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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, November 26, 1918, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1918-11-26/ed-1/seq-5/

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CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Advertisements under
this h>ad will be charged for at the
rate of 10 cents per line each issue.
The Republican will not be re
sponsible for more than one Inser
tion for errors In classified • adver
tisements.
RATES:
FOR SALK—Miscellaneous
BEANS 72 W CENTS PER POUND
delivered in Blackfoot.
282R1, Ralph Johnson, R. 2. 19a-tf
Phone
HAVE 350 SHEEP TO SELL IN
lots to suit buyer, bred to lamb
in March. Blackfoot Realty com
pany. See N. J. ThorBtenberg. .
adv 19 tf.
FOR SALE—50 old ewes, prices rea
sonable. T. P. Fackrell, 2 miles
south of Pingree.
adv. 18a-2m
HEATING STOVES, ONE LARGE,
one medium sized heater for sale
at the Republican office.
tf.
WANTED
I WANT TO RENT FROM 40 TO 80
acres of good irrigated land with
improvements, cash or crop rent.
Phil Longhurst, Shelley, R. 1,
phone 74J3.
adv 19-2
WANTED—Salesmen for Art and
Business Calendars, Leather Goods
Advertising specialties. All bus
iness will "hum"—Liberal com
*' mission; exclusive territory. Per
il manent position.—Economy Ad
vertising Co., Iowa City, la.
BETWEEN BLACKFOOT AND
Fort Hall Indian school, two auto
tires with license attached; In
holder and locked. Reward will
be paid for tkelr return. Notify
A. C. Pearson at sheriff's office at
Idaho Falls.
adv. 16a tf
TO LOAN
ON SMALL FARMS AND IM
proved city property $300, $500
and $1000. George M. Watson,
Qak street. Blackfoot. adv 19-2p
LOST
THREE YEAR OLD ROAN SAD
dle horse with bald face, white
hind legs, dark brown spot on
back.
ranch at Presto.
Morris, Shelley, Idaho, Route 2,
Box 53, or McDonald's Real Estate
office, Blackfoot, and receive re
ward.
Strayed from Patterson
Notify E. P.
18a ?
STRAYED
FROM OUR FARM 1 OLD IRON
gray gelding, weight 1050. brand
circle X; 1 bay gelding coming 4
years, weight 1400, branded A Z
on left thigh; 1 bay gelding com
ing 5 years old, weight 1400,
branded A Z on left thigh. Notify
Republican office or Spencer.P.
Edwards at Mission of Good Shep
herd, Fort Hall.
19a-tf.
THERE IS AT Thi* ABRAHXM
Reesha pla<y, one and a half miles
southeast or -.aokfoot, one red
and white cow, branded on left
hip. Owner prove property and
pay damages and advertising and
take the cow away.
19a-tf
LOCAL NEWS
» l '» I -» I -+- l -* l -+- I -» I - I -» I -+- I -+' I '» t -» l -$
!
<>
Fred Hansen of Shelley spent the
week-end here visiting with friends.
Arnold Crystal left for Salt Lake
City Friday to remain indefinitely.
E. L. Anderson, who is in the hos
pital at Logan, is doing nicely.
Guy Stevens is ill with the influ
enza.
Mrs. Clinton Jensen of Basalt was
a Blackfoot visitor Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kirk were
business visitors here Thursday.
Life Insurance. Beebe, adv 165tf
C. VanDeusen v of Boise was a
Blackfoot visitor last week.
Walker Rich was a Pocatello busi
ness visitor Friday. *
Miss Wllkiif of Thomas spent Fri
day in Blackfoot shopping.
Mrs. Fred Montgomery has been
111 for the past week but 1 b mow able
to be around again.
Miss Delpha Montgomery has ac
cepted a. position at the Racket Store
during the holidays.
Books on the war at the public
library In the city ffkH at Blackfoot.
tf.
S. H. Jacobs returned home Fri
day from a few days' spent in the
Lost River country.
