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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, December 03, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1918-12-03/ed-1/seq-5/

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CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES:
this head will be charged for at the
rate of 10 cents per line each lasua.
The Republican will not be re
sponsible for more than one Inser
tion for errors In classified adver
tisements.
Advertisements under
FOR BALE—Mlscellaneoi
FIFTEEN LITTLE PIGS WEIGHING
about 30 pounds each, $6 each.
R. Hotovey, Route 2, Box 85, two
miles north of Rockford. 20a-2p
BEANS 12% CENTS PER POUND
delivered in Blackfoot.
282R1, Ralph Johnson, R. 2. 19a-tf
Pnone
HAVE 350 SHEEP TO SELL IN
lots to suit buyer, bred to lamb
in March, approved notes accepted.
Blackfoot Realty company.
N. J. Thorstenberg.
See
adv. 19tf.
■t
HEATING STOVES, ONE LARGE,
one medium sized heater for sale
at the Republican office.
tf.
LOST
FI*4E GOLD WRIST WATCH, OCTO
gon shape, black band, finely en
graved. Notify Mrs. Charles Kirk,
phone 418R4. $10 reward. 20a-tf
WHITE FUR SCARF. LEAVE AT
20a-l
this office. Reward.
THREE YEAR OLD ROAN SAD
dle horse with bald face, white
hind legs, dark brown spot on
back.
Strayed from Patterson
ranch at Presto.
Morris, Shelley, Idaho, Route 2,
Box 53, or McDonald's Real Estate
office, Blackfoot, and receive re
ward.
Notify E. P.
. ■
|
+
1 LOCAL NEWS
Books on tne war at the public
library in the city hall at Blackfoot. I
Life insurance. Beebe.
adv 16 5 tf
John Wondenburg left Saturday
for Auld, Colo., where he will visit
for a few days wjth his brother.
tf.
Mayor Stephens, Edwin Tayior,
and James Young returned Friday
from the Falls river country, where
they spent ten days hunting big
game.
J .J. Fearheiler, auctioneer. Sat
isfaction guaranteed,
or 252. .
C. A. Feamster and W. W. Feams
ter went to Ashton Saturday to at
tend to some business matters.
Bring in your spuds. We are pre
pared to handle them any time at
the highest market price.
Stone, phone 23, Clark Fuel & Ice
18tf.
J. W. Lungford and familv will
leave in the very near future for
Anaconda, Mont., Mr. Lungford hav
ing received employment there The
family will remain there during the
winter months.
A. J. Stevens of Shellov, O S.
Evans from Somerset, Kentuckv, who
is visiting at the Stevens home, were
bnsn ess visitors in.Biackfoic Satur
dav
Phone 33W
adv. 18 tf.
D. A.
Co.
the
has
Dr. W. W. Beck made a profesi
siona business trip to Thomas Sat
urday morning.
Feed Hansen of Shelley spent Sun
day in Blackfoot visiting with
friends.
* Mrs'. R. J. Ward spent Thanksgiv
ing in Dillon visiting with her par
ents.
flu.
low
sore
of
in
Roy
Va.,
has
eral
Miss Grace Bingham of Groveland
spent Friday evening in Blackfoot
the guest of Miss Doris Dunn.
Miss Mary Oles of Idaho Falls
passed thru Blackfoot the first of the
week enroute to Pocatello.
Mrs. Edwards was taken to Poca
tello Sunday, where she will receive
medical treatment the hospital.
She was accompanied by her husband
and Mrs. Charles Mackie.
E. R. Madsen ahd Mr. Athey were
hunting In the Springfield vicinity
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Nell F. Boyle, Mrs.
^rcher and Ellis Graham were busi
ness visitors In Shelley Friday. ,
Neil F. Boyle made a business trip
to Firth the last of the week.
Ray Stephens, Norman Tolmie and
Francis Blomqulst spent Sunday
hunting ducks out near the reserva
tion.
»
L. E. Dillingham was in Blackfoot
Sunday night on his way home from
Pocatello to Mackay.
