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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, December 17, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1918-12-17/ed-1/seq-3/

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«5TH field ARTILLERY BRIGADE
HEADQUARTERS AND 143RD
REGIMENT ABOARD.
War Department Considers Matter
Demobilizing 145th Field
Artillery at Fort
Douglas.
Of
Washington—Suiling of four army
transports bringing additional units
from France was announced Friday by
the war department. The ships are the
transports H. R. Mallory, Rappahaii
uuck, Leviathan and Celtic, with about
men.
The Rappahannock sailed December
6 and the other vessels December 8
The Leviathan brings casual companies
Nos. 301 to 313. inclusive; 1419 hos
pltal patients, 500 casuals und the Sec
ond anti-aircraft sector.
The - Celtic brings headquarters
Third battalion; headquarters company
and medical detachment of the 814th
ploneer Infantry (colored); casual
companies Nos. 1051 to 1057, inclusive;
220 patients and several civilians. '
The Mallory has on board the head
quarters sanitary detachment, ord
nance detachment, headquarters com
pany, band, supply company and a
and B batteries of the 143rd field ar
tillery regiment; the Sixty-fifth field
artillery brigade headquarters and 921
sick and wounded.
The 118th field artillery, complete,
sailed from France on December 9 on
the transport Martha Washington, the
department announced later. On the
same ship were training cadres of the
Thirty-eight division and the head
quarters compdny of the 116th field
artillery and a number of casuals and
639 sick and wounded.
The Sixty fifth brigade headquarters
includes Brigadier General Richard W.
Young and his staff, and it may be
assumed that the general is among
those on the way home.
MOBS CONTROL MONTREAL CITY
Police and Firemen Go on Strike for
Increased Wages.
Montreal.—More than 1500 men of
the four organized city services struck
Thursday for higher wages. The official
estimate by E. R. Decary, chairman
of the city commission, of the number
out was: Police, 844; firemen, 550;
garbage incineration department, 150;
engineers and others employed at the
low-level pumping station in the wa
terworks, 16.
With every policeman and virtually
every fireman in the city on strike for
higher wages, Montreal is helpless in
the hands of rioters. Fire stations
have been wrecked, citizens robbed
and stores looted. Saloons and dis
orderly resorts are wide open. Law
abiding citizens are helpless to prevent
the depredations of gangs of hood
lums.
Mayor Martin has been in confer
ence with representatives of the po
licemen and firemen in an effort to
reach a settlement. The men are said
to have agreed to accept a yearly wage
of $1200, $1300 and $1400, according
to length of service. They also want
the double-shift system.
The trades and labor council is said
to have offered to act as a mediating
body between the city administration
and the strikers.
GERMAN FOREIGN MINISTER RE
SIGNS.
Dr. 8olf's Presence in Government
8avored Much of Teuton Regime.
Berlin.—Dr. W. S. Soif, the minister
of foreign affairs, has handed in his
resignation, which has been accepted
by the cabinet.
The foreign minister's retirement
does not come as a surprise, as his
relations with the Independent Social
ist wing of the Ebert-Haase cabinet
reached the straining point some time
ago.
Dr. Solf's continued presence in the
government has been vehemently ob
jected to by the more radical of the
German political elements as savoring
too much of the old German regime,
and a campaign has been ln progress
against him. The demands for bis re
tirement were specifically voiced ln
resolutions adopted by the soldiers'
and workmen's council at Berlin and
emphatic calls came from Bavaria
that he be eliminated.
Aerial Acrobatica Forbidden.
Washington.'—Low flying and acro
batics by military aviators during cele
brations in the vicinity of cities, towns
and building are forbidden under
threatened penalties in an order today
by the war department. A depart
ment announcement 'said Increase in
the flying accidents on home training
fields since the armistice had made
action necessary.
Colorado Springs Firemen Resign.
