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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, December 03, 1918, Image 1

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OFFICIAL PAPER OF CITY AND QOUNTY
Vol. XV. No. 2C*A
BLACKFOOT, BINGHAM COUNTY, IDAHO, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1918
$3 a Year
JOSEPH C. WALTERS
KILLED IN FRANCE
after several months of
SEVERE FIGHTING LIFE IS
TAKEN. TWO BROTHERS ALSO
IN FRANCE.
Mrs. Jane Walters of Blackfoot
has been officially Informed that her
son Private Joseph C. Walters, was
killed In battle in France, Novem
ber 1 .
Mr. Walters left Blackfoot in one
of the first draft contingents, and
after training at Camp Lewis was
sent to France In July, arriving over
seas July 23. At the time of his
death he was twenty-two years of
age.
Mr. Walters saw much active ser
vice at the front from the time he
reached the battle land. His young
life went out bravely just before the
taming of peace and freedom for
which he has so willingly sacrificed
his all.
Mr. Walters was a splendid young
man of good habits and character
and to know him was to like him.
He Is survived by a mother, father,
ten sisters and brothers,
brothers are at the front In France
and another brother is in a training
camp in the states.
Two
-W
GERMAN HORDES
RUIN FACTORIES
PARIS, Nov. 28.—Details of the
systematic sequeestration or destruc
tion of machinery in the French fac
tories In the Brley valley region is
given by the correspondent at Brley
of Le Journal.
All stocks of merchandise, iron
ore, cast iron and steel were requisi
tioned by German inspectors and en
gineers the. oorrespondent says, and
then fifteen officers and 100 men ar
rived to organize the destruction of
the plants. German manufacturer's
visited the region and picked out
certain pieces of machinery which
* they wished placed In their own
plants, and these were shipped Im
mediately to Germany.
After these selections had been
made and demolition of blast fur
naces, steam engines, boilers, tools,
gearings and electric light fixtures
not connected with the actual work
ing of the mines was carried out, the
employees of the plants being com
pelled to aid the Germans in their
devastation.
In the meantime, the exploitation
cf the mines was kept in full swing.
Prisoners to the number of 15,
000 were put to work with hardly
any rest and under terrible discipline.
The output of the mines ■'was larger
than In peace times, and the corre- .
spondent adds, this enabled thej 1
/ p ° wer ' *° "? 001 ,or ,our |
Wi.n th. tor th. .mod
tack approached the Germans con
centrated 600 heavy guns and 7000...
machine guns for the defense of the
Brley region, but the heroism of the ,
allied troops rendered these precau -1 f
lions useless and the Teuton dream 1 J,
of universal domination was shat
tered
CLEAR ITALIAN LEGISLA
TORS OF ANARCHY TAINT
ROME,—Assertions were made
November 23 in the lower house of
the Italian parliament that proofs
had been secured that several sena
tors and deputies were involved in
pacifist and anarchistic activities
which resulted In the Oaporetto dis
aster.
Premier Orlando supported the
proposed appointment of a special In
vestigation committee of seven mem
bers. Such a resolution was adopted
and- a committee was appointed, but
after examining documents in the
hands of secret service, men, the
members stated they were unable to
decide whether or not the-accusation
was Justified.
Later, however, after a close ex
amination of the documents, which
had been submitted by Deputy Cen
turione, the president of the com
mittee announce*- that body had
come unanimously to the opinion
that the charges were unfounded.
The president of the chamber de
clared he had no words to stigma
tize the conduct of Deputy Centurione
in bringing baseless charges. The
remark was greeted with thunders
of applause and shouts of "Throw
him out." The president urged the
reputlese to be calm, saying It was
for the electors to do the turning
out.
at
ton
DRIED FRUITS IN
STEAD OF CANDY
•Home cook-Btove dryers In Ore
gon are considered a very necessary
piece of furniture by the women In
home-demonstration agent counties,
where they have learned of the many
In one section dainty boxes
uses.
of home-dried fruits have been pre
pared for Christmas gifts to send to
the boys In camps and at the front.
Instead of candy the children of
thiB same section use the dried fruits
to satisfy their natural craving for
sweets.