S. Li. Martin, with the Continental
Oil company went tp Mackay Mon
day in the inte est of the oil com
pany. >
Mrs.' Marrion returned to her
home here Monday, after a htree
months visit with relatives in Idaho
Falls.
The Misses Martha High and Jose
phine Saunders were Pocatello vis
' itors Monday.
Mrs Nellie Stone returned to her
home in Pocatello Monday, after a
few days visit at the John R. Jones
home.
William Parks of Moreland left
Saturday afternoon "for Gentile val
ley on account of the serious illness
o fhis daughter and son-in-law Mr.
and Mrs. A. F. Hatch, who haye in
fluenza.
family
ill
her
night
will
first
at
ing
cepted
City
left
for
with
Harry Trego has bought twenty
of land In McDonaldville
acrees
from Herbert Gray for $2900. The
land has no buildings pn, but It is
fenced with woven" wire.
HILL
Monday,
by
pany
Cyril Wright has purchased part
of the Will Younie farm west of
Blackfoot and is excavating a base
ment preparatory to building a
house.
new
Mrs. Viola Madsen returned to her
home in Sait Lake, after two months
at their farm near there.
Thomas Riley spent the week .in
Pocatello visiting with friends.
Mr. Starweather left Saturday for
Salt Lake, where he will look after
business Interests.
Miss Alice Chubbuck spent Satur
day in Pocatello visiting with friends.
E. R. Madsen made a business trip
to Pocatello Saturday, returning on
the afternoon train.
Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Drollinger re
turned Saturday from Ashton, where
they went to attend the funeral of
their nephew.
Frank DeKay, warden of the state
penitentiary, was a Blackfoot busi
ness visitor Saturday morning.
The Misses Nevada Browning, Dor
ris Moi^gomery, and Messrs. Sam
Kirk and Jess Thompson, enjoyed
skating on the Snako river Thurs
day evening.
Dr. F. O. Keys is spending a few
days here with his family.
t J. V. England and two sons, John
and Hyrum. returned to their home
in Moreland last weeK, after spend
ing the .summer on their farm near
.-.mo, Idaho.
Messers. Crabtree and Davis re
turned Thursday from a two weeks'
hunting trip in the Lost river coun
Ed Rockwood made a business trip
to St. Anthony and Ashton Friday,
where he will spend a few davs in I
the interests of the Boise-Payette
Lumber company.
try.
C. P. Fridman made a business trip
to St. Anthony and Ashton, where
he will spend a few days attending
to business matters.
Mr. .and Mrs. J. F. Lewis bf 'St.
Anthony spent Thanksgiving at the
D. W. Vincent home, returning Fri
day.
Mrs. Guy Priest spent Thanks
giving at the home of her sister in
Rigby.
Miss Hazel Vickery of Pingree
spent Thanksgiving day with the Al
bert Miller family, returning home
Friday.
Mrs. J. H. Berg of Firth was a
business visitor here Friday.
Mrs. H. J. Simmons spent Thanks
giving in Pocatello visiting with her
parents.
Mrs. Hurst of Mackay spent a few
days of last week in Blackfoot visit
ing with friends.
ing with friends.
S. Langdon of Pocatello was a
business visitor in Blackfoot the last
of the week.
W. G. Price of Yakima, Wash,
was a business visitor In Blackfoot
the last of the week.
R. R. Davis of Aberdeen spent
several days of last week in Black
foot.
in
in
Friday
where
big
Sat
Feams
at
pre
at
Ice
18tf.
will
for
hav
The
the
S.
who
were
Satur
33W
tf.
Miss Susie Gould spent Thanks
giving in Shelley visiting with rela
tives.
A.
J. II. Nielson of Goshen has a new
house in course of construction,
W. E. Murphy and family of Luray, I
Kan. arrived in Blackfoot Friday
morning to visit a brother, J. H.
Murphy,' who lives just below town.
They planned to spend -Thanksgiv
ing here, but on account of delay of
the trains they arrived the morning
after.
