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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, December 20, 1918, Image 1

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®lt0 ilitalui Stpjntbltnm
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CITY AND COUNTY
$3 a Year
BLACKFOOT, BINGHAM COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY DECEMBER 20, 1918
Vol. XV. No. 23
LIEUT. BRALEY
RETURNS HOME
Served as Aero Man,
Very Enthusiastic Over
Experiences.
Lieut. Wayne Braley, son of Mr.
and Mrs. G. L. Braley of this city
returned home Tuesday afternoon,
after a year's training in various
aviation
and
aeronautic schools
fields.
After several month conscientious
and extensive training at the school
of military aeronauthics in Berkley,
Cal. Mr. Braley was transferred to
Texas and in that state it was that
he put on the finishing touches to his
work At first he trained as a pilot
and found that work very interest
' Jng and adventerous, but because of
' the anxiety he expressed to see over
seas service and his determination to
get into real activities if possible, he
was transferred to a fighting ob
server squadron that he might sooner
prepare himself for duties in France.
The work of the Jgnti.ig observer
consists of directing the pilot, oper
ating machine guns, drawing maps
and taking aeronautic pictures. It
1 b considered a branch of the great
est importance. After a fighting ob
server has received his training,
which is always a thoro one in all
branches of air work, he is qualified
to handle any work to which he
might be assigned and instruct in ajl
branches of warfare, but they must
first be qualified before they can in
struct in branchs of aeronautics.
Mr. Braley is very enthusiastic
about flying and says he made hun
dreds of trips many miles into the
He states it is rather thrilling
and sentational to be many, many
miles up in the clouds and do the/
little tippirfg, diving and curving
stunts that he became quite accus
tomed to, and that the air has been
righfully named when it is called a
field of battle, as it is indeed all of i
that when scores of planes ascend |.
and do all the maneuvers common ,
in that work. Mr. Braley saw num
accidents and near accidents,
air.
erous
hut was very fortunate himself. He
mentioned one accident that occured
just before he left the field in which
he narrowly escaped being brought
to earth and possibly injurd. Two
planes above him got confused some
and clashed together and im
way
mediately and suddenly began to de
fend and it took quick work to fly
from under them to avoid being
brought to earth unexpectedly. His
last trip tooa him 200 miles into
the air.
Mr .Braley received his commis
sion as
months ago, and upon completing nis
course he was assigned to act in the
capacity of instructor in the various
divisions or branches and enjoyed
the work immensely. He has been
furloughed to a reserve and received
his discharge at Selfridge Field,
Mich., after being there about two
months. He expressed much disap
pointment at not being sent to
France and having a chance to take
part in active service. He came home
by way of Chicago and Omaha and
othr middle-western cities of interest
and enjoyed the Journey very much.
It was his pleasure to visit portions
of Canada and Mexico during the
year he has been in the service.
When asked what he intended to
do now that he waB released and
hom once more ,he very emphatic
ally said" Get a job and go to
work."
second lieutenant three
BLACKFOOT MAN
BLACKFOOT MAN
ILL'AND RETIRED
Moise Gagnoh, who has a home
east of Blackfoot, has been confined
to his home or premises for a long
time by partial paralysis. Prior to
the time of this misfortune he was
one of the busy men about town. At
present he does not get out of the
hoiibe much, and he is unable to talk,
' ,1,h
The sons and daughters of the
Gagnon family were prominent in
the work of the boys' and girls' club
last summer, and won prizes for sup
erior vegetables and musk mellons.
They say the secret of having sweet
musk melons lies in having them
started early so they will have the
hot weather in which to mature,
rather than the cool weather near
the end of summer. Starting the
plants under protection, either in
shelter and then transplanting or
by covering them individually or
keeping the plants almost buried in
the soil till the season of frosts has _
passed helps to advance them.
Mrs. Gagnon expressed diaap- {
pointment over the contest in the j
nie club saying they had some fine
pifs, but that the local government
judge, who was to go out to see them
Hid not arrive ,and that left them
oft of the report. She said the child
ren had the benefit of good pigs,
but still It was a disappointment to
them to be in the contest all season
and then not get a viewing and a
record.