low
the
O.
BOCHE SOLDIERS ASK BRUTISH
CIVILIANS TO PLEAD FOR THEM
HULL.—British civilian prisoners
arriving here from Ruhleben, Ger
many, says that when they were
leaving the prison camp there a
long written document was handed
them by the Germans, appealing to
them to Intercede with th* British
people In behalf of the people of Ger
many, who "have freed themselves
from the chains of a barbarous sys
tem," and not to hold the Germans
responsible for the deeds of their
former autocratic rulers, "who are
now utterly powerless."
Is
t * + +4444444444 + + +1
THE ALLOP.
*
4
4
4
4
4
4 'With Foch the gre.t contriver, 4
4 With Haig the big Hun driver, 4
v Pershing as chief adviser,
v And God as rebaptizer,
4 We've walloped the kaiser. 4
4
4 Thru glacier and thru geyser, 4
. Down rathole and up riser, 4*
4 Where flow the Rhine and Isar, 4
. Danube and old Budweiser, 4
+ We've walloped the kaiser. 4*
4 4
4 In spite of slack'and miser, 4*
4* Plus alien sympathiser,
4* O'er Bill atbd Ebeneizer,
4* Helmet, moustache and visor, 4*
4- We ve walloped the kaiser. 4*
4*
4* So take his goat and slice hdfr, 4>
v Then ram it thru a dicer,
4- With sauerkraut for a spicer, 4*
4- Limburg to tone it nicer,
4- We've walloped the kaiser. 4
4* <
v All hands on deck! aye, aye, sir! 4*
4* Come quaft an appetizer;
4* Make it a paralyzer—
4- By Caeser's ghost capizer 4
4* We've walloped the kaiser. 4
James L. King. 4
4* v
44444444444444444
of
IS
4
4
4
her
was
one
and
was
his
of
4
4
ser
he
the
for
4
4
4
4
4
4
a
of
ipf
a
4
$0,572,000,000 U. S. EXPENSES
FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30
WASHINGTON.—It cost $5,645,
000,000 to run the American army
-during the year ending June 30 last;
$1,368,000,000 for the navy and $1,
516,000,000 for tlie civil government
proper. The slipping board spent
$862,000,000 and $181,000,000 was
paid out In pensions.
These figures are shown Friday by
the annual report of John Burke,
treasurer of the United States, to
Secretary McAdoo. The report
showed the public debt on June 30
was $12,396,000,000.
the
is
en
ar
of
. . . , . „ . . ,
thej 1 ?®*- The bakers in all the principal
| S"o .grVa w!;h".B c JSJ takm
'ducts of the bakers of the state was

TROUBLE OVER BREAD
PRICES NOT SETTLED
POCATELLO, Ida.—The grievance
between the Idaho food adminis
tration and the bakers of the state
has come to a standstill, pending in
structions from Washington, sought
by Food Administrator R. F. Bick
nell.
The trouble arose over the an
nouncement by the master bakers
that the price of bread would be
raised over the price fixed some
months ago by the state food admin
istration of 9 cents wholesale and
10 cents retail for the sixteen-ounce
loaf to 11 cents wholesale and 12 ^
cents rbtail for the sipcteen-ounce
In
and
eral
7000... . . .. . .. .. ,
threatened thru the action of the
.state food administration. How
, . ,
-1 f ver ,- *°° d ^"'"'stnitor decided
1 J, 0 . let ,, th i n £ s 8tand th ®.. ^ ay tb ®
bake " bad f tbem fl / ed he could
get instructions from Washington,
hav.ng appealed to the enforce
ment division of the federal food ad
ministration regarding the contro
versy.
BRITISH LOSSES BY DEATH
IN WAR NEARLY MILLION
LONDON.—It is officially an
nounced that during the war the
forces of Great Britian actually lost
nearly 1 , 000,000 men killed or dead
thru various causes.
Recently it was stated that the
British losses totaled 658,704 ,but
this number did not take into con
sideration mefT who were reported
missing, who actually lost their lives,
but of whom there is no trace, nor
did it account for men who died at
the front from sickness.
the
by
the
the
of
ENJOYED
THANKSGIVING DINNER
The
and
Dr. and Mrs. Patrie entertained
at a family Thanksgiving dinner at
their home on 279 Alice street,
Thursday evening, which was en
joyed by the following:
Mrs. Frank Arthur, Mr. and Mrs. J.
Hopkins and" son Arthur, Mr. and
Mrs. Otis Miller and son Raymohd,
Mrs Elizabeth Miller and Walter
Patrie Jr.
Mr. and
FRED KENNEDY HEARD FROM
Word has been received In Black
foot of the safe arrival of Fred Ken
hedy in Paris, France. Mr. Kennedy
left here some time ago, and entered
Into Red Cross work overseas. He
stateB that they had a very exciting
trip over, and that he has visited
Liverpool, London and South Hamp
ton since his arrival.
While in Paris he met Luther
King, one of Blackfoot's boys who
left here when war first broke out,
and who Is with the hospital corp
"over 'there." »
Fred expects to be stationed at
Tours, France permanently.
sity
iam
son
of
here
last