Miss Gertrude Kinney returned to
Blackfoot Tuesday night* after a
seven weeks' absence. Miss Kinney
has been in Pocatello, and has re
covered from a severe attack of the
Sat
Sun
with
par
flu.
Miss Amelia Kirkpatrick and her
nephew Harold Kirkpatrick, who
have been in Kansas City for some
months, where he has been .taking
treatment, are expected to arrive
home about the eighteenth of this
month.
J. F. Kirkpatrick, who lives be
low town has been suffering with a
sore throat for a couple of weeks.
G. W. Arbogast, wffo lives two
miles below Blackfoot, between the
rivers, is a new-comer in the com
munity, having been here only a few
months. He received a nice fat
'turkey for Thanksgiving from some
friends in Nebraska.
R. F. Ferguson, who lives on one
of the Stewart farms below town re
ceived a visit last week from his
brother Roy Ferguson, who has been
in the navy for a couple of years.
Roy came t hru from Newport News,
Va., for th,e visit.
G. F. Miller, who lives between the
rivers, about five miles below town,
has been quite seriously ill for sev
eral weeks and members of the
family despair of his recovery. His
daughter, Mrs. Green is here from
Denver taking care of him.
Falls
the
trip
at
and
tana
the
for
sist
I
ing
the
come
to
been
party,
his
York
a
LEFT for CALIFORNIA.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Just and
family left Saturday morning for
California, where they will spend the
remainder of the winter.
Miss Marian Just, who has been
ill for some time was taken there for
her health.
ENJOYING A MONTH'S VACATION
Miss Mary Henaby left Saturday
night for Eugene, Ore., where she
will vlBit with relatives until the
first of the year.
Miss Henaby visited with friends
at Idaho Falls Saturday night leav
ing there for her home Sunday.
I
will
ACCEPTED A POSITION
a
people
Taft
other
ful
ton
Miss Genevieve Milllck has
cepted a position at the Blackfoot
City Bank.
ac
She filled the vacancy
left by Miss Wicks, who left Sunday
for Australia, where she will visit
with relatives.
HILL HE
E MPLOYE D AT KIltTH
Wilford Chapman went to Firth
Monday, where he will be employed
by the Boyle-Slayton Hardware com
pany at that place.
that
Brooklyn
I Mrs. Weslc^ Lantis
Is Called to Rest
She is sur
.. . „ _ „ _
Recently Mrs. Lantis assisted at
the Seeger-Bundlie company store
and before her marriage capably
filled the position of saleslady In the :
Kinney Mercantile store, at which
places she made warm friends with
everyone she met. Her winsome j
ways and loving disposition endeared !
her to the hearts of all who knew her 1
and her sunny smile often made
sad heart glad.
Mra. Wesley Lantis, age twenty
eight, passed away at the home of
her parents, north of Blackfoot, Fri
day morning, after suffering for one
week with influenza,
vived by a husband, a baby boy, her
Pearl Emma Rider, wife of Bishop
Oscar L. Rider, died at the family
residence November 27 1918 at fivp
a. m. of influenza ' !
Mrs. Rider was horn at St John !
Ariz. March 10, 1881, is the daughter !
of John and Jane C. Davis, who were
pioneers of that section.
She lived at St. Johns until 1903
June, 1904 she was' married :
to Oscar L Rider and thev
moved to Blackfoot, Ida. in the sum
mer of 1912, here they have lived
since that time. '
Her funeral was held_at the Grove
City cemetery November 29, E. T.
