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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, November 15, 1918, Image 2

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m HE II
t
BORAH, SMITH AND FRENCH WILL
GO BACK TO WASHINGTON
FOR ANOTHER TERM.
Davis Chosen as Governor and Entire
State Ticket Elected, With
Exception of Gooding, Who
Lost to Nugent
Boise, Idaho.-—The Republicans
were successful in the election of No-'
vember 5, the state ticket being elect
ed, although Frank R. Gooding has
been defeated for the short term to
the senate by John F. Nugent
Senator William E. Borah has been
returned to the senate, being elected
to represent Idaho until March 4,
1925.
Congressmen Smith and French
have been indorsed by the voters of
Idaho and will retain their seats in
the house of representatives.
D. W. Davis will be the next gov
ernor of Idaho; C. C. Moore, lieutenant
governor; Robert O. Jones, secretary
of state; Edward G. Gallett, auditor;
John W. Eagleson, treasurer; Roy L.
Black, attorney general; Ethel E. Red
field, superintendent of public instruc
tion ; Robert N. Bell, inspector of
mines. Alfred Budge was elected as
a justice of the supreme court.
The race between Senator Nugent
and farmer Governor Gooding was a
dose one,; so close indeed that it is
announced Governor Gooding will de
mand an official count
With the exception of Senator
Borah, John W. Eagleson, the Repub
lean state treasurer, and Senator John
F. Nugent, none of the candidates in
dorsed by the Non-partisan league in
Idaho was elected.
The league was also unsuccessful in
the counties and elected only about
twenty members of the legislature.
The legislature will be' safely Re
publican in both houses.
Every Republican on the Bingham
county ticket was successful In Tues
day's election. The county also was
Republican in its vote ° n state offi
cers.
1
One of the features of the campaign
Just ended wa9 the absence from the
town halls of the state of the cam
paign speaker—the candidate who in
the past has been supposed to visit
every section of the state and tell the
voters what an ideal man he is for the
place he seeks, and why they should
vote against his opponent for political
honors.
The influenza epidemic caused a ban
to be put upon public gatherings of all
kinds, hence the oratory of the differ
ent candidates was lost to the Idaho
citizenry. But there was no lack of
interest in the campaign. Being de
nied the privilege of addressing the
voters of the state in person, many
of the candidates resorted to news
paper publicity, and many columns of
campaign arguments were published in
the press of the state, to the gratifica
tion at least of the publisher. How
the public appreciated the innovation
is a question open to debate.
The prevalence of influenza was re
sponsible for a much lighter vote than
would have been cast had health con
ditions throughout the state been
normal.
cause they were confined to their
homes with the disease, while
others doubtless did not go to the
polls because they desired to avoid
coming in contact with some who were
probably afflicted with the disease.
|
a
to
and
ing
the
and
to
on
Many did not vote be
SENATOR W. E. BORAH
i
1
i
Senator Borah has been again se
lected by the voters of Idaho to rep
resent the Gem state in the senate.
Slow Count In Montana.
|H|||||lWl States
Walsh was leading in the contest for
the United States senatorship in Mon
tana v when the votes of 422 precincts
out of 1400 in the state had been
counted Tuesday night.
Glemenceau Given Ovation.
Paris.—M. Clemenceau, the premier,
was accorded a wonderful ovation in
the chamber of deputies as he read to
the deputies the terms of the armistice
with Austria-Hungary. He said terms
bad been submitted to Germany.
■ ■ i
Senator j,
Helena.—United
to
a
with
ing
♦H H » l>l 1 1 4-K
MORELAND
' •
+♦+♦+
4- i -F4- i -+- i -» I » i + 1
A new baby boy arrived at the
home of Mrs. Ida Benson last week.
Miss Revella Wray, the clerk at
the Lindsay store, is staying at the
home of Mrs. Blanche Wray, be
cause her folks have the influenza.
Mi88 Blanche and*Locloe Robbins
have been ill for a few days, it is re
ported that they have the flu.