ENTERTAINED AT DINNER
week
third
has
at
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Barrer enter
tained at a Thanksgiving dinner, at
their home on 387 N. Shilling Ave..
The table was decorated with yel
low chrysanthums and the favors
were individual paper baskets.
Dinner was served at 4 o'clock to
the following people: v Mr. and Mrs.
O. Buchanan and family, the Misses
Wood, Schroder and Henley.

the
of
on
who
ing
H. B. KINNEY IMPROVING
Harry Kinney, who has been 111
with the Influenza for the past week,
Is now' much Improved. Mr. Klnnev
expects to be able to resume his
duties at the store in a few days.
+1
* Around the Court House
4
The following cases were brought
up for consideration at the present
session of court:
State vs. Roy 0 .Graff, the defend
ant plead not guilty, for the selling
of mortgaged property.
State vs. Frank Martin, the de
fendant plead guilty, for grand lar
ceny of cattle, and is in the custody
of the sheriff. Sentence will be pro
nounced later.
State vs. William Thompson, the
case' was 'dismissed by motion of the
prosecuting attorney, the defendant
having died before the preliminary
hearing was held.
State vs. S. W. Gibbs for the, un
lawful possession of liquor, was fined
Uuo.oo.
State vs. D. E. Bennett entered a
plea of guilty of the unlawful pos
session of liquor and was fined $ 100 .
State vs. Joe Torres, for burglary
of the Cash store, entered a plea of
not guilty.
Judge Cowen postponed the call
for a jury until the influenza situ
tion is improved, unless a trial is de
manded no jury win be called and
the cases will be continued for the
term.
4
4
4
4
4
4*
4
4
4*
4
4*
4*
4*
4>
4*
4
4*
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Mexican Arrested
Joe Velaskez, a Mexican, was ar
rested by the sheriff Friday for hav
ing eight pints and four one-half
pints of liquor In his possession.
Velaskez plead guilty and was fined
$o 0.00 and thrity days in jail.
Warrants Issued
Three warrants were issued last
week against * people who issued
checks on the local banks without
sufficient funds to cover same.
Commissioners Met
The county commissioners and
county health officer Dr. Hoover held
a special meeting Saturday to con
sider some new regulations pretain
lng to the influenza situation.
Considering Water Case
J. H. Peterson, former attorney
general of Idaho, William Story Jr.
of Salt Lake, M. H. Woods, president
ipf the Blain county Irrigation com
pany, W. H. Broad head of Mackay
and J. H. Anderson of Blackfoot held
a conference at the court house Fri
day in connection with litigation
growing out of the Little Lost river
Carey project.
Court Adjourned Until Dec. 23
The district court adjourned Sat
urday, on account of the influenza
epidemic, and will continue the pre
sent term of court on December 23.
4
30
$1,
by
to
30
,
in
be
^
ENEMY ALIEN JUMPS
FROM TRAIN; ESCAPES
Word was received in Salt. Lake
late Friday night to the effect that
..olfgang Thiele, an enemy alien;
destined for internment in the war
prison camp at Fort Douglas, had
jumped from a rapidly moving train
In tue vicinity of Los Cerrillos, N. M.,
and escaped In the darkness.
Thiele, with several other enemy
aliens, was being transferred from
Fort Bliss, Tex., to Fort Douglas, the
prisoners being under escort of sev
eral soldiers. Ji *:t how the man
eluded his guards is not known.
Following a brief search for hte fu
gitive, theh message . added, the
guards and the remaining'prisoners
continued on their journey after no
t.fying tne sheriff of Santa Fe oounty,
where the escape occured.
a
,
®
\