Malcom Bishop Rider's speonfl pmin !
solor taking charge, a few very im-!r'
preessive remarks were made bv t -
I Peter G. Johnston, and the grave
was dedicated by President James
Duckworth. Mrs. Rider was a very
devout woman to her family and an
active church worker having strved
in the Y. L. W. I. A. as counsolor and
'secretary, also taking an active part
in the primary and a teacher in the
Sunday school, and was at present
connected with the Bldckfoot second
ward relief society
She leaves to mourn her loss be
sides her husband, five children, one
boy and four girls, also her mother, 11
two sisters, and two brothers as well
fhVsecttoi. " any rel£tiVeS ' thrU ° Ut
pa
cal
Funeral services were held from '
the Brown-Eldredge undertaking
parlors Sunday afternoon and the
loved one was laid to rest in the
Grove City cemetery.
a
OBITUARY
THOMPSON'S CELEBRATE
GOLDEN WEDDING
Mr. and MrsT Will Thompson of
a
last
Wash,
spent
Black
GOLDEN WEDDING
Mr. and MrsT Will Thompson of
Blackfoot celebrated their golden
wedding on Sunday, the first day of
December. Most of the members of
their family were at home to join
in the festivities.
The Thompson family have lived
in Blackfoot for a third of a
tury, having come here from Car
rinne_ Utah. They lived here for a
number of years during the early
days and have watched the wonder
ful transformation in Jhe Snake river
valley since the days of its early set
tlement.
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are both
cen
Thanks
rela
new
Luray, I _ he « Itlly an ? active and are
Friday dgures ob t ie streets of
H. wlacKt00t -
town.
of
to
a
Kinney
re
the

VICTIM OF FLU
I
Mrs. D. W. Miller, at the age of
twenty-five years died at 4 o'clock
Sunday afternoon, Nov. 24, from in
fluenza-pneumonia, after a several
days' illness. She is survived by a
husband and two children, Alta age or
faUier! U tlJee S bro a thers 6 'and twd^sis*
ters. '
Interment was made In the city ^
cemetery.
Mrs. Miller was* born at Burville
Seveir county, Utah, and came here
with her parents Mr. and Mrs. B. M.
Hancock twenty-three years ago.
and
line
her
who
some
arrive
this
be
a
two
the
com
few
fat
some
one
re
his
been
the
sev
the
His
from
ENTERTAINED AT DINNER.
Mr. and Mrs. George Holbrook en
tertained at a - Thanksgiving dinner
at their 'home in University Avenue.
Dinner was served to the following
guests: Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Good and
daughter, Irene, Grandma Holbrook
and Barbara Holbrook.
Mr. Holbrook came here from
Wyo., fo spend
well
for
to
Rock Springs,
Thanksgiving with his family.
'LEFT FOR BILLINGS, MONT.
EUis Graham left Saturday night
IJlings, Mont., where he will as
in invoicing the Aidridge
Buchanan Hardware stores in Mon
tana and Wyoming.
Mr. Graham was formerly with
the Aberdeen Hardware company.
for Bi
sist
den
of
A
ed
edly.

BUCKS FOR SALE
I have sixty-five Hampshire yearl-
ing bucks for sale. H. C. C. Rich,
Pingree, Idaho.
-♦
It is no longer a question of licking
the Hun, but of keeping him licked.
—Washington Herald.
- ♦ -
We dare Black Jack Pershing to
come home and take what is coming
to him like a man.—New York Sun.
-♦
Gen. John J. Pershing, who has
been touring France with a large
party, expects to visit the home of
his ancestors in Alsace soon.—New
York Sun.
adv. 15-tf.
tell
It
your
the
cow,
bor
say
other
how
now
sin
eyes
out
and
for
the
for
«
she
the

Now for the slacker chorus: "How
I wish I'd had a chance at those
Huns!"—Newark News.
—,—«—:—
Safe to say that President Wilson
will never wake another sleeping ele
phant.—Boston Herald.
A
in
boon
bodies
sign.
abled
other,
top;
back
canvas
sides,
against
against
the

America, too, it seems, is to have
a coalition administration. But the
people had to arrange it themselves.
—Cincinnati Commercial Tribune.
Prussia may regard the fact that
Taft and Roosevelt are calling each
other by their first names as a hope
ful evidence of forgiveness in the
American temperament.—Washing
ton Star.

Germany's greatest work of art is
that final "bust" of the Kaiser.—
Brooklyn Eagle.
MEANT FREEDOM FOR FRANCE
Allegorical Representation of Young
Girl's Impressions of First 8oL
dlers F^om America.
