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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, January 21, 1919, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1919-01-21/ed-1/seq-6/

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"WHY SELL""
EXTEA LARGE
COYOTES FOR
$1523-WHEN
-T'C
m
I'Ll GIVE
YOU ♦15,oo
&
" >2
Hi ft
SHjJBEKfis Paying
f For more than thirty-five years "SHUBERT'
" has been giving Far Shippers an honest and
liberal assortment—paying the highest market
prices—sending returns out promptly— render
• "better service"—"quicker."
©m».AJB.S.. Ine.
iff ft
ing
"SHUBERT" Wants Idaho Fisrs—All Yon Can Ship
A "SHUBERT TAG ENVELOPE" on your shipment means "more money" for §
your Furs—"quicker"—"the beat and promptest SERVICE in the world.
GET A SHIPMENT OFF TODAY
99

Tkess
inotiiion
hcMUi
N?2
N?3
f!? 1, SMALL
N? I,EXTRA LARGE
!!?I.MED!Ur:
NH LARGE
ASTOSIZEaqiMUTY
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
AS TO SIZE 0 QUALITY
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
3.00 to 2.00
2.90to 130
HEAVY .
FURRED.CASED
OPEN AND
HEADLESS
10.00IO 6.00
15.C0tol2.C0
12.C0tol0.00
laCOto 8.CD
8.00 to 6.C3
23.00tol7.C0
28.00to23.C0
22.00tol8.00
COYOTE
l&OOto 14.00
3Dto .49
LOOto .75
UOto S9
100 to 230
1.60 to 130
225 to 1.75
WINTER
MUSKRAT
35 to 25
25to 30
FALL
LOOto 20
LSOto 120
230to 120
120 to 120
SHIP YOUR FURS DIR ECT TO
I A.B. SHUBE Kt, ;nc.
1 TmERIcIn RAW f uRS
iMtfWMIflll 25-27 W, Austin Ave. Dept. 482 Chicago, U.S.A. •
i
KIMBALL
&»i -» r»i '»
Eugene Hutchinson had .the mis
fortune of loosing all of hiB horses.
Getting up one morning he found
one dead and not long after another
one died. He called a veternarian,
but they couldn't determine what the
cause was. When the third one died
they decided it was caused by feeding
the hay that had laid out in the rain.
Being wet too long had caused
poisonous growth on the hay.
P. Harker Is lathing and plaster
ing I ishop Taylor's house this week.
Alley Frandsen has been spending
a few days at Ririe, Idaho.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Anthony spent
Sunday at Jameston and Goshen.
R. Jensen, who recently purchased
a farm In this vicinity, has sold
again.
a
it
Mrs. E. Williams of Wapello has
teen spending a few days visiting
friends and relatives here.
Mrs. C. Lint and Affle Fisher spent
Saturday and Sunday at Blackfoot.
R .L. Bradshaw of Goshen was
a caller at the home of Albert An
thony one day last week.
The Wright family is suffering
with influenza, at present.
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Malm visited
relatives here Sunday.
M. Jensen has been staying with
his daughter at Wapello for a few
days.
An oyster supper was served at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anthony
last week. Those present were Mr.
and Mrs. J. Sparks, Laura Anthony,
Mr. and Mrs. M. Anthony, F. Landon
and Mrs. Arthur Landon.
Bishop Taylor and family
shopping at Firth Thursday.
Miss Laura Anthony is visiting at
Firth for a short time.
Mrs. Arthur Landon is spending
a few weeks in Utah visiting with
relatives and friends.
William Anthony was a visitor at
the home of Joseph Pratt one day
last week
Frank Landon was a business vis
•tor at Blackfoot Saturday.
L. R. Bradshaw of Goshen and
Homer Pope motored to Blackfoot
Monday to see about leasing
land.
were
some
Mrs. E. Williams and Mrs. William
Anthony and daughters spend Wed
nesday visiting with Mrs. E. Hall of
Presto.