Miss Myrtle Webber of Challis
spent last week in Blackfoot visiting
friends.
Mrs. M. L. McCann of Idaho Falls
was a business visitor In Blackfoot
Thursday.
Mrs. Fannie Green left today for
Billings, where she will spend thf
winter with her brother Mr. Fullen.
J .J. Fearheller, auctioneer. Sat
Phone 3SW
adv. 18 tf.
I piiss Lucille Salley of Pocatello
^npent a few days of last week In
flpHackfoot visiting with friends.
I Walter Wensel of Lava Hot
Htorlngs was a business visitor in
^Blackfoot the last of the week.
I Mrs. J. F. Burn of Salt Lake spent
Hwednesday In Blackfoot the guest
Spit Mrs. M. Watson. Mr. and Mrs.
ffgl vfttHon accompanied Mrs. Burn as
IPpr as Pocatello on her return trip.
I' Mr. and Mrs. Swager of Mackay
Stopped over in Blackfoot Thursday
aighti and visited with friends. They
were on therl way toi Salt Lake by
way of automobile, where they will
spend tne winter. I
of
sfactlon guaranteed.
>r 252.
of
\
Mrs. Jess Sutton and children re
turned Thursday from Howe, Idaho.
M. L. Gillispie ot Idaho Falls was
down on business Wednesday.
Mrs. George Locey ,who has been
ill tor several weeks is improving.
William Taylor of Kimball was a
business visitor here Thursday.
Mrs. H. F. Siesser made a busl
Blackfoot visitor rriday.
La Fayette Rich was a business vis
itor here Saturday.
Miss Ida Berg of Basalt spent
Thursday in Blackfoot shopping.
Ray Kirk was a Blackfoot visitor
Friday.
Robert Frasure of Taber, was a
business visitor in Blackfoot the last
of the week.
Dr. Richards is able to be out and
around again after suffering an at
tack of the flu.
Don't forget the Spraker and Rob
bins big dale next Monday. See
page 8 for particulars.
Samuel Willis of Butte was a busi
ness visitor in Blackfoot the last
of the* week.
L. R. Adams left Thursday for
Butte, where he will spend a few
days attending to business matters.
Mrs. J. L. McGee arid family left
Thursday for Idaho Falls, where
they will make their future home.
Gordon Thompson returned* to
Blackfoot Thursday after a few days
visit with his sister in Pocatello.
D. A. Stone made a business trip
trip to Aberdeen the last of the
week.
Earl Rogers of Howe spent a few
days of last week in Blackfoot visit
ing with friends and relatives.
Francis Sanders of Pocatello whs
a business visitor in Blackfoot the
last of the week.
Mrs. 'W. E Rogers of Firth spent
Friday in Blackfoot attending to
business and viBiting with friends.
A. S. Kahn of Omaha was a busi
ness visitor in Blackfoot Thursday
afternoon.
Mrs. W. O. Bridges, who has been
ill with the influenza is able to be
out again.
M. B. Skaggs of Burley was a Black
foot visitor the last of the week look
ing over his business interests here.
Earle M. Garrett of Salt Lake was
a business visitor in Blackfoot the
last of the week.
-Mrs. Joseph E. Brown and Mrs.
Lucy M. Soule were passengers on
the morning train for Pocatello.
Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Jacobsen and
Mrs. Saunders motored to Pocatello
Thursday afternoon.
C. C. Hayes of Idaho Falls was a
business visitor in Blackfoot the last
ot the week.
Mr. Kirchner, who has been ill for
the past few days is now somewhat
improved.
Mrs. Leona Good went to Dillon,
Mont. Friday to visit with her daugh
ter Mrs. Bradley for a few weeks.
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Simmons and
family motored to Lava Hot Springs
Wednesday to attend the funeral ser
vices of a cousin.
Mrs. Aggie Cutler returned to her
home in Shelley Wednesday evening
after spending a few days in Black
foot.
the
re
IN
lamb
com
.
tf.
rea
adv 19a-2
sale
tf.