the
the
RECEIVED AN IRON CROSS
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Good have re
ceived a German iron cross from
their son Donald, while he was at
the front with the machine gun com
pany, and sent it home to his parents.
The cross is valued very highly
by the Good family, as it is one of
the few that have been taken from
the enemy.
It is now on display in the window
of the Rowles-Mack company.
ENTERTAINED AT DINNER
her
In
will
and

but
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Madsen delight
fully entertained at a Thanksgiving
dinner at their home on Bridge
street. The guests were Miss 'Blanche
Dunn, Frank Moser and Miss Lutora
Gunderson.
The following guests also enjoyed
dancing and music in the evening:
The Misses Doris Dunn, Blanche
Dunn, Lutora Gunderson, and Dorsey
Stevens, Merril Boyle, Frank Moser
and Mr. and Mrs. E ,R. Madsen.
at
ter
nice
ENTERTAINED AT DINNER
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Thorsen enter
tained at a 6 o'clock Thanksgiving
dinner at their home on 327 Univer
sity street for Mr. and Mrs. Will
iam Varley, Mrs. Grace Stevens and
son Sprague and Mr. Fehnel.

SPENT THANKSGIVING HERE
George Holbrook of Rock SpringB,
Wyo., arrived in Blackfoot the first
of the week and spent Thanksgiving
here visiting with his family.
Mr. Holbrook returned home the
last of the week.
-4
ACCEPTED A POSITION
Miss Polly Perry of Lima, Mont,
arrived In Blackfoot the last of the
week an A has accepted a position as
third trick operator at the O. S. L.
depot. She Is taking the place made
vacant by Shaw Veaver. Mr. Weaver
has accepted a position as operator
at Shelley. %
Mrs.
at
at
ton

ILL WITH INFLUENZA
Aloys Spaunbeaur is very ill with
the Influenza at his home northeast
of Blackfoot. At last reports he was
on the improve.
The other members of the family
who have the same disease, are do
ing nicely. _
den
stock
Coy
War Summary
de
lar
pro
the
the
un
a
pos
.
of
call
de
and
the
November 29
Seven steamers will leave London
within the next ten days which in
cludes practically all American troops
in England.
Mooney gets left inmprosonment.
President leaves for Europe this
week.
<P
November SO
Twenty thousand dollora reward
to one who will kill the kaiser
bring him back to Germany, where
he will be sentenced by his own peo
or
pie.
Huns must pay for war to limit of
their capacity.
President names four delegates
for peace conference: Robert Lans
ing, Secretary of state, Colonel F.
M. House, Henry White, former am
bassador to France and Italy, and
General Tasker H. Bliss, former chief
staff of army and now our military
representative at the war council at
Versailles.
William deslrees to reclaim throno
and contemplates returning to Gem
many.
December 2
The first large body of American
soldiers arrive at New York. Two
thirds of total number of United
States forces from England are now
enroute home.
Germany faces many labor
troubles.
in
ar