SLATED FOR EARLY RETURN
In the list* of-units designated for
early return from France, given oat
by General March, the following, in
cluding 125 officers and 4013 men,
have not been previously mentioned:
Company F, 819th engineers, of
the eighth (regualr) division; the
second, fifth, sixth and seventh
heavy mobile ordnance repair shop
units; the fourth and fifth anti
aircraft machine gun battalions and
companies D, E, F, G, H, I, andK of
the second engineers.
■STjui
illyr Jtrfit GUjriatmaf
And there were in the
same country shepherds
abiding in the field, keep
ing watch over their flock
by night.
And, lo, the angel of the
Lord came upon them, and
the glory of the Lord shone Si
round about them; andl*
they were sore afraid.
And the angel.said unto
f them, fear not; for, behold, ^
I bring you good tidings of vjjj
great joy, which shall be to
all people. > _ Sjjtf
Xjs, For unto you is born this
day in the city of David a S4
Al Saviour, which is Christ M
fw the Lord. . _ 0
And this shall be a sign 3j
unto you. Ye shall find
tjx the babe wrapped in swad- s
« dling clothes, lying in aS
on
He
his
in
lege
has
met
all
two
of
a
i
|.
manger. m
And suddenly there was *sr
with the angel a multitude W
-k of heavenly host praising M
God, and saying, $?.
|S Glory to God in the xLg
"b highest, and on earth peace,
|5 good will toward men.
And it came to pass, as
Jj£ the angels were gone away M
from them into heaven, the M
shepherds said one to an-S|jl
k other: Let us now go even **
unto Bethlehem, and see
this thing which is come to
?£ pass, which the Lord hath jjj\£
made known unto us. ' xjrf
And they came with
^ haste, and found Mary, and $4
i Joseph, and the babe lying *V
£ in a manger. *Sj
j And when they had seen *j;
, pg jt they made known abroad $6
.d p w u: rh w -«. tn id
$5 the saying which was tola a
them concerning the child.
And all they that heard vyi
it wondered at those things v
which were told them by 31
the shepherds.
But Mary kept all these Sj
things, and pondered them 3 ?
in her heart. • 0
And the • shepherds re
turned, glorifying and 0
praising God for all the*E
things that they had heard %
and seen, as it was told
unto them. ll
sas.
apt
is
to
It
of
in
be
fly
to
to
to
—St. Luke ii: 8 - 20 .
FORMER BLACKFOOT
RESIDENT PASSES AWAY
Mrs. Frank W. Randall, wife of
Dr. Randall, age thirty-five years,
died at her home in Douglas, Ariz.
Monday afternoon, after suffering an
attack of influenza-pnumonla.
Mrs Randall was a former resi
iSAJSf3S. "JS i
Is a sister of Mrs. Leon Messlin of ,
this city. During her residence here
she made a host of friends, who will
regret to hear of her sudden death.
Her pleasant smile and kind ways
Won her many friends wherever she
lived.
Deceased is survived by her hus
band, one daughtor, her parents,
four'sisters and three brothers.
Funeral services were held in
Douglas, Ariz., where interment was
made
in
to
At
the
Dr. O. A. Hoover ot the C 0««7
the board of health in sp ® a ^ ing .. th .®
in influenza Wednesday, said tha t it is
nearly stamped out In the town of
Biackfoot, but that there is a great
deal in the country. It is not show
Ing such virulent form as it was and
he believed it is due to th« tact that
the people are learning to go to bed and
stay there until they get over it.
Most of the serious cases, he said,
the were traceable directly to some ex
in posure or efforts to bear up or do
or something they ought not to after
or the attack or to getting out too soon
in wh ®" convelascing
has _ T *je docor says the way to treat
the flu is to go right to bed and stay
{ there until at lea8t twenty-four
the j hours after the flu to done with the
fine oatlent. The vital thing is getting
Into bed early and not getUng am
bitious near the close of the race.
SUE TO RECOVER
to
a