Jack Grieve, .who has been from
his home for the past few months,
returned and spent a few days with
his home folks.
Archie Grimmet, who has been in
a training school in Logan, Utah, re
turned to his home Wednesday even
ing. He expects to leave for the
camp again in a few days.
Mr. and *-rs. John Wheeler and
family of Rigby, Idaho are visiting
with Mr. Wheeler's parents here.
Mrs. W. W. Young, who has been
living in Blackfoot, is now at the J.
F. Grimmett home. Mrs. Young ex
pects to make her home in this town.
Miss Jannett McKnight was hurt
in a buggy accident, but is now bet
ter. She was thrown from the buggy
and one of the wheels ran over her
arm and left it quite sore for some
time.
No-'
has
to
been
4,
of
in
gov
L.
Red
of
as
a
is
de
in
in
in
Re
was
offi
Joice Hudson, the eight year old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hudson,
died Saturday night. The little girl
had the Spanish influenza.
All of the members of the John
hall family are 111 with the influenza
except one small boy.
* Ralph Robbins, George Furnls,
Will Christensen and William Mc
Knight have been riding around the
streets in a Ford oar and shooting
guns all morning, sice word was re
ceived that Germany had surrend
ered.

♦ I ♦ i ♦ I ♦ I » I
STERLING
t
Ben Atkins, the barber, is spend
ing a vacation on his ranch near
Pingree.
The Holmquist family are down
with the influenza.
Dave Quigley of Pocatello came
over to attend the funeral of his
nephew. The funeral was held at
the Springfield cemetery.
The Larkin club met with Mrs.
M. A. Driscoll Saturday afternoon.
Claude Parsons is confined to his
bed with the influenza.
L. Mont Rich and Vince Marriott
made a business trip to Blackfoot
Tuesday.
The funeral services for Mrs.
Veda Watts, who died Tuesday morn
ing at Pocatello, were held at Poca
tello Thursday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. W. AAParsons expect
to move • to Blackfoot soon, where
they will make their future home.
The Tanner family, who are ill
with the flu, are improving.
Mr. Walker, who was druggest
here, resigned his position and re
turned to Blackfoot.
Miss Adeline Nelson came home
Saturday from Provo to stay until
school reopens. She has been ill
.with influenza.
Ralph Parsons came home Satur
day from St. Anthony, where he has
been for some time.
the
in
the
the
ban
all
of
de
the
of
in
re
| GRANDVIEW *
*
Luther Satterfield is the latest vic
tim of iae flu. .
The Quigley family are reported
a great deal better this week.
Joe Cosgrove returned from the
hospital a Pocatello Saturday.
D. Wiltamuth and family drove
over to Joe Maxwell's Sunday.
H. K. Wiley and family were the
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. R.
Davis.
Some of the Mexicans, who are
employed by he sugar company, have
moved into the house recently va
cated by H. A. Massie.
There seems to be a good many
beets yet to be harvested in this
neighborhood.
Fred Wahler's thresher is dawn in
the Sterling country at present. He
purchased a new outfit this fall and
has had a good run which will last
for some time longer.
Thomas Prudhomme butchered
twenty-five. hogs and delivered them
to the market at Pocatello Monday.
Quite a load of pork.
We understand that Ancil Rupe
thinks of moving to Oklahoma in the
spring.
A. D. Henderson has commenced
fall plowing. »
I. N .Noyer, D. Wiiltamuth and Joe
Maxwell loaded a car of pure
Grimm's alfalfa seed he first of the
week for A. B. Lyman of ExcelBior,
Minn. Another car of seed is to be
shipped a little later.
H. L. Lorve was out from Aber
deen Saturday. He is anxious to do
quite a lot of repair work on the
canal before it freezes up, if men
and teams can be secured. Both are
somewhat scarce, owing to the fall
piewing, beet harvesting and thresh
ing yet to be done.
G. E. Young returned the first of
the week from a trip to Salt Lake
and Portland, having been away
about four weekB.
Mark Driscoll and family were
callers in Grandview Sunday.