l
MORELAND ]
♦ 11 (H 444hw4
Harrison McKnight intends to
make a trip to Hamer, Idaho for the
purpose of getting life insurance pol
icies.
Vernal Leavitt, who has been liv
ing north of Blackfoot, intends mak
ing his home here ln the future.
Irwin Christensen was a Moreland
visitor Sunday.
Mrs. Lee Farnsworth is visiting
with her mother Mrs. Leavitt.
.Florence Wheeler of Firth spent
Sunday here the guest of Ilia Beus.
Mr. Beus and Mr. Munson, who
have been repairing Claude Going's
and Bertin McBride's wells, have
moved their digging outfits to River
I
1
HOW
OA'
YOUlSEE?
[AArWuntate. Ha can toll yo« tha comet intwir.]
POPULAR MECHANICS MAGAZINE
with its four hundred pictures and four hundred articles each month, is bigger
and better than ever. Our correspondents in all parts of the world
continually on the watch for new and interesting things for our readera.
are
POPULAIt MECHANICS MAGAZINE IS FOR SALE BY AU. NEWSDEALERS
Ask them to show you a copy or send 20c for the latest issue, postpaid. Yearly sub
scription $2.00 to all part* of the United States, ha posaesaiona, <*ahada and Mexico!
POPULAR MECHANICS WAOAZIHK, S H. Michigan Avonuo, CMcnao. llHiwte
side, where they will engage in well
digging there.
Mrs. Dollie Idle of Blackfoot vis
ited with her sister-in-law Mrs. W.
W. Young last Wednesday.
Mrs. Myrtle McKnight has a new
baby boy.
Bond brothers are buying and ship,
ing potatoes from here.
All the beets that have been piled
at the dump have been shipped.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Jordan of Po
catello are visiting with Mr. Jordan's
mother.
The following soldiers have re
turned to their homes here: Willie
England, Harold Clrak, Ora Lindsay,
Willie Hatch, Archie Grimmett,
James Christensen and Harvey Jor
dan.
Mrs. Matildia Benson and Mrs.
England are on the sick list.
Mrs. Hattie Guest and Mrs. Mabel
Scott and family were visitors at the
home ot Mrs. Grieves Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Warren were
visitors at the home of Mrs. Rose
Crouch Monday afternoon.
Chester Grimmett, who is working
for the O. S. L. at Lorenzo, Idaho,
was a visitor at his home Sunday.

I 4- i 4- I 4' I -W- l 4- I 4- M 4 4 4- I 4 I4I4I -
SPRINGFIELD ;
1 4 d 4 d 4 d 4- I 4- 1 4- M4141 4' 14 - 1 4- l "!
A. J. Snyder attended the farm
bureau meeting in Blackfoot Satur
day.
Mrs. Henry Berg has as guests
this week her sister Mrs. Boles, her
sister's mother-in-law and Miss Re&h
Wells.
V. I. Welshon returned to Spring
field last week.
H. K. Wiley attended the farm
bureau meeting in ' Blackfoot Satur
day, leaving Blackfoot Sunday for
the see dshow at Twin Falla From
there he v^l go to Boise for a few
months visit.
R. R. Davis and family were In
Blackfoot on business Saturday.
The A. J. Snyder family drove to
Twin Falls Sunday In their car and
will spend the week attending the
joint conference held there.
The community was deeply grieved
to learn of the death of Kisth Nel
son of Sterling. The father John
Nelson and a younger brother Park,
are very low with the Influenza. Jo'in
Nelson Is one of the earliest settlers
in this country and Kieth was well
known thruout the valley. Many
friends extend their sympathy to the
bereaved family.
Don Shelman, Fred Baired, L.
Shelman, Bruce Parmalee, Hosa
Berg, Hugh Wells, and Henry Berg
were Blackfoot visitors Saturday.
Virgil Stephens and Jack Chandler
spent Saturday and Sunday In Black
foot.
Mrs. W .E. Wells visited Friday
with Mrs. Don Shelman.