Colorado Springs.—Resignations of
every member of the fire department,
except the chiefs, were accepted by
the city council Thursday. The men,
thirty-live in number, resigned because
their request for Increased wages was
refused.!
Piez Appointed to Succeed Schwab.
Washington.—Formal announcement
was made Thursday by the shipping
hoard that Charles IMez has been elect
ed director general of the Emergency
Fleet corporation to succeed Charles
1.L Schwab, who resigned last week.
Charting of the Woodrow Wilson air
I way by Unl ted States military avia
I tors w111 he undertaken about Jnnu-i
' ary according to word received here
from . the department of military aero
nautlcs -
The next step In the charting of the
transcontinental airways will be taken
by ® an Biego airmen next week when
they wlu «y to Needles and return.;
™ 8 complete the mapping of
Arizonn and California. The airmen
wl H then swing into Utah, Nevada
and Wyoming with the main operating
base at Salt Lake City.
Colonel Harvey Burwell, commander
of Rockwell field, said today that the
atr men who wUl fly to Needles and
then carry on the air mapping work
ln Utah have not yet been selected. It!
ls belleve d that Major Albert Smith,
who ls " ow en rout e to the Atlantic on
an air mapping tour, will be selected
for the Utah, Wyoming and Nevada ;
" ork because of his experience ana ;
8klu
AERIAL . MA,L ROUTE soon to be
mapped out by u. s.
MILITARY AVIATORS.
Woodrow Wilson Aerial Highway Ex
• tends From San Diego, Cal., to
New York and Includes Prin
cital Intermountain Cities.
I
According to Major Theodore Mac
Cauley, it will be necessary for aerial
0,4111 carrlA-^ engaged in transcontin
ental fl ights to leave many cities either
** before sunrise or a few minutes
after sunset. MacCauley found on his
recent flights to San Diego from Fort
Worth, Tex., that swirling air currents
'"variably are found between 5 and
8 a. m. and 2 and 6 p. m. over cities
that are Seated in great valleys or at
the base of high foothills or moun
talns - These currents are caused by
tl)fi warm air in the valleys lifting and
the downward rush of cold air from
the mountains to take the place of the
warm air. At one period during his re
feet for thirty minutes by a blast of
cold air rushing down into the Imperial
valley from the Jacumba mountains.
MacCauley had a similar experience
near Wellton Ariz
j 1 * 1 * Woodrow wjyrn .«««! highway
extends from Sun Diego to San Fran
cisco, thence to Rena, Salt Laek City,
Ogden, Kansas City, Chicago and New
York. It is understood that this will
he the first cloud line limited mail
.. , „
after leaving Kansas City westbound,
The actual flying time will be about
twenty-four hours. Giant Handley
Page airplanes equipped with 750
horsepower motors and with a speed
of 105 miles an hour are to be em- !
ployed in all trans-continental aerial
mail work, according to present plans.
service to be put in operation. Air
men estimate that it will be necessary
to maintain an altitude of 10,000 feet
Agricultural Land is Opened.
A proclamation restoring to entry
~ . 3
6 ac 88 and * n tba Sevlar "a
tional roreet in Garfield and Iron
counties was signed by President Wil-1
son before he sailed for Europe. The
land is In scattered districts and ls
said to be rich for agricultural pur
rr„ no ' been
y d and ^ or bb 3 reason It cannot be
filed upon by homesteaders before
January 15.
No Profiteering In Idaho.
Pocatello, Idaho.—There will be
profiteering in this state, says the state
food administration. So far
no
there
have been no cases reported to the
administration of violation of the act,
Rnd to prevent ainy such occurrences
Food Administrator R. F. Bicknell has
sounded a timely warning'to all deal
ers In the state to maintain the price
schedules that have been effectiv dur
ing the war.
American Soldiers Courteous.
Amsterdam. — Rhenish newspapers
received here contain a dispatch de
scribing the passage of the Forty
second American division
Coblenz. It says the Americans
very courteous. They only demand the
surrender of arms, not otherwise Inter
fering with the citizens. The news
papers are enjoying full liberty of pub
lication. . '
toward
were
Americans Reach the Rhine.