F. N. Stroschein and family drove
to Aberdeen Sunday afternoon.
Everett Claunch drove out to his
homestead Tuesday, enroute to Arco*
where he goes to make final proof
on his land.
be
of
-*■
i ♦♦ i
■ ■ i
j,
ROSE
Leo Gushwa is plowing with the
tractor for Mr. Starkweather.
T. A. Kurse is thinking of moving
to Thomas.
Delbert Taylor has recovered from
a slight illness.
Mrs. L. W .Gushwa spent Thursday
with Mr .and Mrs. Jacob Gushwa of
Blackfoot.
Alma Jackman and family are go
ing to move to their new home in
Aberdeen as soon as they recover
on
Mr.
on
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Poster Used by Department of Agriculture in National Campaign for More
Food Production.
Food Production.
FARMER IS MAN
BEHIND SOLDIER
The man behind the plow, Depart
ment of Agriculture officials believe,
is the man behind the man behind
the gun, an dthe idea has been em
bodied in a striking poster that is
soon to be used throughout the
country in hammering home the im
portance of the American farmer's
big war Job.
Edward Penfield, poster artist of
New York, painted the picture, which
rows to produce food for the men in
shows a plowman working in the fur
the trenches. Against a sunlit back
ground are seen the silhouetted fig
ures of soldiers in battle.
Fanners Not To FaiL
Food production problems are de
scribed ps growing more acute with
the progress of the war, the increas
ing demands fer food, the calling of.
more men to the argty, and other'
results of America straining every
nerve toward one objective. But De
partment of Agriculture officials are
assured in every mail and from every
section of the country that the farm
ers are not going to fail in their war
task. Farmers have gone over the
top for the period of the war. The
new poster is intended to impress up
on people of cities and towns the
great importance of accommodating
agriculture . in its requirements of
labor, finance and marketing.
Fanner's Place Recognized.
I
t
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SI
Ld
EPS
Cull all but the Wage-Earning Cow s from the Herd.
KEEP NONE BUT
PROFITABLE COWS
A fire will not burn without fuel,
an engine refuses to run without oil,
and a dynamo balks sans power.
The farmer who tried to winter his
horse without fee devidently is not
conversant with these facts. Hence
the horse died. Similarly the dairy
man who tries to produce a regular
and generous flow of milk from a
herd that is fed on a hit-or-mis,
hand-to-mouth style of ration,
lives to learn,
many unprofitable
in the
farmers are wasting labor and feed
In attempting to transform low-pro
ducing cow into wage-earners or be
cause dairymen are underfeeding
the production and overfeeding the
shirker animals In their herds.
There are
dariy cows
country today because
§1
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EIGHT ESSENTIALS
FOR WINTER EGGS
Some poultry keepers, seemingly
without much particular effort, get
winter eggs while others work hard
but more or less in vain. The former
knowingly or unknowingly provides
essentials necessary for winter egg
production while in the case of the
latter some important factor 1 b ne
lgected. Eight essentials are neces
sary, according to poultry specialists
of the United States department of
from the inuuenza.
George Mason and M. Watson of
Blackfoot have gone to Swan valley
on a huntng trip.
Mrs. George Mason visited with
Mr. and Mrs. Joy Langle of IBackfoot
over Sunday.
The united war campaign is now
on in this district. The allotment
The Importance of the farmer in
the organization of American re
sources to win the war was expres
sed by the Secretary of Agriculture
in his recent appeal "to the patriots
on the farms'' to go "over the top''
this fall for a great harvest of wheat
in 1919. In this appeal the Secre
tary said:
"You have occupied and do occupy
the first line trenches of the food
army. You have to light the diffi
culties too. I am not numlndful of
these. In the Department of Agri
culture we consider them daily, and
daily we give our best efforts to
help you meet them. You know of
the difficulties In your community,
but I know of them in many com
munities of many States, and so ser
iously do they impress me that I
might almost consider them insur
mountable had not American farmers
last year, and again this year, re
vealed the true American fighting
spirit and ability to meet serious sit
uations. They will not' let the war
fail because of deficient food produc
tion.