Kathleen Norris gives an imaginary
conversation with a young French girl
describing the coming of the American
,0 " ,1OT " P """ ■* - '■ »"»"*<■
—from America! I remember stand
: tog to the chateau gateway on a bright
November afternoon and seeing them
come up the road. Soldiers ! We were I
j used to soldiers' But these were dif
! , 01 ". t ,, ' ut tbese " ere dlf -
1 feient - Grandmere was with me, we
j
|
,,«... , _ .
They are the Americans 1" Grand
m^re said, and she began to cry softly,
''God bless them—God bless them!" slip
whispered, over and over.
"And that night, as you know, we
had their officers at the chateau and
one of them told me he, also, had a
. . '
! ^ !v" 0t mUCh younger than *
! „ her name was Vir ginia—
! 1 dont know wb y—for, God knows,
tl *ere were hard times, and dark times. I
ahead—but from that moment I felt I
hope. Child that I was, I seemed to
: aud gen ^ rous nation that was dedicat
ng ItSe f to their servlce ' tho women
everywhere, with their sewing and
cooking, saving and planning, their let
ters and their prayers—all one in their
work for an %al beside which the :
comfort and the ease of this n-onprsHnn .
! o i anatne ease or this geneiation
aS aS . not ling! Woman's Home
t - /0ni P a nion.
— -
REfiARn mi n -AC QPQinilO
nl-UHnu LULU Ho oEnlUUo
Medieal Authority Warns Against Con
temptuous Attitude Too Often
Taken by Those Afflicted. ^
_
to remember It:
" 'And men—to stand beside our men
had been here all the time.
"'They came^along, in the stream
' tog afternoon sunlight, and they smiled
and waved at me.
grave — -
James REfiARn mi n -AC QPQinilO
very nl-UHnu LULU Ho oEnlUUo
an
strved Medieal Authority Warns Against Con
and temptuous Attitude Too Often
part Taken by Those Afflicted. ^
the _
present The ultrawise citizen of ™io nor
second , UI J rawlse CItl f en of male per
suasion devotes part of the sweltry
be- suimner du y s to the unsympathetic a
one task of selecting his winter overcoat—
mother, 11 wise and sometimes money-saving*
well Piece of foresight. Other perspiring ?
° Ut Zt fnr b 7l ne If! In " rP , re '
pa e for winter. It Is probably in tills
spirit that the very midsummer nuin
ber of Boston Medical and Surgical
cal Journal touches upon the Decern
bery subject of colds, and it is pre- or
cisel.v in this spirit that we translate
'JSL'STd cT the ttT dI th al be
rlting of Dr. D. C. Dennett In the
Journal. of
Treat colds early and carefully.
Golds are simply the first stages of
pneumonia, tuberculosis and many >
When you have a '
cold you are in the beginning „ !
„ ,, e , De „innlng of a , er
. disease, which may develop If ;
you neglect it. In military camps the j not
order Is that colds be reported upon j
the appearance of first symptoms. ;
Do not poke a cold with medicated !
r
of
golden
of
of
join
lived
Car
a
early
river
set
both
cen
other aliments.
.
are
of
cotton on a stick. Do not take aspirl
except for pain. Do not spray a cold, j
Do not take quinine and whisky,' but
treat a cold seriously because it is
serious disease. Consult a doctor. *
!
a I
|
\of
n
of
in- Italians All in It.
"Practically every woman in Italy
a from sixteen to sixty is
age or n volunteer war worker, and the I
fT.rob° of their ^ctivit ^ bpnoflce " t j but
' r ® °£^ th eir activity, Count V. I
city ^ Incbbi Cellere said in an address ; of
before the Continental Congress of the ! 18
rtongfcters 0 f the American Revolu- I
here tlon. _ j
M. Our women in Italy, though not
politically organized or prepared for
service, had within their hearts and
minds the hereditary tradition of the
struggle for liberty^ and nationality
and have stepped forward, falling into
line with marvelous efficiency and
unanimity, backing the men in the
army from royal palace to munition
plant.