Washington.—The American
army
of occupation marching Into Germany
has reached the Rhine. General Per*
shing under date of December 10, re
ported :
"The American Third army continu
lng its advance into Germany today
readied the Rhine from Rolandseck
ho Brohl, and at nightfall was on the
general line: Rolnndseck-Brohl-Was
senach-Munsterniaifeld-Rhelnbollen."
of enemy
countries nr aliens who live in them
are to be denied pensions under a bill
Victor Berger Placed on Trial.
Chicago.—Victor L. Berger, congress
man-elect from Milwaukee, with four
co-defendants, is on trial here in the
federal district court before Judge
Landis on a charge of violating the es
pionage act.
No Pensions for Enemy Aliens.
Washington.—Subjects
to he introduced 111 the senate by Sen
rtor Reed Smoot.
M, Bit of prance
I: and Prench
* By Mrs. Byrd Trego.
We are printing a short story of
the records of Pershing and Foch to
day by request. To those who are
inclined, "The World Works" for
November contains an article en
titled "The Life of General Pershing.
His Boyhood and Entrance at West
Point." Should the inquirer fail to
And a copy at the stands, there is one
at the public library or a call at our
home will find one willingly loaned.
Pershing was born in Laclede,
Llnn county, Mo., September 13,
186 °- graduated from military acad
'" n \ 88 ®; vtl H f T was " ow , 8eco " tl
1892 be becanS first lieutenant- n
j 1901 captain; in 1906 brigadier gen
J eral. He was stationed in New Mex
j lc °. Arizonia and Dakota in 1890
91; ln Cuba ln 1898; the Philippines
. 1918 an( * then with the expedition
x 6 he wsi^nnonLa m f eptember ;
and in June m7was senJ to France
at the head of our forces In Octo
her, 1917 Pershing was advanced to
the full rank of general.
j General Ferdinanad Foch was born
1 " 1 1°' L ln the town of Tarbe, south
Ecolel school^ 6 Polteehnl™!®' 1 fr ° m
Poltechnique
as an
j *
• In the course of the careful nurs
iag 0{ our be8t breed of cows with a
'„ H W them a8 i arge an< ? fat
; 80 me of our more enthusiastic ^airy 8
; men have sometimes Earned d *f a'
; future milkgiver as big as a whale
j.and yielding precious fluid in pro
j Portion, but it has been left tor Prof,
^ ytle - 8tate veterinarian of Oregon,
• fh th6 „u d °, m ^ tlca H° n d
I borage " he saSs^mav ^e
swatted some day by domesticating
the whale. With the whole Pacific
ocean as a farm, the domesticated
Avhale would put the Oregon dairy
on a m ammoth scale.
to^nis^^bo™tTbkrrel^of 0 mUk
a milking, and while at presenfthey
are a little too shy to be exactly
classed as easy milkers, some day
they will be domesticated. Tilla
mook Bay. tor instance, might be
ma< ^ e a ®ood barnyard for milk
their young, it would appear the Ore
gon professor is at least partly seri
ous < afld a » it is estimated that the
whale lives eight or nine centuries,
tbe enormous value of a single "milk
;.VtSTSi^1™^"^'
the yield Ln each case will be a barrel
a day for 900 years, the desirability
of "domesticating" them admits of
"o argument. But who is to do the
milking. Who, in the first place, is
to go out and drive home these great
cows of the sea. Shall we run them
down with submarines, take them
in tow and beach them? Are we to
establish a whate-milking branch of
war work and impress into the ser
vice both
spectacular mermaids of the Annette
KeBernmn type? Prof. Lytle wiTl
ave ,«1°"® J?™? again '
tical F & PraC '
MILKING WHALES
sea-divers and all our
So
THE HELPING HAND
^_ E '® ry . ? olbie f returning from
France is loud in his praise of the
Red cross, not only because of its
' sorvice among the sick and wounded
but because of the manifold
which it has aided the soldiers
j and ke P t them in touch with their
familles - R has been extremely dif
their families and vice versa. It
has not been possible to send this
information thru official channels
and the Red Cross has preforme 1
most of this service.