Hosa Berg, Bruce Parmalee and
Mr. and Mrs. L. Shelman drove to
American Falls Monday and took the
train to Twin Falls, where they will
attend the joint conference of seed,
beet and stock growers.

C. B. Wilson, from the University
Idaho, spoke at the chapel period
Friday. He expressed much pleasure
the arrangements that have been
made for th vocational training of
students at our high school.
2 STERLING 1
t
Miss Nazzie Bowling and Miss
Rosa Hale came down on Saturday
to take up their duties as teachers.
Miss Hazel Quigley and Marie Ver
bick of Grandview have been assist
ing at the H. R. Chappie home this
week.
The Greenwood family are 11 with
the flu.
Charles Thompson and family are
all ill with the flu.
The sheriff came down Friday and
ordered all influenza cases quaran
tined. Ezra Wheeler was busy Sat
urday and Sunday quarantining all
the new cases.
Mrs. Ed Chappell of Pocatello is
here nursing the H. R. Chappel
family, who are 111 with the flu.
Miss Fannie Verbick has gone to
Pocatello, where she will remain In
definitely.
R.| S. Toland of Aberdeen motored
thru here Monday on his way to
Blackfoot.
Miss Zelpha Bowling came down
Monday to resume her duties as
teacher as Grandview.
Frank Herr is ill with the flu, but
is getting along nicely.
Mr. and Mrs. John Nelson and two
sonB are ill with the flu, Mrs. Nelson
is much improved, but Mr. Nelson
and the boys are very seriously ill.
A trained nurse from Pocatello is in
attendance.
Dr. Flatrle of Blackfoot has been a
frequent visitor here this week ott
professional business.
Carlos Partridge of Blackfoot is
visiting his family.
H. R. Chappell is very seriously
111 with the flu and is not improving
as fast as his friends would like to.
see him. Mrs. Chappel and Lee are
convalesing.
The Patten family are ill with the
flu. Liia is very seriously 111.
Alvin Partridge was on the sick
list the first of the week.
Pete and Tony Parsons made a
business trip to Blackfoot this week.
School began Monday with a very
small attendance.
Mr. Morgan, who is staying at the
Hunt ranch this winter, received the
sad news of the death of his mother
at American Falls on Sunday.
The John Grouch family are re
ported 111 with the flu.
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Tanner are
visiting relatives at Ogden.
h^rs. W. R. Leach and children
and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Nelder
made a business trip to Blackfoot the
first of the week.
4
New German Drying Process.
The so-called Krayseska method, a
new means of drying eggs, fruit juice
and blood, has been demonstrated be
fore the food authorities ln Berlin and
found worth exploiting to a large ex
tent. The drying Is done ln a large
Iron cylinder five meters In diameter,
ln which a pair of Mg metal wings are
quickly rotating, driven by a steam
turbine. The fluid Is lashed to foam
and dried by the aldYtf a hot current
of air that Is continually passed
through the cylinder. The dried prod
uct Is ln the form of a powder, which
will keep for a long time and can be
most economically transported. The
dried products go through no chemical
process and are directly soluble In wa
ter. Drying plants of this type for
treating about 140,000 eggs a day will
be erected shortly In Berlin and
Bucharest.
It
to
ln
out
her
War's Far-Flung Ruins.
Russian churches in Alaska have
hard times making both ends meet
since war's turmoil ln Russia stopped
the payment of money by the mother
church toward the upkeep of these fari
away parishes. All the churches In
that section are now being supported
solely by their small congregations.
Many of the churches contain valuable
paintings and jeweled robes.
In order to eke out his salary, one
member of the Russian clergy, Father
P. Kashevaroff, arch priest ln
charge of the Russian church at
Juneau, took the post of Inspector of
customs at Hidden Inlet, near then,
for the summer.
Mastering English Words
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FRENCH FACTORY GIRLS L.£AIHM<5
CONDUCTED BY THE Y.W.C.A
USH IN A CLASS
FOYERS IN FRANCE.:
Four departments of the French
Government have asked the American
T. W. C. A. to open social and recrea
tion centers for girls employed by
them—Finance, Commerce, War and
Labor.
