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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, November 26, 1918, Image 8

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1918-11-26/ed-1/seq-8/

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UNENS FOR THE
Thanksgiving Table
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B
With Thanksgiving so near and Christmas not
far off, the demand for household linens is at its
height.
We have a big diversified stock which will meet
your every requirement. Only thoroughly reliable
I grades, and because we bought them long ago,
the prices are-most reasonable.
LINENS ARE SPLENDID AND USEFUL CHRISTMAS PRE
SENTS
/
58 inch mecerized damask..
72 inch mercerized damask.
60 inch part linen damask..
70 inch pure linen damask.
70 inch pure linen plain satin damaslf
Napkins from ..
.65c yd.
$1.00 yd.
. .$1.00 yd.
- .$2.00 yd.
. $3.00 yd.
$1.50 to $10.00 a dozen
/ime ix> start
%
We have a complete line of Japanese
blue and white cloths and napkins that
are fast colors and very durable, and the
prices are reasonable.
to r.„. __
jjour Christmas
M;
hritfmajl
Ihoppiift
The Brown-Hart Co.
. "The Home of Popular Prices.
C Jb> -
* 9
December-1* m d visit our Bargain base
I --- __ • MENT AND SEE THE TOYS
Livestock Sale
At the Mrs. O. B. Spraker farm, seven miles
West of Blackfoot and two miles west of Riverside
Monday, Dec 2
BEGINNING AT 10:30 A. M. •
8 WORK HORSES
8 head good young horses -tnd mares, draft bred.
112 HEAD OF CATTLE
44 head are dairy cows and heifers from two to seven years, Holstein, Jersey,
Airshire, and all Bred to Durham bulls. Some coming fresh, some fresh and
calves by their side. 1 Holstein bull, 2 Durham bulls, 22 head two-year-old
steers, 43 head two and three-year-old Durham heifers all bred to Durham bull.
100 DUROC JERSEY HOGS
Weight from 85 to 125 pounds. An extra nice bunch. Sold in lots of five
to ten.
TERMS OF SALE: 11 months time at 10 per cent interest, or 5 per cent
discount for cash.
FREE LUNCH AT NOON
Everybody will be there; you come, too.
*
Mrs.O.B.Spraker and Louis Robbins '
E. M. KENNEDY, Auc OWNERS
L.C. COLLINS, Clerk
FRENCH BO! IS
REAL WAII HERO
Bears Excruciating Pain Without
Word of Complaint.
UG BONE IS SNAPPED OFF
Eleven-Year-Old Youth la Hit by Dia
patoh Rider on Motorcyel
Cry Out of Him aa Automobile
Daahea Over Rough Roada to Taka
Him to Hoapltal—Example of Hun
11 Savagery in Bombing of Commercy.
§| He la only eleven years old but the
|j| entire battlefields of Europe have fali
gj ed to produce a bigger hero.
Hi I I came across him the other day
H wW1 e on my way to Saint Mihlel, dur
H Ing Which I noticed a.crowd in the
gi | road near Pagny sur Meuse. A dough
boy stepped from the crowd and
stopped our car, saying that
American motorcycle dispatch rider
had struck a child and broken his leg.
He also explained 'that the rider had
sustained a dislocated shoulder.
There were no hospitals or doctors
In the town, so we stopped and I told
him the D. R. I. would take him back
to Toni to the hospital. He asked me
If I would deliver his dispatches and
when I told him I could not, he
fused to go to the hospltaL
Gives First Aid.
So the chauffeur, the doughboy and
.ayself got hold of him, wedged him
against the car qnd pulled on his left
arm until we snapped It back in the
socket •/
I got him some cognac from a
Frenchwoman. He took a drink,
finally got on his motorcycle and rode
HI on slowly.
Then I looked at the boy, a French
i kid abont eleven years old. His right
I leg bone was snapped off clean as a
whistle Just below the thigh, so that |t
wabbled around. His poor old father
was standing there helpless, and beg
ged that I wouldn't leave the child
there helpless "comme unchien," like
a dog in the road.
So we put the lad in the car and
rushed him to the Toul hospital. It
must have caused him excrnclating
pain as we dashed over the road but
never a word of complaint, although
in the front seat I could hear him
sucking In his breath sharply from the
torture of the broken ends of the bone
rubbing against one another.
I He was' as tthlte as marble. We
put him 111 the hospital at Toni. I
then went on to Saint Mihlel, and as
I was passing through the buckle of
the Meuse river southwest of the
town where It Is low and flat and was
formerly "no man's land," covered
with barbed wire, an American avia
tor, Lieut. Palmer Galllard of Mobile,
who knows my grandfather, stepped
ont and asked me where he was.
Knew It Was All Right