For example: A mother in this
Country is anxious about her boy,
who has not written home tor some
time. She makes Inquiry thru the
proper bureau of the Red Cross at
Washington. This request is for
warded to France and a R°d Cross
searcher is immediately assigned to
locate the boy. In a short time lie
is found and the anxious mother is
relieved by,word from him or as to
his condition if he has been injured.
If he has been killed the exact place
of his burial is furnished and a
photograph of the grave will later be
sent to the family. In this manner
also the Red Cross has located men
in German prison camps and relieved
the anxiety of the parents and friends
by advising them of their condition.
The Red Cross has also been ex
.tremely helpful to the families of
soldiers and sailors. In many cases
allowances to wives and mothers and
allotments under the war insurance
law have been delayed. The Red
Cross has furnished temporary aid
to thousands of such dependents.
Far more Important, however,
than any financial assistance is the
other class of help that has been ex
tended to the families of soldiers,
such as in cases of sickness and in
ability to keep in touch with loved
ones at the front. The public should
bear this in mind when asked to re
new membership in the Red Cross
and to secure new members. This
grand organization has done much
and It now asks but little from the
people.
ways

CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION
The U. S. civil service commission
announces that a stenographer and
typewriter examination will be held
in this city on January 4, 1919, to
fill positions in federal offices located
in the Eleventh District (Washing
ton, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyom
ing and Alaska.)
Entrance salaries range from $900
to $1200 per annum. Age llmites
eighteen years or over.
Information and application blank
can be obtained from the local sec
fetary, board of civil service ex
am ' ner 8 a t the post office, this city,
or from the secretary Eleventh U. S.
Civil Service District, 303 Post Of
flee Building, Seattle, Wash.
TO THE FLAG
The Hun said,' "They never can do it
They
come thru."
But they did it, some grimly,
madly
For you old Glory, for you.
The boys said, "They doubt our cour
age,
Say we dream things that call not
come true.
But well fight till
them badly
For you, Old Glory, for you.
When at last 'twas made clear to the
nation
That our own boys were needed too
we sent proudly, tho sadly,
For you, Old Glory, for
are weaklings, they can not
some
we've beaten
you.
As we learn of the ones who have
perished
Defending tne red, white and blue,
We will bear it patiently, gladly
Bor mankind, <Md Glory, and you.
artillery man. He
rose rapidly
among military men and acquired
reputation for thoroness and effici
ency. He was appointed, while-lieu
tenant colonel, professor of strategy
and tactics in the Ecole de Guerre
(school of war) and ten yars after
was made director of the institution,
having in the meantime been in com
mand of various branches of the
aerivee. He wrote a book called
"The Principles of War," and an
other entitled "Conduct of War."
At the battle of the Marne, Gen
eral Foch had command of the
French centre, and by his presistent
hammering made the German line
at that point turn back.
. . Later he
had general command of the French
and British forces at Ypres, where
they threw the Germans back and
saved the channel ports. He was
placed in supreme command of the
allied armies in March, 1918.
Some have been thinking he fig
ured prominently ln the 1870 war,
but that is a mistake. He was per
haps at that time only thinking of
a military career.
The following clipping is an ex
tract from the New York Times and
reprinted in the Congressional Re
cord, where the writer found it:
"Transport ready for the president
—speacial chef and staff of waiters
and kitchen helpers drafted from
Bilmore—every comfort provided—
orchestra to play during meals and
navy yard band - for deck music to
make the trip to Brest.