, tor
l ing
n war nurse
so
cost
aries
had
chase
price.
just
dent
war
to
mate
this
given,
that,
has
crowds
crowds
tracks
Instead
their
misery
en
and
"They have undertaken the task of
rooking after the soldiers' families,
well as reconstructing and refitting
for useful lives the disabled men, of
giving handS to the fields as well
to the factory."
as
as
as
What He Wanted.
General Biddle said at a London gar
den party:
"The doughboy In France has a lot
of trouble with the French language.
A doughboy sat on a bench in the
Tuileries gardens one day arid thumb
ed a French phrase book discontent
edly.
to
of
'This here book,' he^growled, 'don't
tell you what you want to 'say at all.
It tells you bow to say the uncle of
your mother is slxty-flve years old, or
the sister of your wife has bought a
cow, or the umbrella of your neigh
bor Is In the attic, but I don't want to
say nothing of that kind.'
"'What do you want to say?' an
other ~ doughboy asked.
What Pm after,' said the first
doughboy, Ms a book that tells you
how to sav Tnnr tnne io derson
now to say, 'Your face Is familiar;
sin .t we met befor*? or Gee, them
eyes ! # or Little girl, you sure do look derson,
out o'sight in that swlmmin'suit'" France
fies
These
to
seas.
TWO
« 4
New Motorcycle Ambulance.
A motorcycle ambulance, illustrated
in Popular Mechanics Magazine, has
boon built for use abroad, and
bodies many new refinements of de
sign. The sidecar will carry two dis
abled men on stretchers, one above the
other, and is equipped with a rounded
top; hinged to one side of the steel h® 611
framework so that It can be turned Pharm
back for loading and unloading. A le f t
canvas covering, which attaches to the
sides, bowed top and ends like a side
against afford * co,n P lete Protection tlon
against the weather for the men on and
the stretchers. expects
ceives
ern
INFECTION FROM
SHAVING-BRUSHES
girl
I
dif
dlf -
we
New shaving-brushes should be
thoroly and carefull y washed in hot,
soapy water before use. The bristles
of such brushes may come from in
fected animals .and anthrax
_ spores
have been known to be transmitted
'thus to the human users. The pop
ular myth' that infection of this kind
is of German origin is not only im
probable, but unnecesary, but the
war is doubtless one of the remote
causes, as It is responsible for a lack
of care In importing animal products
and in treating them thoroly with
j antiseptics. The remedy lies In
| separate disinfection by the user,
and this would apply not only to
shaving-brushes, but to all other im
plements made of bristles or hair.
Leather Is presumably cleaned by
the various processes to which it is
subjected in tanning. Says a writer
. to American Medicine (New York):
"Anthrax in its industrial forms
primarily results from the handling
slip of hides, hair, and carcasses of In
fected animals. According to Public
we H . ea . lth Reports, the surgeon-general
„ the arnly ha , s sported the occur
a cases of anthrax due
to infected shaving-brushes,
*- experience of England indicates that
a number of victims of malignant
pustule have orginated thru the use
I of ne ^ shaving brushes, the bristles
I °, f wb . , have been found to contain
to nf h , antI ! raX spore ?"
fnT.« Li h ««oa e „t '■*££%&
hair which had presumably been dis
infected in accordance with all re
quirements.
"Anthrax, generally a disease of
amma ls such as horses, cattle, and
: ff a degre ®
. v toutonce for human beings, but
nevertheless t he occurrence of anv
disease of this character is sufficient
warrant for drawing attention to the
importance of the effective sterliza
tlon . of , h ! des and hair previous to
manipulation and use by human be
togs. Hog bristles apparently are
comparatively free from anthrax,
ev . en whea emanating from countries
^ bare inf ® c * ed horsehair is common.