"Let us sow liberally for a big har
vest in 1919. It has been called the
Liberty Wheat Harvest. We all hope
It will be. But let us undertake the
task with the determination that we
will sweat our blood for many more
if need be before we yield one meas
ure of our freedom to a Prussian
domination. Let us fight in the fur
rows."
6,
s from the Herd.
During the period of the war with
grains in limited supply and high
priced, the maximum of care should
be exercised to prevent the waste of
any of these valuable materials.
Under existent conditions all farm
roughages should be utilized to the
fullest extent consistent with econ
omic production. However, it is tjie
height of folly to starve the deserv
ing dairy cows in order to save
grain. Good cows must be fed and
fed well. Every effort should be
exerted to produce as much milk as
possible and still to maintain the
cows in the pink of productive con
dition. Feed the profitable cows to
capacity according to their produc
tion. Cull the unprofitable cows
from the herd immediately. The
manufacture of beef in the dairy
barn does not pay even in view of
the high prices which fat cows now
bring for butcher disposition'.
a
a
agriculture In securing winter eggs.
They are (1) suitable stock; (2)
comfortable quarters; (3) kind
treatment; (4) regular attention;
(5) abundant water; (6) whole
some food; (7) liberal rations; (8)
congenial exercise. Due considera
tions to each of these essentials will
bring success, but if the result in
eggs are poor—far below the moder
ate standard of five dozen eggs per
hen in the first six months of laying
—that fact is proof that the require
ments have not all been fully met.
is $400.
Lorenzo Hansen is here a few days
from Fort Hall.
The war campaign committee met
at the home of Albert Gardner Mon
day evening.
Mrs. J. G .Waring had word that
Willie Johnson has been quarantined
on board a ship for five weeks, but
PUBLIC SALE
Having sold my ranch, I will sell all my livestock, furniture
and implements at public auction at m^ranch in Riverside
on
Tuesday, November 19
BEGINNING AT 1.30 P. M. SHARP
LIVESTOCK
Span horses, yearling steer, 4 pigs and a lot of chickens.
FARMING IMPLEMENTS
Two wagons, 2 mowers, hay rake, hay rack, tongue scraper,
spring-tooth harrow, beet and potato cultivator, walking plow
FURNITURE
New Copper* Clad range, Storey and Clark organ, beds,
springs, mattresses, chiffonier, dresser, rugs, linoleum-, table
and chairs, washing machine, and many other tools and
household goods.
TERMS„OF SALE: All sums of $10 and under, cash;
over that amount a credit of six months will be given on ap
proved notes bearing 10 per cent interest; 5 per cent off for
cash.
I. B. CHAPMAN, Owner
N. E. MONTGOMERY, Auctioneer
I
thought the company would be able
to sail soon.
John Norman is slowly improving,
after his second attack o fthe influ
enza.
10
WILL PAY SOONER
The date of maturity of United
States treasury certificates of indebt
edness of series 4 D .dated August
6, 1918, has been advanced from De
cember 5, 1918 to November 21,
1918, according to telegram received
by Governor James K. Lynch of the
Twelfth federal reserve district from
secretary of the treasury William G.
McAdoo.
The folliwing notice has been
given to holders of these United
States treasury certificates of in
debtedness:
"All United States treasury cer
tificates of indebtedness of series 4
D, dated August 6, 1918, and matur
ing December 5, 1918, are hereby
called for redemption on November
21, 1918, at par and accrued interest
pursuant to the provision for such
redemption contained in the certi
ficates. On November 21, 1918 In
terest on all certificates of said series
will cease to accrue."
11
and
RANG HIS ARM OFF
The sugar factory office was not
open when the celebrating started
Monday morning and somebody took i
a run to the factory to ask the en-!
gineers to blow the whistles. i 20
One of t he boys was assigned to j
the task and he said he pulled the 1
cord till he rang his arm off and had
to wait for it to grow out again.