COMMITTEE WILL
DRAFT MEASURES
TWIN FALLS, Ida.—A committee
to draft proposed measures of legis
lation enactment sought by the farm
bureau at the next session of the
Idaho legislature has been named by
the executive and advisory commit
tees of the Twin Falls county organ
ization, to consist of the following;
W. F. Alworth, Twin Falls, president
of the state and county farm'bureau
organizations; Frank DeKoltz, Filer,
member of the county executive com
mittee, and County Agent Donald
IfcLean.
t The recommendations of this com
mittee will be submitted to the mem
bership of the county farm bureau
ai Its general meeting in December,
tad^lf approved at that time, will be
jifejifented for the action of the legls
* Among the measures likely to be
recommended by this committee are
pioposed legislation for regulating
tfje relations between farm laborers
wjtd employees, improvement of mar- j
kiting conditions and further pro -1
v«ions for combating rodent pests in
aad other crop pests.
Leonard Moore of Spanish Fork,'
Utab has made the supreme sacrifice
for his country. ~ ,
Mr. Moore came *to Blackfoot and
oub
we
has
all
that
not
We
the
U.

LEONARD MOORE
MAKES SUPREME SACRIFICE
wa$ a resident of the surrounding
country for some time before he
jolfled the army. He was sent in
June with one of the draft contin
egnts, trained In the U. S. army only
a short time and was sent overseas.
He ip survived by a widowed
mother and several sisters and
brothers.
TO VISIT AUSTRALIA
Mr. and Mrs. P. G. Johnston and
son Lloyd and Miss Lucy Wicks leave
the first of the week for Australia,
where they will visit with friends and
relatives.
Mrs. Johnston's and Miss Wick's
parents live there. They will also
visit with their son Rich Johnston,
who has been there on business for
the past two years.
They expect to be gone about five
months.
HARMON BOY IN FRANCE
Mrs. W. H. Harmon of this city
received a card informing her that
her son John A. had arrived safely
In France. He arrived too late to
take part in the active fighting, but
will doubtless gain much experience
and be benefited by the experiences.
• He enlisted In Denver when he was
but fifteen years of age and Is just a
little past sixteen at the present
time.
GUESTS AT DINNER
Dr. and Mrs. Hoover entertained
at a Thanksgiving dinner at their
home on 490 North Stout avenue.
The following were the guests:
Judge and Mrs. Cowen and daugh
ter Rosemary, and the Misses Ber
nice Wood, Hay and Baron.

THANKSGIVING AFFAIR
Mrs. T. C. Thompson was the
charming hostess at a Thanksgiving
.dinner in her beautiful new home at
North Woodville.
Covers were laid for ten guests.
Those present were Mrs. Ruth Mc
Hale, Miss Ann McHale, Mrs. Carl
Peterson and daughter Virginia.
The afternoon was spent very
pleasantly.
and
by
use
the
ated.

ENTERTAINED AT DINNER
a
of
uary
sugar
tinue
will
Mrs. M. E. Boyd and daughter
Mrs. Bert Pennington, entertained
at an elaborate Thanksgiving dinner
at their home on South Shilling ave.
Covers were laid for Mr. and Mrs.
Robert E. Boyd* Mrs. A. L. Penning
ton and daughter Laura.
SOLD THREE CARLOADS OF HOGS
U.
James Martin and A. E. McCoy
shipped a car load of fat hogs to Og
den Thursday, and two car loads of
stock hogs to Wesner, Neb. Mr. Mc
Coy accompanied the latter ship
ment.
4444444444444444444

4
+ DEMOCRACY VS. AUTOCRACY. 4
in
troops
this
4
+
4*
4 . to
+
on
of
of
. , .
ihe sugar Bupply, however' must be in
safeguard and conservation prac
Sugar'bowles must the
still be kept from the tables it hotels
and restaurants and lunoh counters.
This conservation practice will be tries
continued permanently in eating 8
<P . . fuel
Retailers will no longer be re- t
tijii
tion
for
or
trol
age
of
last
This
gross
cause
and
ing