"Thru arrangements that are be
ing made by naval officers, under
orders of Adm.ral Gleaves,' Presi
dent Wilson and his guests, includ
In, M. Jusserand, the French am
bassador, will have every comfort
possible on the trip of the transport
George Washington to Brest, which
will begin late tomorrow or earlv
Wednesday.
'The naval cooks, who provide for
th > wardroom of the officers as well
as the crew, will not be required to
cater to the presidential party,
quartered on the promenade decks
Louis Ceres, the chef at the Hotel
Biltmore, with his staff and a crew of
waiters, will board the George Wash
ington today at Hoboken and make
the kitchen, pantry and dining rooms
ready for the guests when they
on board tomorrow. The catering
will be under the direction of J. J.
Menotti, a • restaurant manager at
the Biltmore. He will have fifty
cooks, confectioners, bakers, waiters
and so on with him.
"It is expected that the peace dele-1
gates and the other guests will board
the George Washington at pier 4, Ho
boken, on Tuesday before 3 o'clock,
at which hour she will steam out to
Gracesend Bay and anchor to await
the arrival of President Wilson. The
battleship Pennsylvanit, flying the
flag of Admiral Henry t! Mayo, com
mander of the American fleet, will
steam from the Brookyln Navy
Yard to meet the George Washing
ton, with an escort of five of the lat
est and fastest destroyers, which are
said to be capable of steaming forty
knots.
"During the afternoon yesterday
several officers belonging to the
army and navy, with their friends,
who had obtained special
go
passes
from the navy department, visited
the transport and Inspected the suits
and cabin and C deck, which are to
be occupied by the president and
U,
I
PAYING BIG MONEY I
FOR COYOTEJ
/
r
*
wM
u
© 1918 A.B.S. Inc.
N-1. EXTRA URGE
NH LARGE
N?l. SMALL
N? (MEDIUM
N9 2
N9 3
N9 4
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
EXTRA TO AVERAGE EXTRA TO AVERAOE
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
AS TO SITE R QUALITY
UT08LKMUAUTV
AS TO SUE «
HEAVY
FURRED, CASED
OPEN AND
HEADLESS
28.00to23.00
22.00tol8.00
20.00tol8.00
16.00 to 1400
12j00(o10.00
16.00 to 14.00
12.00tolQ.00
12 . 00(0 6.00
9.00 to 5.00
3.00to ZOO
2L00to 150
1.50to .75
1.00 to JO
(ME
9.00to 7.00
HEAVY
20.00 to 17.00
16.00 to 1100
15.00tol2.00
12.00tol0.00
10.00 to 850
8.00to (LOO
750to 550
5i00to 400
750lo450
6.00to 3.00
ljOOto 50
JSto 35
250to 150
2.00to LOO
LYNX CAT™"®
ORDINARY
WINTER
275(0 230
225to 1.90
210k) 155
150to 150
SHOT, DAMAGED
AND KITTS
AT HIGHEST
MARKET VALUE
L70to 150
150io 120
L30to 1.10
L25to JO
55 to .60
50to .40
55 to 25
FALL
1.00b 50
CATCH 'EM—SKIN 'EM-SHIP 'EM
We Want All the Idaho Furs You Can Ship
COYOTE, LYNX CAT, MUSKRAT, and all other JPur•bearers collected in your section in
strong demand. A shipment to SHUBERT" will bring you "more money"—"quicker."
GET A SHIPMENT OFF-TODAY. You'll b« mltfhty gUd yon did.
Thu* extremely high prieee quoted for immediate ehipment.
SHIP YOUR FURS
DIRECT TO
A'B'SHUBckx a. //vc.
THE LARGEST HOUSE. LN THE WORLD DEALING EXCLUSIVELY /AT -
AM E Bt IC AN R AW FU R S
2 . 0 - l 1 W.Austin Ave. I — Chicago, U.S.A.
Time Is Money
Why not look around before making
Xmas purchases or before buying your
ter s supply of groceries, and see where you
can buy the best goods for the least
your
win
money.
following are some of our regular
prices which show you a great saving:
SUGAR CURED MEATS
Swift's lianis, per pound .