DR. HOOVER TALK8
ABOUT INFLUENZA

STOCK SUBSCRIPTION
Suit was filed in the Firth district
court by Attorneys Ivan L. JenBen
and Ralph W .Adair for the recovery
of $12,810, subscribed by seventeen
residents of Shelley, Idaho, and
vicinity toward the capitalization of
the Liberty Insurance company, a
proposed casualty company, for
which an Idaho charter was refused
by the state banking department,
being assumed as with the restric
tions of the so-called blue-sky law.
The seventeen subscribers assigned
their respective claims, which range
from $210 to $3000 to T. W. Shelley,
who appears as plaintiff: Beauchamp,
Moag ft Beauchamp, a corporation,
and L. F. Tucker, defendants.—Salt
Lake Tribune.
a
for
oat
in
men,
of
the
shop
anti
and
of
PIONfeER DOCTOR
PASSES AWAY
Succumbs to Kidney Trouble After
Suffering Only a Few Days
Dr. John B. Cooper, age eighty
years, died at the family residence j
'
on West Bridge street Monday after
noon, after suffering only a few days.
He has been ailing for about a
month, but continued his work with
his patients.
Dr. Cooper was born in England
in 1837. After graduaing from col
lege there hfe practiced for some
time in his old home. He came to
America and located in Weir City, I
Kan., but later moved to Spanish
Fork, Utah, where he practiced a
short time. He came to Blackfoot
twenty-one years ago and has prac
ticed continuously since that time.
Dr. Cooper was the oldest physi
cian in Blackfoot and during his
residence here has made many
friends among the people whom he
has cared for, as well as those he has
met in everyday life. He was re
spected and held the confidence of
all who knew him.
Deceased is survived by his wife,
two sons, Dr. George Cooper who is
stationed at Fort Riley, Kan. and
Thomas, who is also living in Kan
Members of the family who are
here for the funeral are the sons
Thomas Cooper, Dr. George Cooper,
their daughter Mrs. Emily Gibson
of Idaho Falls and Mrs. Cooper's
sons, Joseph, William and Richard
Batten from Columbus, Kansas and
Thomas Jones and wife from Wyom
ing.
sas.
In speaking of some men, we are
apt to say unconsciously, "He was a
man of the old school," and by that
is meant he was true to his raising
and his training. Such men usually.;
have to be known rather intimately;
to be appreciated. One difficulty}
about knowing them intimately is]
that they do not press themselves'complished
upon other people's acquaintance.,
It was so with Dr. Cooper. He was
thoro going and true to duty's call.;
He was very loyal and steadfast,
with his patients. If a patient
needed attention twenty-four hours
of the day to make sure of winning'
in the race for life, then Dr. Cooper
would be right there studying the
;symptoms all that time, and doing
what the moment demanded. Many
among the living owe their life to his
steadfastness and faithfulness at the
crisis in their illness.
He was fatherly in his relations
with men and their families. If a
man needed a good talking to, to get
him to realize his failures, Dr.
Cooper was not afraid to take him
aside and tell him in very plain
Bnglish where his duty lay and
where his mistakes had been made,
But he was kindly about it. He was
human. He was firm.
One thing in Dr. Cooper's life that
challenged the admiration of all was
his home life and his never failing
fellowship for Mrs. Cooper. Together
they sat and rested. Together they
walked out and together they came
back.
And now comes the parting.
.Words have not been coined that
The body will be taken to Idaho
Falls, where funeral services will
be held and interment made at that
place.
OBITUARY
i -m sr *«—£"5S
, left J )eh i lad ' t0 , the great 81
du ® *° *"® Xmnur fleure on our
He was afa™» llar fl 8 ure on o
streets, but he is gone.

HOW ONE HONOR
MEDAL WAS WON
Ethel Lyngberg, fifteen, who lives
in Salt Lake county, Utah, will have
pinned on her the four-leaf clover
medal which is awarded members of
boys' and girls' clubs, who for four
consecutive years have done success
ful work in their clubs. In the past
season, besides attending high school
Ethel plowed sixty acres of land and
harrowed and leveled it for wheat,
alfalfa and beets and in season
helped her father cut hay. She also
assisted with irrigation In
(father'* absence, turning the water
on and off alone. She canned t>60
quarts of fruits and vegetables and
dried many pounds. Meanwhile, she
was baking the bread for the family.
One hundred chickens grew to ma
turity during the summer under her
In her spare moments, she
has knitted socks for soldiers. When
She finishes high school, Ethel plans
to attend a college where she may
study agriculture and home econom
her
care.
ics.
-+■
ROOMING HOUSE
CHANGES HANDS
The Anderson rooming house on
Bridge street has changed hands a
O. S. Evans having leased it. The
entire building has been given a
thoro renovation and everything is
spic and span. The rooms are com
fortably fitted with all the modern
conveniences such as steam heat, hot
and cold water, electric lights and
bath.
Mr. Evans says he will conduct
the business in a manner that will be
a credit to the city of Blackfoot
rather than detrament and they will
cater to business from respectable
people only and everything possible
will be done to make the guests feel
at home.