Lieutenant Poncet of the Minlatry
of Labor recently requested that this
Y. W. C. A. work be begun for girls In
hla offices after seeing the social and
recreation centers which had been
opened at the request of the Ministry
of War. Sixteen centers of this kind
are operated In six cities .In France.
Three of them are In Paris.
The last of these Foyers des Alllees
is for girls who are working In the De
partment of Labor. It is far down the
Seine, under the shadow of the Eiffel
Tower, and ovgplooks the Qual d'Orsay.
are bright and cheerful,
hangings and cushions,
comfortable chairs, reading and writ
ing tables and a fireplace. A kitchen
has equipment so that girls can pre
pare meals for themselves. They go
to the foyer for their two hour lunch
eon time, for social evenings and for
classes In English.
The
with chlnl
400,000 YANKS ARE
Y. W. C. A. VISITORS
Four hundred thousand persons and
more served In the cafeteria in one
year is the record of the Y. W. C. A.
Hostess House at Camp Lewis, Amer
ican Lake, Wash.
The majority of the 490,000 diners
were mothers, wives, sweethearts and
friends who went to the camp to visit
their soldiers. The remainder were
soldiers themselves who broke the mo
notony of "chow" with home cooked
meals. In addition to all these guests,
25.000 little children were cared for In
the nursery and the rest room served
70.000 tired wives and mothers.
The workers at the Information
desk received and, answered 97,000
questions varying from how to get the
best connections to a destination clear
across the continent, the rates of sol
diers' Insurance and the kind of cre
tonne a girl bride should have In her
living room now that Private John Is
coming home from France. Eleven
thousand of these queries required tel
ephone conversations with various
company commanders relative to hunt
ing up a soldier whose parents had ar
rived unexpectedly.
Y. W. C. A. CAFETERIA
IN PORTO RICO
Porto Rico has a cafeteria. It is the
first one established on the rsland, and
when It was opened in the Y. W. C. A.
Hostess House at Camp Las Casas the
natives crowded aronnd, much amused
at the Innovation. They Insisted upon
having American dishes.
The house became very well known
In a short time, and a group of women
from San Jnan volunteered to go out
every week to mend socks and sew on
buttons for the soldiers.
RUSSIAN PRINCESSES
LEARN TO TRIM HATS
to
for
ago
vis
Y. W. C. A. Saves Wife of General
From Becoming Charwoman.
When the war work of the Y. W. C.
A. ln Russia has all been told one of
the most Interesting stories will He ln
the establishment of the first Women's
Co-operative Association at Moscow.
There day after day princesses work
side by side with peasant girls, wives
of high Russian officials make dresses
or trim hats at long tables with simple,
unlettered women, and the money Is
used for self support of these prin
cesses and notable women as well as
for the peasant classes.
The need and suffering throughout
all Russia was so great at the time
tbe Association was established that
was a problem to find where the
money would help the greatest num
ber of people. It was thought best to
expend It to help capitalize organiza
tions for giving work and permanent
opportunities to families and Individu
als to earn their own living.
The women bring their handiwork
the Association for sale or take or
ders to do dressmaking, millinery, etc.,
the rooms of the society or at horn#.
Suitable work was found just ln time
not long ago to keep the wife of one of
Russia's greatest generals from going
as a charwoman to earn broad for
husband, who was ill
*
*
*
w I must express to you the ★
n very great satisfaction and most ★
★ sincere gratitude of the French ★
" Government for the service ren- ★
A dered to the women working In *
" Government factories through *
★ the establishment of Y. W. C. A. A
A Foyers des Alliees (clubrooms A
A for munitionttea).
A These foyers have been an ex- A
A cellent means for bettering the A
A physical conditions and the mo- A
A rale of our workers. They have A
A been constantly used by the wo- A
A men workers, who have found A
A there new elements of dignity A
A and social education.