T, great demand for brush ma
te na land the difficulties in securing
an adequate quantity from the usual
trade channels possibly have led to
a letting down of the preventive
measures in old establishments and
the exhibition of carelessness on the
? art „r "f, w "ap^facturers less
arising "from * irtHmrfecUy^^isiiHected
horse-hair. The anthrax spores are
highly resistant to sunlight and dry
ness and require boiling for at least
two hours in order to destroy them,
or an hour in th e autoclave at 220
deg L e ,®, . ...
be th'so^cTSf^e^S SX
come from China and Sibera and is
of a gray or yellowish color, and the
Imitation badger hair.
'' As a partioal measure of protec
> tIon , thru and repeated washings in
' hot ' 80apy water appear to secure
! the mechanical removal of the dang
, er ou8 infective material, and in con
; sequence new shaving brushes should
j not he used without this preliminary
j operation of cleansing. Even with
; this precaution the danger of infec
! tion to not entirely removed,
r anthrax bacilli, or spores
men
bid
ber
the
all
ing
it
The
ness
and
2
colt,
.
2 .
as
I
j
may be
found on the ends of the hair im
! bedded in the handle. The only cer
tain measure of protection for the
I shaver is the elimination of the in
| fection previous to the manufacturer
\of shaviifg brushes.
"The serious and high mortality-f,.
rate of anthrax are sufficient reasons I ,
shown
I
j but . also those wbo unwittingly
I make use of shaving brushes as part
; of their routine of cleanliness. There
! 18 virtually no sound excuse for the
I transference of malignant pustule to
j civilians^or soldiers thru shaving
brushes -"
, tor protecting not merely those, ,
'whose occupations require the bandl ™ ho
l ing of potentially infective material,
It
- » -
'AUSTRIA
'AUSTRIA NAKED, WITHOUT FOOD
BERNE, Switzerland.—Food was j
so expensive in Vienna that a meager j
unpalatable and unsatisfactory meali
cost from $4 up. Clothes were so!
scarce a mediocre suit cost $500, and
shoes $60 to $90. Commonest neces
aries were so difficult to obtain one
had to stand in line for hours to pur
chase a tiny portion at an exorbitant
price. Such were affairs in Vienna
just before the armistice was con
cluded, as related to the correspon
dent by the last American to leave
Austria. He is a member of the di
plomatic service, who was asigned to
remain at the Austrian capital when
war was declared, and has just come
to Switzerland.
No story yet told of conditions in
Vienna can ever remotely approxi
mate actual facts as described by
this eyewitness, whose account was
given, perhaps unconsciously, a
dramatic climax by the declaration
that, despite the indescribable suf
ferings and hardships, Vienna still
has horse racing, attended by greater
crowds than In peace times. These
crowds walk eight miles to the race
tracks and bet thousands of crowns
Instead of hundreds, as formerly, in
their feverish desire to forget the
misery caused by the war.
l.
a mthomv t a it
"V T .?P N J; Ida -— J - A ; Hen
derson of this city has received
telegram from the war department
announcing that his son Seth Hen
derson, was killed In action In
France on October 22. A similar
telegram to Arthur Ritzhamp noti
fies him that his brother, Frank
Ritzhamp, has been killed in action.
These are the first St. Anthony boys
to make the supreme sacrifice over
seas.

TWO YOUNG
IDAHOANS KILLED IN ACTION
a
Miss Carmon Dlckensen, who
h® 611 an employee of the Powers'
Pharm *cy for the past few month,
le f t 8uaday evening for Kansas,
" pend some tlme vls *
TL?i«y*T%L!l er par ® nts *
tlon for Red D Cross'wJrt Yn"ffnee"
and tf help Is still needed there she
expects to leave as soon as she re
ceives her call.
LEAVES FOR KANSAS
has
» i 4 i » i » i » m»n » i » i t i » i » i »
| MARKET REPORT |
tVl 4 I » I * l » l ♦ ! ♦♦ I ♦ 1
Retail Market
be
hot,
in
+
l -» 4 -4- I -» i
Eggs ...
Butter, ranch .
Creamery butter ..
Lard ..
Cabbage .....
Bermuda onions .
Free Silver flour, per cwt_
Yellowstone Special .