SKATING PARTY
The Misses Eileen Younle, Loa
Martin, Eva Jones, Lillie Jordon and
Neomi Ridd and Messers Carr Beebe,
Claude Uost, Charlese Hendrie, Meril
Boyle and Ray Stephens spent Mon
day evening at the river skating.
MARION JUST
PASSES AWAY!
Succumbs to Dropsey After Suffering
Severely for Several Months
Not
The
Marian Agnes, the beloved daugh
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Just of
Presto, departed this life at Redonda,
Cal. Tuesday morning, Dec. 17, after
suffering severely for some time with
dropsey.
Marion was bright and cheerful and
had her pleasing little smile ready
for all, even tho she suffered in
tensely. The family took her to
California about two weeks, think
ing the change would benefit her, but
she slowly grew worse until the
end came.
Miss Just was born at Presto, Ida.
seventeen years ago and spent many
happy years at the parental home at
that place. She received her educa
tion in the schools of that vicinity
with the exception of two years
which she spent at the Blackfoot
high school, where she completed a
business course,
associates who will miss their little
school mate are numerous indeed
The remains were brought to
Blackfoot Thursday afternoon and
interment made in the Grove City
cemetery. She is survived by a de
voted mother and father ,two sisters
and one brother,
All during her illness
The friends and
SAFEGUARDING PEACE
The world is glad enough to have
peace, but considering the diabolical
plots for the subjugation of the
world which the Germans so deliber
ately planned and so ruthlessly at
tempted to Aecute, are we justified
in feeling that such a peace is real
and secure if these people are al
lowed to go where and do what they
please in the world?
The administration Of adequate
punishment to all war-responsible
Germans may be impracticable, but
the safety of the world would see ™
to demand that measures shall a
least be taken which will. ma e
possible always to identify those who
are in any way responsible for this
despicable attempt to destroy or en
siave the world. This could be ac
by the making and filing
for reference at all times, at con
venient points in every civilized
country on the globe, of complete
identification cards, (including
photographs, Bertillon measurements
and finger-prints, together with the
war record as far as ascertainable)
;Pf all Germans before they are al
lowed to leave their fatherland
Laws might also well be imssed by
this and other countries prohibiting
an such persons from becoming citl
zensor reaidentsunless they first
satisfactorily establish the fact that
they have taken no part whatever
in starting the war or in the Ger
man outrages incident thereto and
are otherwise fit for such citizenship
or residence. ..
This may seem like a very consid
erabie taskbut itis to
entirely feasible and which involves
no real hardship or injustice to any
Germans who are innocent of wrong
doing in connection with the war. It
is merely a reasonable and fairly ef
fective method of keeping tab on a
people who have demonstrated be
yond all question that they are a
menace to the peace and welfare of
the world.
He

JAKE MULVILLE
SOON TO COME HOME
A telegram was received Wednes
day by Mrs. Emma Ashton from her
Jake Mulville saying he would
be home soon. At the time the tele
gram was sent he was at Tacoma,
Wash.
The following story was taken
from one of the papers at Jackson
ville, Fla., concerning Jake:
Wrestling Bout
Battling MsMann, of Chicago and
Sergeant Mullivlle of Idaho,
swered the bell in the next fistic af
fair. Both men displayed great
ring mastership and boxed one of the
neatest rounds for some time. The
next round was even better and Mul
ville found several openings left by
McMann and sent several crushing
blows to the midway.
' The final round was a hummer.
Their gloves flew so fast that it was
almost impossible to follow them.
They both displayed ring science
that would make even Benny Leon
ard look envious. T^e crowd cheered
the fighters as they left the right
and were it not the fact that the
camp ban^l played Star Spangled
Banner, many a soldier with a sore
jlhroat woujld ha vie answered sick
call in the morning. The bout was
close that neither boxer could
have been given the decision. It was
the greatest of the greatest bouts
that has ever been staged at any
or cantonment, and it was
son
an
so
camp
worth the while to walk several
miles to see it.

