis
covered that more than 81000 was,
or should have been on hand at cer
tain times and that no warrant call
was made or no warrants redeemed
iwdth it and no interest stopped on
the warrants. Some citizens would
have scanned the list of receipts and
observed that ho interest was being
collected from daily balances. The
key to the whole loss may be said
to be the lack of publication of de
tailed financial statements and lack
of interest on the part of the public
who had no means, of getting infor
mation except by asking to see the
books, and few people have the time*
or the ability to figure out very
much if they had the books. Up to a
few weeks ago the treasurer seems
to have been under no bond to secure
the school funds, altho he had pos
session of as much as 826,211 at a
time, and unknown to the board and
the publie, was speculating with or
loaning it. And^hat is not all, he
had a reputation for making loans
to men whose rating was so weak
that they could not borrow of the
banks at all.
The law requires the treasurer to
deposit the school money in a special
deposit, not on his private account.
He cannot carry the funds around
in his pockets nor put them in a
safety deposit vault nor deposit
them in a bank in his own namS.
Up to last February he had never
complied with the law in this respect
but spilled the money around in pri
vate loans and private investments
and had as high as 826,000 of school
warrants drawing interest when they
should have been paid off with the
money he had received.
The particular acts shown by the
auditors' report to have been crimes
under our law, and commited within
the last .three years and consequently
not outlawed, are as follows:
Failure to deposit money in
special deposit.
Knowingly keeping false accounts.
Fraudulently falsifying accounts.
Wilfully refusing to pay money
that was in his hands and for which
warrants were presented. ,
Failure to make warrant-calls or
disburse money according to law.
Using money in ways not provided
by the law..
City Connells are Making Similar
Mistakes
What has been said regarding the
failure to publish detailed financial
statements by the school board, ap
plies also to every city council we
have had for a decade. The law re
quires them to publish a full finan
cial statement every three months,
and when complaints have been made
about it, there has followed publica
tion of a meager, condensed state
ment like the school board has made,
that had little or no value when pub
lished.
ft:
A MORAL AWAKENING
NEEDED HERE
It is unfortunate that in the midst
of a great war, when men are bleed
ing, dying for our liberties and our
Integrity as a nation, when millions
across the sea are slowly starving,
when we are concentrating our en
ergies on the task of saving the
world from ruin in a mighty hollo
cust, when every train sees enlisted
men leaving for* the front to stand
between us and destruction, that we
should be drawn aside in a counter
movement at home to prevent our
home state government from falling
into the hands of forces upholding
the ideas that have wrecked so much
of Europe, and in litigation to get
back the money once raised and de
Charming Dresses
at Special Prices
FOR THE NEXT FEW DAYS WE WILL
SELL ALL OF OUR STOCK OF LADIES' •
SILK AND SERGE DRESSES AT SPECIAL
PRICES.
/
AS 4,
These dresses are all good fabrics in brown,
navy, burgundy, black and green, made up in
beautiful styles and are remarkable values at
the prices.
Lot A silks values up to $ 18.50 priced at $13.75
Lot B silks values up to $25.00 priced at $17.75
ill
|
Lot C wool serge values up to $23.50 priced
$14.75
at.
h
Lot D wool serge values up to $35.00 priced
I
$19.75
at
Kinney
Mercantile Company
Blackfoot
We Appreciate Your Business
(l
Phone 37
livered for operating our home in
stitutions, and in other litigation to
determine the right of^trusted men
to longer exercise their liberties and
rights of citizenship among us.
When men have trusted implicitly
and staked fortunes on a man's
honor, when youth have looked with
admiration on a character and idol
ized it, when confidence is shaken
and idols shattered, when there is a
tacit, and almost public admission of
guilt and oft-repeated looting of the
public treasury, that men should
hesitate about upholding the majesty
of the law is a sign of a well ad
vanced process of the decay of moral
fiber, that needs awakening ( as men's
patriotism has been awakened by the
ordeals and the crises of war.
WE ANSWER IT
*\,R THEM
-ft
Nonpartisan speakers, and men
who have been listening to them, are
presistently asking this question, and
acting as if there was no answer to
it. "What,has the government or
either or both of the old political
parties or the people of the towns
done to help the farmer?"
The federal government at Wash
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ington has done what it has not done
for any other industry. It has es
tablished a department of agriculture
ar.d employed experts by the hun
dreds, and workers by the thousands
to go all over the' earth to hunt up
and assemble the best fruits and
plants adapted to use in our coun
try.
Experts are employed to specialize
in every branch of agricultural and
stockraising pursuits to improve prrf?
duction and prevent and stamp out
diseases. A great printing house is
operated in Washington to furnish
free literature specializing on all
lines of agricultural problems under
the sun, and agricultural colleges
and university extension department
afford free education for anyone de
siring to study in these lines. Speak
ers and teachers go out among the
farmers with institutes and demon
strations! clubs ard organized, where
k*ys and girls are given expert train
ing in raising many of the standard
products and in canning and preserv
ing farm products. Experimental
stations are maintained to make ex
periments and to teach all who will
go or write to them for instruction.
Farm bureaus and county agricul
tural agents serve the interests of the
farmer and stockman without charge *
and the cost of such service is taxed
alike to all the Industries and all
property.' Labor agents with office
and equipment are maintained - in
many counties and towns at public
expense, and last winter some four
or five men, directors of the Civic
league of this county, pledged their
own resources to the amount of
82400 to hire office help and get a
labor agent to work without waiting
for official action by couiity officials.
'In this state there is a farm markets
bureau, operated at great expense
for the benefit of the farmers, and
the expense it taxed to all alike.
Thru it the assessors and county
clerks are required to make out re
ports to forward to the farm markets
bureau to help in stabllzing the
prices of farm products by prevent
ing unequal distribution or getting
them congested in some places and
allowing a shortage in others,'and
the worst handicap yet found in op
erating that department has been
.that they could not get the farmer
himself to co-operate hy giving in
formation to the public officials when
asked to do so.
Continue on page eight

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