80
with
1,
19-2
and
bus
Ad
In
will
at
tf
IM
on
2,
re
P.
?
4
Z
Miss Lela Hutchinson and Mrs.
Leonard Davis spent Wednesday
evening In Idaho Falls visiting
friends.
Dr. and Mrs. Wheeler left Friday
for Spokane, Wash., where they will
visit for a month with Dr. Wheeler's
folks.
C. iv. Hendrie and son, Charles,
spent a few days the last of the week
in the Lost River country attending
to business matters.
Leo nansen and DeVere Mills of
Mt. Pleasant, Utah, spent a few days
the last of the week in Blackfoot
Visiting with friends.
Mrs. Alfreda Graff and Mrs. Ted
Green are spending a few days In
Rexburg, Idaho, visiting with Rela
tives ^pd friends.
Spence Eccles and Dave Rommney
returned to their home in Logan the
last of the week, after spending a
few days here visiting with friends.
Virgil Stephens returned to his
home in Springfield the first of the
week, after spending a few days in
Blackfoot visiting with friends. '
Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Wells and
.daughters, Eula and Anna, and Mrs.
Ison of ...ockford, were Blackfoot vis
itors Thursday.
ihe Misses Sarah and Anna iBon
and brother, Melvin, of Riverside,
were shopping In Blackfoot Thurs
day.'
-$
!
a
to
Miss Bessie Potter returned to
Fort Hall -nursday, after a short
vacation here. Miss Eleta Ison ac
companied her.
Mrs. Sarah Walker of Salt Lake,
was in Blackfoot Saturday on her
way to Aberdeen to visit a short
time with Mrs. Alice Stone .
Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Davis of Lost
Hiver, moved to Blackfoot the last
of the week and will live here during
the winter months.
Mrs. Bert Webb of Salt Lake ar
rived In Blackfoot Thursday even
ing, where she was called on ac
count of the death of her brother
David France.
Mrs. Nellie Caster and daughter,
Josephine, returned to their home in
Blackfoot Wednesday, after spending
several weeks at their farm In Crys
the
not
If
to
be
tal.
Harry Kinney, Miss Lucile Graham
and Mrs. E .J. Benson motored to
Roberts Friday morning, where they
attended the funeral services of Mrs.
Burggrafi
Mr. and Mrs. D. LaFever and
grandson, and air. and Mrs. Chas.
LaFever, Jr. and family of Lost
River, came to Blackfoot the last
of the week and wnl remain here
during the winter.
Wayne Fulmer returned to Black
foot Saturday, after a week spent at
Shelley.
ten Waterloo returned to his
home in Arco. He has been to Chi
cago with several carloads of sheep.
Mrs. Mira ojhnson of Moreland,
spent Saturday in Blackfoot shop
ping and visiting with friends.
Mrs. Walter Latie of Shelley was
a business visitor in Blackfoot the
last of the week.
C. O. Veness of Chicago spent a
few days of last week in Blackfoot
attend.^ gto business matters.
Mrs. — Volpert and uaughter Ella
spent Saturday in Pocatello visiting
with friends. •
Frank Abbott of Pocatello was a
business visitor in Blackfoot the last
of the week.
Lnarles McDonald made ^ busi
ness trip to Sterling tue last of the
veek.
Miss Nell ^.renshaw spent last
week visiting at the Judge Doud
home in the country.
Mrs. irj.. '-. Siesser made a busi- a
ness trip to Camas, Idaho, Wednes-*
day, returning Friday.
Albert Whitten made a business
trip to Idaho Falls the latter part of
the week.
.
>
u Mrs. H. C. i Rich and
family were in Blackfoot Saturday
shopping.
E. R. Madsen made a business
trip to Salt Lake the first of the
week.
Miss Virginia Patterson of Shelley
spent a few days the last of the week
visiting friends In Blackfoot.
Word has been received that Harry
i-olden at Idaho Falls Is much Im
proved.
MIbs Martha Parry of Daniels,
Idaho spent a few days in Blackfoot
the last of the week.