He had been forced to land through
engine trouble and was not sure
whether he was in the allied or Ger
man lines, but when he saw a car
marked "U. S.," he knew it was all
right He was a long way from an
inhabited town, as the nearest ones, a
couple of kilometers away, had been
shelled to pieces, and he couldn't talk
French, so was In a bad position.
I picked him up and we went to
Saint Mihlel. It was Just getting
dark, and the Boche bombed na there,
at Commercy, going back, at Void, at
Pagny, and at Toni again, where I
dropped him and I ran Into a raid get
ting back to Nancy. Six raids In
one night is a record, I guess.
We stopped outside Commerjy while
they were bombing It, then running
through we could smell powder wher
ever a bomb struck.
They were taking a dead child out
of one house and dragging a wounded
woman ont of the cellar of another.
Not a
an
re
a
WAR MOTHERS ORGANIZE
Taka That Title for National Society
of Relatives of Fighters.
"War Mothers of America" Is the
name % officially chosen by the first na
tional convention of the organization
at Evansville, Ind., after a spirited
contest. The constitution provides
that Evansville shall be tbe national
headquarters of the organization.
Only the mother or wif
dler or sailor "who has' been or Is In
active military service of the United
States of America tta the prosecution
of the great war," are entitled to mem
bership. Thtrty-one states are repre
sented In the convention, which Is ex
pected to complete Its work tonight
e of a sol
WOMEN TAKE MEN'S JOBS
Relieve Men of Military Age In Lon
don Business Houses.
One of the wholesale dry goods
houses of the city of London affords
an interesting example of the extent to
which the snbstltntlons of womeri'work
ers for men of military age can be car
ried out. Over fifty members of the
staff of this firm have joined the forces
and In practically every case women
have taken their places for the dura
tion of the war. The wives of the
commercial travelers who have been
called up, are taking their husbands'
places—on the road—and In addition
to the all-woman clerical staff, women
porters and women packers are being
employed with highly satisfactory re
sults.
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THANKSGIVING
IS HERE
and without some of the follow
ing your dinner will not be
complete.
VEGETABLES
Fancy head let uce, large crisp celery, radishes,
green onions, parsley, cucumbers, spinach, arti
choctes, wax beans, green peppers, cauliflower,
sweet potatcs, pumpkin, squash, tomatoes.
FRUITS
Large ripe cranberries, oranges, bananas, ap
ples, grapes, grapefruit.
We also have a large supply of fancy citron
peel, lemon peel, orange peel, glacied cherries,
candied pineapple, dates, figs, nuts of all kinds,
canned plum pudding, fig pudding, mince meat.
Bybee's Grocery
Phone 167
Phone 167
ORDINANCE NO. 221
An ordinance to license and regu
late the business of home portraiture
In the City of Blackfoot, and pro
viding a penalty for violation
thereof.
Be it ordained by the mayor and
council of the City of Blackfoot,
Idaho:
Section. 1. It shall be unlawful
for any person, firm, or corporation
to engage in the home portraiture
business within the City of Black
foot without first obtaining a license
from said city so to do.
Sec. 2. Home portraiture busi
ness, within the meaning and for the
purposes of this ordinance, is hereby
defined to be the drawing of protralts
or the taking or making of photo
graphs within the residence, apart
ment, home, or living rooms of any
person or persons for whom such
work Is done. \
Sec. 3. Any person, firm, or cor
poration desiring to engage in the
'home portraiture business within
the City of Blackfoot shall first ob
tain from the chief of police a license
for such business, and shall pay
therefor the following fee or fees,
to wit: For a license covering a per
iod of one month of any part thereof
the sum of $25.00; for a license cov
ering a period of more than one
month and not more than one year,
the sum of $75.00.
Sec. 4. Any person who shall en
gage in the home protraiture busi
ness within the City of Blackfoot
without first obtaining a license
therefor sha.i be deemed guilty of
misdemeanor and upon conviction
thereof, shall be puifished by a fine
any sum not exceeding $100.09.
Passed and approved, and adopted
this twentieth - day of November,
1918.
Public Sale
Wei, the undersigned, will sell at public auction at the old Red Barn
on
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29
Beginning at 1.80 Sharp