KNITTING INSTRUCTIONS
Sweaters, Important Suggestions
Casting on and binding off must be
loose.
When knitting with two needles,
always slip first stitch.
To measure a garment, lay it on
a level surface and measure with a
dependable measure (wood, metal,
or celluloid, not a tape line.)
Terms used, (applying to plain
knitting with two needles): a "row"
once across; a "ridge" or "rib"—
once across and back.
Sweater of Heavy-Weight Wool '
Quantity of wool required:—about
one pound or four hanks of 4-5 yarn.
One pair Red Cross needles No. 3.
Cast on 7 2 stitches.
Knit 2, purl 2, for 3 inches.
Knit across and purl back for 10
Inches.
Knit 1 row.
ia) Knit 6, purl across; and knit
last 6 stitches.
(B) Knit all the way across. '
Repeat (A) and (B) for 8 inches.
Knit across and back 8 times;
(making 4 ridges.)
PUBLIC SALE
We the undersigned will sell at public sale Jointly, on
NOVEMBER 18,1918
At the E. M. Snider ranch one-fourth mile north of the Osborn store, the)
following described property... Sale to begin at 11.00 o'clock sharp. '
HORSES
Gray mare 5 years old, weight 1600 (full blood percheronjj gray
mare 12 years old; gray mare 6 years old; brown gelding 6 years old;
black gelding, 10 years old; sorrel gelding, 10 years old; brown gelding,
10 year old; bay Alley coming 2 years old; filly 2 years old; yearling colt;
2 spring mare colts.
. i
CATTLE
Two milk cows; 1 two year Old heifer; 2 yearling heifers- 1 vearlino'
steer; 1 steer calf. ' 1 K
HOGS
pounds™ br00< * S0WB wlth p,gs bjr 8 S°°d shoats, weight about eighty
w „ Farming Implements
wagon good as new, 2 old wagons, 2 sulky plows- u
walking plow; good three-horse fresno; 2 sets" STork**LSSj"23
be given. A 'good^klble^ote^iUbrrequtied. * 1 °' 8l * months tlme will
FREE LUNCH AT NOON
(Bring your sugar)
E. M. SNIDER and BAXTER BROTHERS
* "• KENNEDY ' A »^oneer. -L. o. COLLINS, Clerk.
Kn
it 6; then purl 1, knit 1 for 11
stitches; knit 6.
Bind off 26 stitches for neck.
First Shoulder
Knit 6; then purl 1, knit 1 for 11
stitches; knit 6.
Knit 7; then purl 1, knit 1 for
10 stitches; knit 6.
Continue to knit ■ and purl back
and forth In this way 14 times,
which leaves the wool at inner edge.
Break off wool and tie it on at
neck-opening for
Second Shoulder
Knit 7; then purl 1, knit 1 for 10
stitches; knit 6.
Knit 6; then purl 1, knit 1, for
11 stitches; knit 6.
Continue to knit and purl back
and forth in this way 14 times, which
leaves the wool at Inner edge.
Cast on 26 stitches; knit6; then
purl 1, knit 1, for 11 stitches; knit 6.
Knit across and back 8 times
(making 4 ridges.)
(C) Knit all the way across.
ijj) Knit 6; purl across, and knit
last 6 stitches.
Repeat (C) and (D) for 8 inches.
Knit across and purl bacl^ for 10
inches.
Purl 2, knit 2, for 3 inches.
Bind off losely. Sew* up sides,
leaving 9 Inches for armholes.
Single-crochet 1 row around neck
and armholes.
Measurements:
i stretched,)
Across chest (not stretched,) 17—
i 20 Inches.
j
1
Neck
—12*
(when
inches.
Look
For the Crescent
On the Can

The trade mark that guaran
tees the purity of the product.
Crescent
i»]
1*7*1
EH
Powder
has proven that it will raise the
dough—that it's economical
because of the greater energy,
and that its high standard of
quality is always maintained.
Grocers sell Crescent—.25s lb.
(B- 342 )

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