Swift's picnics, per pound
Armour's Breakfast bacon, per pound
Dry - s»*t bacon, per pound .
40c
32c
SOc
35c
SHORTENING
No. 10 White Cloud .
5 pound net White Cloud
2 pound net White Cloud
No. 10 Clicfo Shortening ..
No. 3 Cliefo Shortening .
1 quart Mazo|a oil .
1-2 gallon Mazola all .
1 gallon Mazola oil .
Small Cottolene ..
Medium Cottolene .
Large Cottolene ..
.$ 2.00
.$1.75
70c
.$2.65
.$1.35
75c
$1.45
$2.79
05c
$1.30
$3.00
MISCELLANEOUS
No. 7 box macaroni .
Skinner's Golden Egg, Golden Age, or Almo Brand macaroni
package .
Cream cheese per pound . ..
2 pound cake of A-l codfish
1 pound can tall pink salmon .
1-2 pound can flat red salmon ...
6 boxes matches .
2 1-* gallons sour or sour mixed pic kels per keg
1-2 pound Hershey's cocoa .
1 pound Hershey's cocoa.
1 pound can School Boy peanut butter .
2 1-2 pound can School Boy peanut butter.
5 pound can School Boy peanut butter.
50 pound block salt ..
100 pound sack of stock salt. .].
1 pound can plum jam, 2 cans for .
Borden's Eagle Brand milk .
2 1-2 can Empson's hominy 2 cans for .
Feet's bath tablets .
Creme Oil toilet soap. . .
Palmolive soap, per cake
Borax washing powder per package
LigKthonse cleanser, per can .
Shrimps per can ..
Libby's Rex or Veribest brands corn beeir, per can
Libby's Chilli Con Came ...
Walker's Chilli Con Carne
Climax Pork and Beans, per
10 pound dark Karo syrup
9 pound bag rolled oats .
9 pound bag com meal .
9 pound bag germade .
9 pound bag graham flour .
10 pound bag hominy grits .
Quaker's, Sun Ripe, Carnation or Mother's oats, per package
We carry a full line of Xmas candles, nuts and fruits.
Mixed nuts.:.
Mixed candy .
Sweet apple cider per gallon
85c
per
10c
40c
45c
20c
15c
35c
$1.15
23c
45c
35c
80c
$1.60
58c
85c
25c
25c
25c
3 for 25c
3 for 25c
10c
5c
5c
15c
35c
15c
2 for 25c
can
10c
A.
95c
85c
75c
65c
65c
90c
35c
«.3 pounds for $1.00
.3 pounds for $1.00
60c
Skaggs' Cash Grocery
Bridge street
Blackfoot
Mrs. Wilson and the guests. An
orchestra will go along to play dur
lng luncheon and'dinner, and the
brass band from the navy yard will
play on deck and when the George
Washington enters the harbor of
Brest, which is expected to be on
December 11 or 12, depending on the
time she leaves New York.
Our president has seemingly over
stepped a bit. He has been known
for his simplicity in the home life
at the White House; has dispersed
/with stately social functions |faat
have been customs since the begin
nlng with our chief executives. He
has assured us of the practice of war
economies such as we were re
quested to conform to. He has been
holding the skein of yarn for knitters
who were weaving the thread into
warm sox for the boys. In fact we
have been taught he was one of us
in every least and greatest movement
for the saving of money, time and
necessary things to carry on the war
and save starving, freezing Europe
Now while our overseas boys are
adopting war orphans, argeelng to
care for and school 500 of them for
a year, contributing for this fund
.willingly and voluntarily from their
small pitance, our president sees lit
to journey to them and a republic
whose vacant fireside seats full
cemeteries and empty larders de
mand solicitations ln keeping the
"faith of victory" and not the im
pious feast of Belshazzar with its
glare and show of tinsel

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