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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, February 07, 1919, Image 5

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CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
_ Advertisements under
this head will be charged (or at the
rate of 10 cents per line each isaue.
The Republican will not be re
sponsible (or more than one Inser
tion (or errors In classified adver
tisements.
RATES:
WANTED
MRS. BYRD TREGO WOULD LIKE
to get in tcuich with good willow
workers, material for work fur
nished. Phone 22 or call at Sage
hurst.
tf.
THERE ARE SOME PEOPLE WHO
would like to communicate with
the "Goose and Sausague Lady"
with her permission.
Appreciation, Republican Office, tf
Address,
OFFICE WORK BY' SOLDIER;
good on typewriter. Harry V. Jor
adv. 2 7 tf.
dan. Phone 407J5.
FOR HALE—Miscellaneous
HEATING STOVES, ONE LARGE,
one medium sized heater for sale
at the Republican office.
tf.
TWO HUNDRED OF OLD EWES, TO
lamb In April, all in good shape
with good teeth, no broken
mouths. Andrus ft Son. Firth,
27a- tf.
Ida.
S. C. BROWN LEGHORN COCH
rels, $2.00, phone 321 after 6
o'clock.
30mf tf
IRRIGATED LAND FOR SALE 120
acres with improvements, 100
acres pasture adjoining, $13,00.
Easy terms. Sheppard & Co.
Idaho Falls.
30-1
TEAM OF GOOD YOUNG WORK
Enquire
adv. Ip
jiorses, weight 1400.
Brick barn, phone 352.
FOUND
SMALL COIN PURSE. OWNfcR
prove property at Republican of
24tf
flee.
LOST
JANUARY 20, BAG CONTAINING
lady's and child's clothing; first
lane south of Firth between rail
road track nad Sand creek.
L. Jones, Pocatello, Route. 1
adv. 29-3p
J.
RED STEER, YEARLING PAST,
branded X on left shoulder and
C. W. on left ribs. Disappeared
from the George Marshall place
at Wapello about Christmas.
Charles Weeding, Blackfoot, R. 2
phone 422J11.
30-2mfp.
BAY FILLY BRANDED LAZY E ON
right shoulder, reward leading to
recovery. W. T. Hyde, R. F. D. 3.
30-4mfp.
WILL SELL OR EXCHANGE
WILL SELL OR EXCHANGE FOR
good young cows, mixed cattle or
ewes, one 8-16 Happy Farmer
tractor used less than two weeks,
/ In good shape as new. Good work
horses, single or in teams, mares
and hores of excellent grade stock.
Inquire of Allred Brothers, Black
foot, Idaho. P. O. Box 541. 29-4p
WANTS TO LEASE
WANTED TO LEASE SEVERAL
thousand acres first class culti
vated land with good water rights
for three or five years, leasing be
ginning 1919 and 1920. Large
tracts preferred. U. S. Beet Seed
Co., Idaho Falls, Idaho.
29-9
FOR RENT
LARGE ROOM SUITABLE FOR
light housekeeping.
Idaho St.
- 9 --
* LOCAL NEWS
537 East
29a-3mfp
!
i
adv 166tf
Life insurance. Beebe.
Mrs. Caples of- Salmon,- Idaho is
the guest of Miss Nell Crenshaw.
W. M. Miles spent the week-end
visiting in Pocatello.
Mrs. Wardell Clinger of Firth was
a business visitor here Tuesday.
Mrs. E. Quinn of Firth was in
town Tuesday.
L. R. Thomas spent Monday in Po
catello on professional business.
John L. Reynolds of Malad was
here on business Wednesday.
Albert Thomas of Malad was a
business visitor here Wednesday.
of
Mr. and Mre. M. B. Watson visited
in Pocatello Monday. ,
PEOPLE ARE COMING TO THIS
GREAT "VICTORY" SHOE SALE
ON THE RUN
And when you get here and see the values we are offering you will
wonder why you waited so long.
BE IN SURE SATURDAY
BEACHY SHOE CO.
Eccles Hotel Bldg.
J. T. Carruth was a Pocatello vis
itor Tuesday.
Patriotic stationery, 75 cent val
ues (or 49 cents at the Hayes Gift
adv.
Dr. and Mrs. M. B. Wheeler spent
the first of the week in Pocatello.
Thomas K. Gunnell of Alexander
was a business visitor here Monday.
John Beguin and wife were down
from Rigby Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Lot Hess were down
from Goshen Tuesday.
L. B. Dustin and wife left Tues
day for Salt Lake City.
Roy Clifford of Shelley was a vis
itor here Tuesday.
Miss Lucille Shelman spent Sunday
in Shelley visiting with friends.
Del Hanks of Shelley was a visitor
here Tuesday.
Ralph Adair was a business visitor
at Pocatello Tuesday.
Shop.
F. W. Kiefer left Thursday after
noon for Boise, where he will at
1
tend to some business.
Money to loan on Irrigated farms.
J. H. Early.
Ed Rockwood returned home the
last of the week, from Arco, where
he spent a few days on business.
Hamilton Wright is spending the
week In Roundup, Mont, attending
to business affairs.
Mrs. A. C. McDonald returned Sun
day from Ogden, where she spent a
few days visiting relatives.
adv. tf.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Rose of Dubois
visited friends here the first of 'the
week.