Miss Affie Fisher, who has been
suffering with the influenza, is now
somewhat Improved.
Mrs. 0. B. Spraker and Louis Rob
bins expect to hold one of the largest
live stock auction sales ever held in
this valley on next Monday, Dec. 22,
at the Spraker farm west of Black
foot. See ad on page 8.
Mrs. L. N: Thorstenberg spent the
week-iend at the Blomqulst tyome
in Presto.
William' Wilkins of Thomas went
to Moscow to attend his son, who
is ill at that place and training at
the miltary school.
Mrs. Arve of Idaho Falls arrived
in Blackfoot Thursday, where she
was called on account of the death
of her brother David France.
Bring in your spuds. We are pre
pared to hapdle them any time at
the highest market price.
Stone, phone 23, Clark Fuel & Ice
18tf.
Mr.
19n-2
D. A.
Co.
YOUNG CHECK ARTIST
Dave Martin, who lives several
miles northwest of Taber, but has
been farming on the Bitton ranch
during the summer, came to Black
foot Saturday and forged four checks
on farmers In that vicinity, for var
ious amounts from $7.00 to $25.00.
He is only seventeen years of age.
The checks were cashed at the
Golden Rule store and Rowles-Mack
and when young Martin made the
second attempt to cash a forged
.check as the Rowles-Mack Co., he
wgs detained there until the sheriff
was notified who took the young man
into custody. He is out on bonds at
the present time awaiting trial.

WHY DON'T YOU WRITE?
You are not writing to many
soldierB over there or anywhere else.
You are too busy. But that doesn't
take off the longing the soldier feels
for letters from folks at home. If
you haven't time to write, the editor
will take time. But send the ad
dresses of the boys In France or any
where in the service. The new regu
lations do not allow sending the
newspaper, but everybody from Per
shing down advises writing to the
boys, so write we will. •
If It <8 too much trouble to send
the address by mail, get the address
your hand and ring 45J; that's
the reporters' room at the Republi
can office and just say, ' 'Here Is
an address for you," and read it into
the phone till the reporter can read
back at you to see if it is copied
right and that soldier boy will re
ceive two letters that we know of.
We will publish his address, and he
may receive a flock of letters. They
say It Is very trying on a good soldier
boy to attend mall call day after day
and see the others receive their joy
and not get anything himself. The
soldier needs assurance from home,
and a letter touches the exact spot, tf
on
by
*
The German prqss is showing nat
ural repulsion to amputation, but it
will have to submit and without an
esthetics.—St. Louis Star.
Perhaps the Administration wishes
now it had let Colonel Roosevelt go
the front.—Pittsburg Gazette
Times. /
When you sneeze now nobody says,
"God bless you."—St. LOuls Star.
The Kaiser removed General von
Oven ffom Metz. The Yanks were
making It warm enough for- Metz
without General voff Oven.—Colum
Record.
When Wilyum began kicking the
world around careless like back yon
in 1914, we dessay he didn't
know how It was loaded.—'Columbia
Record.
ber
man
land
WE WANT THU REST
This office wants the addresses of
rest of the soldier boys, who
have gone from Bingham county. If
have an address that you have
sent us, that is the one we want.
all of the men in the service are
receive letters from some of their
friends before Christmas, and others
after Christmas, It is time for us to
at It. Please send us the ad
dresses and we Till publish them and
tirr*: 1 - *.o each of
Ring 45J or write the Re
tf. will
"Ir.'
them,
pnbllcan office.
at
his
Chi
was
the
a
Ella
a
last
the
last
a
of
TO BEGIN IT ONCE
8HIPMENT OF TROOPS ACROSS
ATLANTIC 8TOPPED AND B0Y8
TO BE 8ENT HOME.
Plans Announced by General March
Enable 200,00b Men to Return to
Civil Life Within the Next
Two or Three Weeks.
Washington.—Movement of Ameri
. can troops across the Atlantic hus
stopped entirely and demobilization of
troops in cantonments and camps at
home is under way.