STOCKMEN'S
MEETING POSTPONED
The executive committee of the
Id^ho Clattlb and Horse Growers'
association have indefinitely post
poned the date of holding the an
nual convention of this organization
which was to have been held the mid
dle of January in Boise.
This action was taken on account
of the quarantine thruout the state
bn Spanish influenza.
The convention will be held at
Boise, Idaho, as soon as conditions
will warrant, and announcement of
dates wjlll be made In all of the
papers and the members will be
notified personally by mail.
♦' — 1 —
H. S Luton who lives In the south
side of town is having an addition
built on hto home.
St. Nicholas
Troops
In Camp
'Twas the night before Christmas
and all through the camp
Not a sound could be heard but the
sentry's tramp, tramp.
The boys were all sleeping quite
snug in their bunks
With occasional snoring in good
solid chunks.
Some were a-dreaming of homes far
this
the
when
ness
diers
nights
man
which
of
a
story
it
place
lief
come.
Oct.
tered
on
ravine
the
could
guns
,on
away
And mothers preparing for the
world's holiday;
Others of sweethearts and what they
might send
To brighten the
day and hap
piness lend—
When all of a
sudden there
such a
i
I ,
rose
clatter,
All sprang up to
see what the
world was the
matter;
They rushed to
ward the
Ay
trenches ex
pecting the
Bodies,
Aching to give
them some rather rough punches—
When what to their wondering eyes
should appear
But a convoy deep loaded with
Christmastide cheer—
Parcels and boxes and everything
good—
While high on the pile old St. Nich
§f
had
had
pend
tom
What
had
fine
had
the
side.
olas stood,
A-bowing, and smiling, and beck'
ning to all
And easily looking as though he
might fall.
His face was familiar to all within
sight,
He was given no challenge, so great
was delight.
With a wink of his eye and a twist
of his head
He gave all to know they had noth
ing to dread,
For pausing a moment, he went
straightto Oju r^m Tiiii.
Then to one and
cel he gave, ^ iwtr"
Till each hut was still as a newly
made grave
As the boyB, filled with joy at the
gifts they received,
Hugged them and kissed them, as
though they believed
Those gifts were 'most human. And
Santa looked on
Tight gripping his wheel and toot
ing his horn,
Still bowing and smiling; then
turned to the right
And said "Merry Christmas, w and
"to all a good night.
nad
They
own
and
store
was
knew
the
were
had
them
had
effort
of
that
been
there
there
in
ering
tack
stock
and
last
pal
were
for
Here
kill
tion
him
up
Then
of
of
»
EDMUND OONWAY DIED OF
WOUNDS RECEIVED IN BATTLE
J. J. Conway of this community re
ceived a telegram Monday that his
brother Edmund died of wounds on
November 2. Edmond enlisted In
Co. G of the ©Id Second Idaho just
before the left Boise for Camp
Greene, N. C. over a year ago. He
was then transferred with his com
pany to France and was later trans
ferred to the engineers corps, where
he met a number of Blackfoot boys.
He and Fred Hilliard were bunkles
and when Fred was gassed he was
made corporal in Fred's place.
and
hold
was
of
off,
on
in
and
who
by
air.
and

J. ORVAL DAVIS HOME
J. Orval Davis arrived in Black
foot the first of the week from the
Great LakeB training Btatlon, where
he has been training for the past
six months.
Mr. Davis has received his release
and after spending a short time in
Blackfoot visiting friends he with his
wife and child will leave for Tipton,
Mo., where they will make their
home.
at
of