Mustang ...
Ham .
Bacon . !. .
Chickens, dresed .
Spring chickens, dressed .
Wholesale Market
.75
spores
pop
kind
im
the
lack
with
In
user,
to
im
hair.
by
is
In
due
that
use
?"
dis
re
of
and
®
but
anv
the
to
be
are
to
is
.50
.70
.35
.05
.06
6.50
5.50
5.60
.42
.55
.25
.25
Oats .
Barley..
Hard wheat
Soft wheat .
Potatoes ....
2.30
2.20 to 2.30
...3.10 3.16
...3.06 3.13
1.15
NOTICE FOR BIDS
Notice is hereby given that bids
will be received by the undersigned,
secretary of the People's Canal &
Irrigation Co. for the delivery at the
head of the company's canal system
250 cords of rock, 100 cords to be
delivered at the lieadgate and 150
cords at a point where the slough
enters the main channel of Snake
river. Rocks weighing over 600
pounds will not be accepted.
Bids should be made for blocks of
fifty cords each. No one is. re
stricted, however, from submitting
bid for the whole amount. The
board of directors will meet at More
land, Idaho, at 12 noon on Decem
ber 7 (Saturday) to consider bids
Submitted and allow contracts for
hauling the rock.
All bids should be addressed to
the undersigned secretary at. More
land, Idaho and should reach him no
later than Friday, Dec. 6. The board
reserves the right to reject any and
all bids, and provide for the haul
ing of the rock by other methods if
it deems it necessary.
(Signed)
The
W. T. ENGLAND,
President.
H. A. BENSON,
Secretary.
20a-2mf
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many
friends and the lodges for every kind
ness shown us In the sickness and
death of our beloved wife, mother
and daughter.
FRED W. GOFF AND SON,
MRS. BULaH SHORTES,
MRS. E. A. EMMERSON,
LEO PHELPS,
TOM PHELPS,
adv.
HORSES LOST—REWARD
One black gelding, strip in face,
branded h O on right thigh, coming
2 years old, reward of $10.00; 1
buckskin filly branded E N S on right
shoulder, reward $5.00; 1 sucking
colt, strip In face, no brand, reward
$5.00. E. H. Seaman, Shelley, Route
adv. 20-2
2 .
- » -
BUCKS FOR SALE.
I have for sale 5 rambelett reg
istered 2-year-old bucks.
Bowker, Blackfoot, route 4, phone
19-4 mf
. . .. , , . . .
I , an ^ 8 our who.have t
shown us so many kindnesses and
J. S.
4x8-rl.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to express our heartfelt
, .... . .. . „ ,
™ ho 80 willln e ] y aid ed us during'the
ne8S and a * ; the death of our
precious wife, mother, sister and
daughter, also for the floral offerings.
It is these expressions of love and
sympathy that help us to bear the
burden, which is so lieavv.
* THE LANTIS AND
PROUSE FAMILIES.
TEACHERS' JSX AM IN ATIONS
The regular teachers' examinations
j tor all classes of certificates will be
j hold at Blackfoot,-December 19, 20,
and 21, 1918. Examinations will
be S in promptly at 8.30 each morn
tog.
GRACE FAULCONER,
County Superintendent.
2t)a-5mf.
one
pur
con
di
to
in
by
was
a
in
County Superintendent.
2t)a-5mf.
L_
Ymvdvuse ,
' „ PQood and True
etf That ws now
-Za are WAKING You
SSL*
THIS IS THE MEAT MARKET
where the promise is preformed.
We promise to treat you
litely and we surely do. We*
promise to faithfully sferve you
at all times with the best grade
of meats, and we most certainly
do that very thing.
CENTRAL MEAT MARKET
The Oualily Shop
l. 3: DORE & SONS
In
po
a
Chib Cafe
*
OPEN AGAIN
I have purchased the Clnb Cafe
and removed it to DeKay's
Cigar Store... Try It.
BIGGER, BETTER,
BRIGHTER
ROY S. DeKAY

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