General March, chief of staff, made
this announcement on Noveiffber-10,
outlining the war department's plhns
in answer to the questions the coun
> try has been asking since the day the
armistice was signed and It became ap
parent that the war was over. He said
orders already issued would send 200,
000 men back to civil life within two
weeks, and that when the program
was in full swing about 30,000 would
quit the army daily.
Fighting divisions of General Per
shing's ariny fa France will be de
mobilized as far as possible in their
home communities.
The chief of staff would make no
prediction as to when the first divi
sions would start home. It appears
probable, however, that the flow of re
turning troops can be In full tide be
fore February 1. Quarters will be
available for them at the cantonments
by that time.
Some officers regard It ns possible
that certain divisions may be recalled
in advance of the general return move
ment. General March indicated that
the Forty-second (Rainbow) division,
because it Is composed of men from
twenty-six states and in recognition of
the fighting record it has made In
France, would be marked for special
treatment. The Twenty-sixth (New
England national guard), and the
Forty-first (Sunset) divisions are In the
same class, so it would not cause
surprise, therefore, If these three or
ganizations should be designated by
General Pershing as the first to re
turn. With six weeks of 1918 left, it
Is possible they may be home before
New Year's day.
Supplementing
statement, Secretary Baker said It
would not be necessary to maintain all
the existing cantonments for demobil
ization purposes and that a study was
now being made of those desirable for
that purpose. The others, with all the
divisional camps, he Indicated, will be
abandoned as soon as the men now oc
cupying them have been mustered out.
lie demobilization will be carried
out In the following order:
First, development battalions, sev
enty-one in number, and comprising
men.
Second, conscientious objectors not
under arrest.
Third, spruce production division.
Fourth, central training schools for
officers, with some modifications.
Fifth, United States guards, now
numbering 135,000 men.
Sixth, railway units.
Seventh, depot brigades.
Eighth, replacement units.
Ninth, combat divisions.
in
General March's
WAR LOAN OVER SEVEN BILLION.
Every Reserve District Exceeded Its
Quota in Recent Campaign.
Washington.—Total .subscriptions to
the fourth Liberty*loan were -$6,989,
047,000, the treasury department an
nounced Tuesday, after final tabula
tions had been completed. The over
subscription of $989,047,000 was 10.48
per cent. Every federal reserve dis
trict exceeded Its allotted quota.
This makes the fourth Liberty loan
by far the greatest war loan ever
floated by this or any other govern
ment. Including the four Liberty loans,
all of which were oversubscribed, and
war savings, the nation has raised
$17,852,000,000 In popular loans, not
including oversubscriptions which were
not accepted.
Fire Destroys Montana Mission.
Great Falls, Mont.—St. Peter's mis
sion, located In the Rocky mountains
on the road between Great Falls and
Helena, was burned to the ground
early Sunday morning. Seven Ursu
line sisters with forty-two Indian chil
dren from 4 to 14 years of age, oc
cupied the building. The children
were saved with the utmost difficulty
by the seven women. The mission
was established by the Jesuits more
than fifty years ago and comprises a
farm of over 3000 acres.
Priority Lumber Rate.
Washington.—To allow work to be
started on railroad construction de
layed by the war, the war Industries
board has Issued an order giving lum
ber shipments for railroads a priority
rating higher than that accorded any
other class of commodities.
for
of
Ex-Empress to Go to Holland.
London.—The former German em
press and the wife of the former Ger
man crown prince will leave for Hol
land in a few days on a special train
provided by the workmen and soldiers'
council.
shal
Will Ship Food to Germana
London.—The British government Is
arranging for the departure to the
United States of *. number of German
/essels for the purpose of bringing to
Jermany foodstuffs which the allies
will permit Germany to receive.
SEVENTY-ONE SHIPS OF ALL
* CLA88E8 GIVEN UP FOR
INTERNMENT.