DICK STEVENS HOME
Dick Stevens arrived In Blackfoot
the first of the week from Camp
Lewis, where he has been In mili
tary training.
He left Blackfoot with one of the
draft contingents a few months ago
and has been at Camp Lewis since
that time.
After spending a few days here
visiting with friends and relatives
he will return to the camp.
Whole Battalion,
Boche Encircled,
Relieved at Last
Troops Caught In Argonne Rescued
After Six Foodless Da>s
One of the great adventures of
this war reached a happy ending in
the early hours of Monday evening
when relief came thru rain and dark
ness to a battalion of American sol
diers that for six unforgettable
nights had been surrounded by Ger
man forces in that blighted jungle
which is known as the Forest of the
Argonne.
The story of that seige, the story
of the dreadful suffering borne with
a high and undaunted spirit, the
story of the defense and rescue when
it can be told in full, will take its
place in history alongside the re
lief of Lucknow and will quicken
American liearbteats for centuries to
come.
From the night of Wednesday,
Oct. 2, to the night of Monday, Oct.
that battalion was isolated on the
northern slope of a bleak, unshel
tered ravine, with the German army
on a cliff above them and with a
powerful German detachment deeply
entrenched on the other side of the
ravine ,so close that the doughboys
burrowed into the hillside could hear
the calls and orders of their enemy,
could be reached by German machine
guns and German rifles if they
showed themselves in the open.
When night settled over the forest
,on Monday last their situation was
What little food they
I ,
desperate,
had had with them was spent on the
second day. For three days they
had been eating plugs of tobacco and
chewing on leaves of the under
brush. For water they had to de
pend on a muddy stream at the bot
tom of the ravine and on one clear,
greatful spring that bubbled there
Invitingly, hut each trip to it meant
exposure to snipers. More than one
doughboy fell in fetching water.
What few blankets and overcoats
had not been discarded in the first,
fine rush which carried the ravine
had long since gone to wrap around
the wounded. For their dead and
wounded lay with them on the hill
side.
Three Attacks Fought off
They were drenched to the skin
nad weak from hunger and long ex
posure to the chill October wind.
They had fought off three savage at
tacks—fought them off with their
own machine guns, their own rifles
and bayonets, their own hand gre
nades—but by the sixth night their
store had so dwindled that there
was little chance of their resisting
successfully another attack.
They knew in their hearts and
knew by their senses that the rest of
the Americans, not more than 1200
meters below them in the forest,
were trying to reach them. They
had seen planes come looking for
them in the interminable fog. They
had seen planes shot down in the
effort to reach them. They had
heard from time to time the sound
of heavy firing nearby. They knew
that the effort to reach them had
been and would be unremitting, but
there had come to the stoutest heart
there doubt that relief would come
in time. Yet in all that beseiged
battalion there was none who
thought for one moment of surrend
ering to the encircling enemy.
The battalion waited its fourth at
tack without much hope, for its
stock of ammunition had run low
and the men were so weak they could
hardly drag themselves to their feet.
Some had written little letters of
farewell to their folks and in there
last hours was entrusting his to some
pal on the chance that the pal
might get thru alive. There
were some thanks whispered shyly
for little unchronicled deeds of
kindness the week had witnessed.
Here and there men promised to
kill each other if it came to a ques
tion of capture.
Rations for the Boys
Then suddnely out of the darkness
voices could be heard balling, "Major
Whitlesey! "
The boys along the line could hear
him answering from his hole In the
ground.
"Major, we've got here!" The
whisperers were exultant. "We're
up on your right. We're here!"
Then a pause. "And—and we've
brought some rations for the boys."
There was a moment ot absolute
silence, and then all along the side
of the ravine could be heard gusts
of hysterical laughter. Relief and
come.
The besieged battalion had gone
forward on the night of the second
and taken its position with orders to
hold it. Into some strongly fortified
German trenches Just to the rear
there filtered a powerful German
force, how powerful can be guessed
from the fact that when that trench
was finally carried, a colonel, two
majors, and their entire staffs were
among the prisoners.
Major Whittlesey, when the dawn
of October 3 showed that he was cut
off, sent back runners with a report
on his position. The runners fell
in their courses. He sent up pigeons
and it was these couriers of the air
who carried the tidings to the other
Yanks in the forest.
Attack after attack was then made
by companion regiments. Relief and
instructions were rushed thru the
air. Airplanes went over again and
again to drop munitions, bandages
and that best of all Iron rations,
chocolate. , .
Such was the lay of the wooded
ravine, such was the fog that the
airmen had to work as tho blind
One great package of sup
near Its mark, but
folded,
plies did come
Continued on page four

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