A I must thank you for bringing *
A this to pass, and I hope that A
A T. W. C. A. work will not dlsap- A
A pear with the war, but will be A
A carried on In order to develop A
A the principles of social solldar- A
A lty which it has Inspired.
A (Signed)
A Minister of Arms and Muni- A
A tions Manufacture.
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA>AA*
★★★★★★★★★A********

* MESSAGE TO Y.W.C. A. FROM A
FRANCE.
A

*
*
^
^
^
^
NIJRSFR ppnm rrv «/»»
mjiots PRODUCE WILD
WEST PICTURE SHOW
M. LOUCHER,

_ ...
ranee without cameras, scenery or
any of the necessary properties, ac-1
cording to reports reaching the Na
Entertain Roumanian Countses at
American Show In France.
Picture shows are being put on in
tlonal Y. W. C. A. from a Y. W. C. A.
nurses' hut In a Base Hospital
Having no film or camera, the
nurses at Base decided to put on a,
living picture show and Invited t
*

Conntoiu « ,i
* L Rouman,a '
rondmnn-m rn r g *° ^ 0n
conditions In the German courts at the
<» «»
preclatlve^f all the aneati
P an the guests. j
_ "
INSIGNIA, CURTAINS,
MADE FROM SKIRTS
i
cur -1
tains are after war economies of the
nine Y. W. C. A. secretaries in Arch-1
angel, Russia.
group.of nurses from a nearby hos
pital to be the audience. It was a
real thriller, one of the wild and wool
ly west variety, with bucking bron
choes and wild rides on broom and
mop horses.
Imagination supplied the scenery,
with the exception of placards, which
announced "the sun'' when It was sup
posed to be shining or "cacti" when
the cowr punchers rode across the
desert
Blue broadcloth skirts used for
ganizatlon Insignia and plaid summer
dresses reconstructed Into window
or
These secretaries have Just succeed-1
ed, In the face of food and cloth short
ages, in opening a Y. W. C. A. Hostess
House for American troops stationed
In Archangel, a town behind the allied
lines. It was necessary to hunt up a
voile summer dress which one of the
secretaries had discarded for heavy
winter clothes In order to have cur
tains at the windows. They Uve on
regulation army rations. .
Archangel Is the fourth dty In Bus
sla where the Y. W. C. A. has estab
Hshed work. Centers were opened
first In Petrograd and Moscow and I
then ln Samara, 900 miles eastward
from Moscow.
Miss Elizabeth Boles, head of Bos
slan work and one of the few Ameri
cans who remained in that country
throughout the revolution, is en route
to America by way of England to ra
cruit workers for Russia. I
- . _ „
A second Y. W. C. A. Hostess House,
for wives and children of soldiers, Is
soon o be opened at Castner, Calm,
Hawaiian Islands, to care for the over
low of women and children from the I i
first house, which opened some months
ago in answer to a call from the com
««<*, of ,h.
During 111 days In Novemta 2.11B
vis tors were entertained at the house,
Including women and children, of the
following nationalities; Philippine, Ha- it
wallan. Portuguese. Spanish. Bu^aa,
Porto Rican, Korean, Japanese and
Amerlcan ' ... ....
f. W. C. A. WOEKER
IS IK SISTER
Industrial Woman's Service Club
Brings Home to Girls in New
# Factory Community.
BLUE TRIANGLE MEANS CHEER
Club Stands for Hot Lunches, Clean
Towels, Comfortable Cots, Parties,
Games and Recreation to
Girl Worker*.
Katherlno Holland Brown.
Y name Is May Isabel Carna
han. I am eighteen years
old, and I work In a big fac
tory In l^lchlgan. More than four
hundred other glrjq work there too.
I don't aim to tell yon about our Jobs.
You can read about our work In the
labor department reports. But I do
aim to tell you about our Big Slater
and of the things she has done for us.