A Line of Allied Warships Fifty Miles
Long, and Including Five Big
American Warships, Took
Part in Ceremony.
hus
of
at
the
ap
de
no
re
be
of
In
it
It
London.—The bulk and pride of the
German navy surrendered fifty miles
off the coast of Scotland between 9:30
and 10 o'clock Thursday morning, No
vember 21. It included seventy-one
ships of all classes, Including destroy
ers. The surrender went off according
to plan. British war ships escorted the
German craft Into the Firth of Forth,
where Internment was begun at 1:45
p. m.
Three Vessels Lacking
The German surrendering fleet was
short three vessels, namely, one battle
ship, one cruiser and one light cruiser.
It was explained these would be de
livered later.
Among the seventy-one vessels sur
rendered were seven batleshlps, five
battle cruisers and seven light cruis
ers, the remainder being destroyers.
The three vessels that were scheduled
to give up but did not appear are being
repaired, It was explained.
King George, the prince of Wales
and Admiral Sims were aboard Ad
mlral Sir David Beatty's flagship, the
superdreadnaught Queen Elizabeth, to
gether with many British and Ameri
can notables witnessing the Impressing
naval display. A line of allied war
ships fifty miles long and Including
five big American greyhounds, took
part In the ceremony. Altogether
there were about 500 allied and Ameri
can war craft In the "reviewing
stand."
About the same time the big sur
face fleet was delivered, the British
forces'from Harwich steamed out to
meet the second batch of U-boats. One
of the German submarines was dis
abled en route.
The rendezvous between the victors
and the' vanquished took place near
May Island. Rear Admiral Sinclair led
the German fleet between lines of the
British grand fleet and the allied anu
American vessels, which convoyed the
Germans to their harbor of Internment
like armed guards marching convicts
to their cells.
The weather was favorable. Man'
big airplanes hovered overhead as the
"eyes of the fleet." The Germans cam.
with full crews aboard. It Is under
stood that Admiral Befltty refused i
German request that the German crews
be permitted to stay aboard the ships
at the point of surrender.
CONGRES8 TAKES RECESS.
Lawmakers Have Vacation Until
December 2.
Washington.—The second Session of
the Sixty-fifth, or "war" congress
which began last December 3, ended a:
5 p. in. Thursday, November 21, under
a resolution which had been adopted
earlier In the day by the senate, 41 to
18, and by the house without objection.
Since the third and final session of
this congress will begin In eleven days
—December 2—the adjournment was
devoid of many of the spectacular
features usually accompanying the end
ing of sessions.
President Wilson did not go to the
capitol because no legislation requir
ing his action was passed by either
body, and only small groups of mem
bers und spectators waited for the fall
ing of the gavels of Vice-President
Marshall and Speaker Clurk.
JUDGE TO AID MOONEY.
Man Who Sentenced Him Aaks for
New Trial.
San Francisco.—The efforts being
made to save Thomas J. Mooney from
the gallows was marked here Thursday
by the publication of a letter from
Superior Judge Franklin A. Griffin,
who tried and sentenced Mooney, to
Governor Stephens, asking a new trial
for Mooney because of alleged evi
dences of a fraud conspiracy against
him. The letter was written on No
vember 19. Its receipt In Sacramento
was acknowledged by Governor Ste
phens, who would make no comment.
Parliament Prorogued.
London.—Parliament was prorogued
Thursday, file king's speech read by
commission, owing to his absdhce In
Scotland, expressed "humble thanks to
Almighty God for the success with
which It has pleased him to crown our
arms."
England's Loss by Air Raida.
London.—England's bill to Germany
for damage done by air raids Is author
itatively stated to amount to $3,385,000.
The totals of air raid victims are:
Killed, 488; Injured, 1104; total, 1502.
Powder Plant to Close.
Petersburg, Va.—The Dupont power
plant at Hopewell is to be shut down
and all production cut off, It was of
ficially announced here Thursday. Fif
teen thousand men will be thrown out
of employment.
Foch Statue Proposed.