are
to
the
sent
War
field.
"There Is no royal road to 4 *
4 * food conservation. We can only 4 *
4* accomplish this by the voluntary 4 *
4* action of our whole people, each 4
4* element In proportion to Its 4
4 needs. It Is a mutter of equality 4
4 of burden."
The truth of this statement, 4
4 made by the United States Food 4
4 Administrator soon after we en- 4
4 tered the war, has been borne 4
4 out by the history of our ex- 4
4 porta Autocratic food control 4
4 In the lands of our enemies has 4
4 broken down, while democratic 4
4 food sharing has maintained the 4
4 health and strength of thisooun- 4
4 try and of the Allies.
4
where
peo
4
or
of
Lans
F.
am
and
chief
at
Gem
4
44 v4 4444 4 V 44 4i 4.*444
HALF CENT A MILE
CHANGE IN SUGAR CON
SERVATION RULES EXPLAINED
Two
now
labor
Notice has already been given thru
the newspapers that beginning De
cember 1 , the sugar allowance will
be Increased to the ^nearly normal
ration of four pounds per capita per
month. This is more sugar than
most people will use at this time of
year, and purchases made during
each month should be based on actual
requirements. Any sugar saved out
of the permitted ration makes it pos
sible to improve .the pitiful rations
allowed to Europe.
The United States even now has
the largest sugar allowance of any
people in the world. Italy has the
low ration of three-fourths of a
pound per person; France one and
one-tenth pounds; England two
pounds, Canada two pounds .Turkey
less than any other country and it
coBts as high as $5.00 per pound.
For the present at least, no one
in this country nded worry about
sugar. Public eating places will re
ceive allowances on the basis of four
pounds for each ninety meals served,
farm
the
by
be
be
are
j quired to obtain sugar certificates
-1 froqi the county food administrator,
in order to purchase sugar from the
wholesaler. Retailers must Btlll
keep a record of their sales to con
jsumers.
The armistice has been signed, t&e
submarines are gone, the substitutes
are gone, restrictions have been les
sened. We have saved wonderfully
during the war period, and we are
glad that we did save, but what has
been accomplished is nothing com
pared with the huge saving that
must be undertaken and voluntarily
accomplished between now and next
harvest. The past year by a mament
oub effort, we exported 11,000,000
tons of foodstuffs, the coming year
we must export a minimum of 20 ,
000,000 tons.
Here are some of the awful sit
uations that confront us in Europe
today:
Four million of Holland's popula
tion are lining up dally in the bread
lines.
One half of Sirerla's population
have perished; the other half is
starving.
In Belgium the civil population
has in a way, been maintained. With
all our efforts toward finding the
Belgians we have only been able to
keep them alive.
Even in Switzerland the people are
threatened with starvation. 1
The Czero-Slovakz and little
Greece are in the throes of famine.
Poland has lost one-fourth of its
population, the remaining people
must be fed.
It Is apparent that there is an al
truistic idea ivolved. The thought
that your \ neighbor should starve,
while you are living in abundance is
not the thought of a red-blooded
American.
So it is up to every good loyal
America to save. There are no re
strictions, you must save voluntarily.
We have promised to feed the lntnny
millions in Europe—the allies and
the liberated nations. We can only
fullfll our promise by saving to the
utmost. '
"Food will save the world.''
GEORGE F. GAGON,
U. S. Food Administrator for Bing
ham £ounty.
he
in
to
a
Boise
sage
for
office
of
him
the
er
per
will
effect
June
much
This
much
thi$
the
able
days.
SUGAR DISTRIBUTION
PLAN DISCONTINUED
Dealers In sugar, manufacturers
and consumers are notified that our
previous instructions regarding the
distribution of sugar are cancelled
by wire from the U. 8 . food admin
istration dated November 27, 1918.
Effective December 1, unrestricted
use of sugar will be permitted and
the distribution of Sugar on the cer
tificate plan is on said date elimin
ated.
Manufacturers will, however, be
required to limit their purchase to
a thirty days supply until the arrival
of the Cuban raw sugar about Jan
uary 16.
While restrictions on the use of
sugar in public eating places will con
tinue In effect, four pounds of sugar
will be allowed to each person each
month in the homes beginning next
Monday.
GEORGE F. GAGON,
U. S. Food Administrator tor Bing
ham County.
Dated November 30, 1918.
; -♦
Bolshevism le merely czarlsm In
overalls.—Dexter (Mo.) Statesman.
ANTHRACITE DISTRIBUTION
REARRANGED TO MEET
PRODUCTION LOSSES
4
4
+