13 HEAD HORSES
i pair geiaings, o years oiu, weigni awu; i pair geldings, s years
old, weight 2600; 1 gelding, 8 years old, weight 1800; 1 mule, O
yean old, weight 000; 1 bay team, mare and gelding, 7 and 8 years
old, weight 8800; 1 roan gelding, 7 yean old, weight 1200; 1 gray
mare, 7 years old, weight 1100; 1 sorrel mare, 12 years old, weight
1000; 1 bay gelding, 4 years old, weight 1100; 1 bay gelding, 8 years
old, weight 1000.
CATTLE
5 good milk cows and a 2 year old Durham heifer Just fresh; 2
2 year old steers and one yearling; 2 yearling heifers and 4 calves;
2 dozen chickens.
FARM IMPLEMENTS
4 sets of heavy work harness; 1 set lead harness; 1 set driving 1 har
ness; 1 8H John Deer wagon, 3-lnch tire; 1 3)4 Studebaker wagon,
wide tire; 1 3)4 Studebaker wagon, two inch tire; 1 new Studebaker
buggy with pole and fills; 1 John Deer 2-way plow; 1 beet rack; 1
wyod rack; 1 5-foot Deerlng mower; 1 10-foot rake; 1 2-section
harrow; 1 potato planter; 1 potato cultivator; 1 manure spreader;
1 beet puUer; 1 set bob sleds; 1 fresno; 1 tongue scraper: 2 liay
racks; 1 14-inch walking plow; 1 ditcher; 1 Daisy Maid cream
separator, 2 beet cultivators; 3 Ford 5-passenger cars and 1 6-cylin
der, 5 passenger Buick; cither articles too numerous to mention.
■ TERMS:.. All sums under $10.00, cash; over that amount a credit of
ten months will be given on approved notes drawing 10 per cent
Interest, 5 per cent off for cash.
Buchanan, Moyer, Conklin
N. E. MONTGOMERY, Auct
J. B. DeHART, Clerk.
A. B. STEPHENS,
Mayor.
Attest:
ROY S .DeKAY,
City Clerk.
19 a-l
STERLING
i 4- i -4- l - »? ' » H - ! -4- H -4 - l -4- l -4- i -» W
Miles F. Reed of Pocatello, presi
dent of the Idaho Tech., and known
as a prominent educator thruout
Idaho, died very suddenly here Fri
day. Mr. Reed in company with
some other men from Pocatello, came
over early Friday morning on a hunt
ing trip. The party went in differ
ent directions. Mr. Reed accompan
ied by one other gentleman, went
down near the home of Dick Driscoll
and had just raised his gun to shooi
a duck when he fell back dead, due
to heart failure. The body was tak
en to Pocatello.
All of the flu patients are recov
ering nicely except the Charlie Par
sons' family, who are reported to be
very 111. •
William Greenwood left Friday
on a business trip to Salt Lake City.
!
*
i
I
ILL WITH INFLUENZA
Word has been received here that
Harry Holden is very ill with the in
fluenza at his home in Idaho Falls.
At last reports he was getting
along as well as could be expected.

BCSINES VISITOR HERE
E. M. Garrett, luberioatlng en
gineer for the Continental Oil com
pany of Salt Lake was a business vis
itor at the Sugar factory Friday, re
turning Saturday, \

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