Washington.—A resolution author
izing the erection of a statue to Mar
shal In Washington and appropriating
SI(8),000 for the purpose, was Intro
duced In the house Thursday by Repre
sentative SInnott of Cfregon.
Red + ers
(By Mrs. Byrd Trego)
Mrs. Robins asked that you be told
ther were eighty hurry-up garments
to be made. She mentioned care
fully the name by which they were
called, but alas, we've forgotten it.
However it was hospital something
and probably wanted for use«in Am
erica when the wounded men get
here who are now being brought as
rapidly as possible. We hope you
will go to the rooms and ask for one
or more to make, but please do think
it is necessary to tell Mrs. Robina
about the writer forgetting the name.
It surely is some soft, fleecy stuff
easily handled.
Other work on hand at present is
Belgian women dresses, knitting
sweaters with beautiful yarn and
some surgical dressing work to com
plete with little blessing Christmas
boxes coming and going.

OARS SOLD LAST WEEK.
Bills garage sold cars to the fol
lowing peopel last week:
New white wheeled model Ford,
Mrs. Thomas Mazeuyer of Fort Hall;
George Lufkin of Shelley; Vernal
Poulsen, Shelley; Dr. Wheeler of
Blackfoot, and V. A. Merritt of Pln
gree.
Miss Cora Hull has accepted a po
sition at the White Transfer office,
Miss Lenora Jordon, who has been
working there for the past few
®onths, has resigned and Is assist
ing at the office of J. Benson, county
treasurer.

• ACCEPTED A POSITION

RETURNS FROM NEBRASKA
Miss Anna Doyle returned to
Blackfoot Thursday, after spending
the past few weeks in Nebraska vis
iting with friends and relatives
Miss Doyle returned to resume
her duties as principal at the Central
school.

MARIAN JUST ILL/
Miss Marian Just, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Fran* Jus* of Presto, Is
seriously 111. Miss Just has been in
poor health for somt time.
Mr. and Mrs. Just leave the first
ot the week tor California whore
teoy will take her for her Health.

VISIllNG HERE.
J. T. Johnsop, who 1 b now em
ployed at Dubois, Idaho, as book
keeper at the lumber company, is
spending a few days here visiting
with his mother and friends.
DEATH OF MRS. V. A. BIDINGER.
Mrs. Jbidinger, wife of V. A. Bidin
'ger, died at five o'clock Sunday
morning at, their home west of the
Sugar Factory, influenza being the
cause.
The funeral will be conducted
from me home on Tuesday afternoon
at two o'clock. Rev. Father Fuchs
of the Catholic church officiating.
-•
ILL WITH INFLUENZA.
• Harry Kinney, of the Kinney Mer
cantile company, is 111 with the in
fluenza.
At last reports he was getting
along nicely.
-♦
The Misses Neoml Ridd, Reva Ja
cobs, Grace Babbitt, and Loa Mar
tin, spent .Sunday in Pocatello.
Miss uutora cSi.
week-end with Mil
the country.

Mrs. Oscar L. Rider is very 111
with the influenza.
nri Arq on spent the
DoHp^ofkii in
SS

BUCKS FOR SALE
I have sixty-five Hampshire yearl
ing bucks for sale.
Pingree, Idaho.
H. C. C, Rich,
adv. 15-tf.
'"WHEJXeR YOUD 6R0W
k P AT OR THINNER,
^ HERE'S THE
P\.ACE<To
Buy your
'DINNER. \
V(
cec
NO, IT ISN'T AT ALL
a question of avoirdupois-inten
tions.
reduce your weight or increase
It, we're certain that you .want
to keep your health up to par.
One good health measure you
Bhould put Into effect at once Is
the purchase of meats at thla
sanitary shop of satisfaction.
Whether you want to
CENTRAL MEAT MARKET
The CkialitT Shop
L. B: DORE & SONS
Gub Cafe
OPEN AGAIN
I have purchased the Club Cafe
and removed It to DeKay's
Cigar Store... Try it.
BIGGER, BETTER,
BRIGHTER
ROY S. DeKAY

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