"To begin with, our factory town
Isn't a town at all It's a huge bam
of buildings stuck down In the country
nineteen miles from nowhere. There
I Is a railroad siding, a station the size
of a dry goods box, seven farmhouses
and one general store and postoffice
I combined—It'spretty near as big as a
hot tamale stand. And that's all. No
Main street, no banks nor stores, no
Ice-cream parlors, not one solitary
I movie show, tn all those nineteen
miles. Lonesome? It's the ragged
edge of desolation, that's what it is.
M
"I was one of the first carload of
forty girls that was shipped up from
I Chicago. The factory was swarming
with workmen putting in the machin
ery, and we girls couldn't begin work
for a day or so, so we began hunting
places to eat and sleep. That was a
trifle that the employment folks hadn't
thought of. The workmen were sleep
ing and eating in the cars that had
I brought them there, backed on the
siding. Our only chance for beds and
food was with those seven farmhouses,
so we marched straight to the farmers'
wives and asked for board and room.
Farmers' Wives Hospitable.
I "I will say that thosewomen were kind
and hospitable. They fixed it up be
tween them to fled us forty'girls, and
I they gave us good food too. But for
I rooms, that was the question. They
could each spare one room. That
meant sleep five or six In a room. But
r, « ht then alon * cam * the boss of the
factory and told us the machinery was
ready and he'd expect ue girls to work
double shifts, night and day.
"He' wanted to make use of every
minute, you see. But that gave us our
chance as to sleeping. We fixed It up
with the farm folks that we'd work
double shifts and sleep double shifts
too.
So we planned It Three girls
would use a room from eight at night
hust,e over t0 the factory, and the
three girls who'd been working all
till six the next morning. Then they'd
, .. . .
"ft ^ take the room and sleep
till afternoon. It wasn t any luxuri
ous slumber, believe me. The farm
women had so few sheets and pillow
cases that most of us went without.
And towels were scarce as diamonds
on blackberry bushes. As to soap—
well, the general store kept yellow bar
soap, that kind that is so full of rosin
you could use It to calk a ship. But
we made out till the next three car
loads of girls came rolling In. Then
we went 'most distracted. Those poor
8 lrls had to sleep In tents and In the
Cars that the workmen bad abandoned
b ? this time, and they were lucky If
they got a straw tick and a hi„nLf
J»» know what lata
tumn n jg|j t8 ln Michigan feel like. To
cap the climax the farm folks cut
down on food, and for a week It
p° tttt0es ttnd beans and mighty few
beans at tj, at
Along Came a Miracle. ^
"But, right when we were about
ready to quit our Jobs and beat It for
home, along came a miracle.
quiet, businesslike women climbed
down from the eastbound train
was
Two
one
morning. With them came eight work
men « a carload of scantling and tar
P a P er > another carload of cots and
blankets and pillows ami sheets and
t0 "*V b, ? n '! ne " blankets and beds
—think of the gloFy of that!—and
bushels of dishes and rolls of oilcloth
and enough burlap to carpet the coun
try. You won't believe me when I tell
you that in ten days their workmen
had a scantling-and-tar-paper shack
put up and burlap tacked over the
„ . „
W '. A ' se<!retar y
h er helper had set up board tables
d k ! tt 1 | e ! ® nd were 8ervln K
m°! every day -
° d ba ?* behind the burlap screens '
were set those rows of clean cots, with
, keep yon warra *>»
de . st " ,gh * tha ^ ever blew, and a
t0Wel ap *f ce Jp r eVery single girl. Do
To"™* We aU felt - as on «
F , put lt '. J 1 wa S er tbe Frltz-Carle
noth ng on th,s
Who were those women? Why,
W. C. A. secretaries, of course tm
think you'd know that without belmr
told. All over the country wheSler
we girls have pitched in to make aerm
plane cloth or overalls or munitions or
nnned goods you'll find a Y W C a
secretary wortring harder than '
body else to make the girls
on. and ,o tap .L" h.pp!,
Sotueilmes they haven't money enoun-h
get all that we really need Bm
ways they stretch every cent to loi
do its level best for ub Dolwf
der that we girl workm hav e °ea*?
call the Y. W. C A our Riir qi.
~the very best Big Sister of all?
«ri
er

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