Readjustment of the Nation's an
thracite coal supply necessitated by a
falling off in production, due largely
to influenza amon gminers, has been
effected by the United States Fuel
Administration. The announcement
followed a three-day meeting of Fuel
4* Administration executives, various
State administrators, and the Ad
ministration's Antnraclte Committee,
at which preparations undertaken
when production was ravaged by
epidemic were gone over and com
pleted.
All districts to which anthracite
has been allotted have been canvas
sed and protective measures have
been taken for localities where the
shipments now on hand are not up
4 . to allotted quotas. To each place
+ coal will starf from assigned mines,
on specified orders, for exact quan
tities to be delivered in specified
times. The Administration's policy
of protecting first the points farthest
away, and holding up shipments 4o
communities already supplied in fa
vor of those which are below the
assigned quota will be followed In
the distribution. Among the larger
adjustments are the following:
November 25 was the day set for
the completion of loading coal for
shipment to the Northwest by way
of the lirea tLakes. This was in
tended to insure its arrival on or be
fore November 30, at Lake Erie
ports, where vessels sufficient for Its
movement were to be readiness. Rail
shipments Into this territory will be
continued after the close of lake
navigation.
Shipments will be made of 40,000
tons of anthracite to Indiana before
November 30.
A delivery will be made of 100
carloads (approximately 5,000 net
tons) daily through New England
gateways for distribution as the
State administrators may direct.
In addition, It was stated, full ar
rangements are In hand for the pro
tection of smaller areas, where pro
duction has not reached the -allotted
quotas. These also will be cared for
be in their turn .those farthest from the
mines or those which have obtained
the smallest proportion of their al
lotmiit receiving first attention,
Anthracite allotment to war lndus
tries will be diverted wherever pos
8 ibie, to domestic purposes, and other
fuel will be substituted. In connec
t lon with the conditions of supply
tijii distribution of anthracite it was
announced that the Fuel Administra
tion will stand ready throughout the
winter to provide bituminous cohl
for domestic users in any locality in
which lack of sufficient production
or other circumstances beyond con
trol may possibly produce a short
age of anthracite warranting the use
of soft coal. Available stocks of bi
tuminous* coal are far greater than
last winter, and the control of its
distribution is far more effective.
This situation, Fuel Administration
officials said, constitutes a factor of
safety in the domestic situation,
which was lacking last winter.
Production of anthracite coal de
creased approximately 1,500,000
gross tons (1,680,000 net tons) be
cause of the epidemic of influenza
and the two ceieoratlons of the sign
ing of the armistice.
• Thousands jf anthracite miners
are to be released from the army
to aid in speeding up pr Junction in
the anthracite fields. Telegraphic
instructions to this end have been
sent to all camps by Secretary of
War Baker, acting upon the urgent
request of Fuel Administrator Gar
field.
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De
per
of
out
a
it
FOR SLEEPER SERVICE
DROPPED DECEMBER 1
.Travelers to be Relieved of Special
War Tax That Caused Much
Inconvenience.
•Good new for travelers reached
Boise Thanksgiving day in a mes
sage to W. H. Miniely, ticket agent
for the Oregon Short Line, from the
office of the general passenger agent
of the system at Salt Lake telling
him that on and after December 1
the half cent a mile charge for sleep
er service, plus an additional eight
per cent on the cost of the berth,
will be discontinued. It has been In
effect as a government ruling since
June JO and has been the cause of
much inconvenience and criticism.
This tax amounted practically to as
much as the original dost of the
sleeper berth.
DR. MACKIE IMPROVING
Dr. Mackie is much improved at
thi$ writing. He has been ill for
the past few days, but expects to be
able to resume his duties In a few
days.
YOUR EYES
Might be perfect as far as good
sight Is concerned, and yet be
the cause of far reaching ner
vous troubles In your system.
If you suffer with headaches,
st-macb sensitiveness, dizziness
of fainting spells or nervous
ness it would be advisable to
have them examined by a
specialist for best results. r
See ..Dr. ..Scarbrough ..at ..the
Eccles Hotel.
- Tuesday,
December 3

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