Forrest Kennedy and Merril Boyle
were Idaho Falls visitors over Sun
day.
Walter Daly has accepted a posi
tion In Pocatello and left the last of
the week to take up his new duties.
William Thompson, Jr. of Poca
tello visited friends and relatives
here Saturday.
Patriotic stationery, 75 cent val
ues for 49 cents at the Hayes Gift
adv.
J. L. Brice spent the week-end in
Pocatello, attending to business and
visiting friends.
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Madsen spent
Monday in Pocatello attending to
business.
Mrs. E. E .Rodgers or Firth was
in town Tuesday having her eyes at
tended to.
C. G. Ohlen, who spent a few days
in American Falls visiting, returned
to his home here Tuesday afternoon.
Albert Calkins of Soda Springs was
a business visitor here the first of
the week.
John Coburn of Lava Hot Spring?
was in town Monday attending to
business.
Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Stevens made
a business trip to Pocatello Tues
day afternoon.
Books on tne war at the public
library in the city hall at Blackfoot.
Shop.
tf
Mrs. W. O. Smith was a business
vistior in Pocatello Tuesday between
trains.
Margaret Barney of Rupert, who
has been here on business, returned
to her home Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. Tolmle of Shelley spent last
week in Blackfoot visiting with rela
tives.
Dr. and Mrs. Simmons went to
Pocatello Tuesday afternoon and
spent a short time there.
Miss Bunnell Brown left Wednes
day afternoon for Ogden, where she
will visit relativees .
Patriotic stationery, 75 cent val
ues for 49 cents at the Hayes Gift
adv.
James M. Stanger, Albert Conklin
and Ralph Loomis of Soda Springs
were in town on business the first
of the week. •
N. E. Montgomery went to Salt
Lake City Wednesday afternoon to
spend a few days attending to busi
ness.
Shop.
Howard Stains, who has been visit
ing friends here for a few days re
turned to his home in Pocatello Wed
nesday afternoon.
John G. Brown left the latter part
of the week for Los Angeles, Cal.,
where he expects to remain indefin
itely.
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Fullmer left
Sunday morning for an extended visit
with friends and relatives in Marys
ville, Utah.
Mrs. LaVerne Miller and little
daughter went to Firth Tuesday
afternoon for a visit with her mother
Mrs. Vickery.
a«a:
vis
val
Gift
adv.
vis
H. Chamberlain, who is making
his home at Idaho Falls since the
death of his daughter, attended to
business matters here Tuesday.
Patriotic stationery, 75 cent val
ues for 49 cents at the Hayes Gift
Shop.
Mrs. Joe Robertson and children,
who have been visiting her mother
Mrs. T. P. Clark for a short time, re
turned to their home in Shelley Tues
day afternoon.
J. W. Bitton left Thursday morn
ing for Salt Lake, where he will
spend a short time visiting with his
sons.
at
it
or
to
the
to
the
as
of
are
the
the
with
of
ting
ed
eight
ey
a
The
a
he
if
to
Most
is
8
steer
April,
the
a
sum
the
the
ence
adv.
Mrs. J. C. Wieiand was called to
Dillon the first of the week on ac
count of the death of her sister-in
law Mrs. Bennett.
Joseph E. Davis, who has been
transacting business here this week,
returned to his home In Winsper,
Tuesday evening.
Mrs. M. A. Barney, who has been
a business visitor here for the past
few days returned to her home In
Rupert Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. Philip Aikers, who has been
at- visiting at Aberdeen passed thru
1 Blackfoot Wednesday on her way to
her Pocatello home.
the
the
Mrs. v Bert Harris of Pocatello
oame to Blackfoot Wednesday after
noon to visit with her mother for a
few days.
Lon Cone of the Rowles-Mack
clothing store, has recovered from
his recent illness and is back at his
work.
Percales double fold, 23c; Lons
dale cambric, extra fine 29c; 36 Inch
bleached muslin 14c; Hope muslin
22c, at the Golden Rule Mercantile
company. adv.l
a M rs. p ox of Idaho Falls was
called to Blackfoot Wednesday after
noon on account of the serious ill
ness of her daughter-in-law, Mrs.
Dave France.
H. C. Jackson, who has been visit
ing here for some time left Wednes
day afternoon for Los Angeles, Cal.
While here he was the guest of the
J. A. Carmon family.
James Ry«n of the Golden Rule
Mercantile left Monday morning for
the east on his spring buying trip.
Mr. Ryan expects to be gone about
six weeks.
Mrs. Archibold and little son of
Mackay are spending a few days in
Blackfoot with her mother Mrs. L.
M. Cherry. Mrs. Archibold went to
Pocatello Thursday morning to spend
the day.
Notary Public at Standrod bank.
tf.
'the
of
in
to
of
to
tf
T. B. Jackson of Ainswood, Iowa,
who has been touring California and
other western points, visited for
few days with his brother C. E. Jack
son and family of Blackfoot. He left
Thursday morning for his Iowa
home.
a
-K
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
OF THE NEW SWEDEN
IRRIGATION DISTRICT
At the Close of Business on February
4, 1910.
Assets
The Great Western Canal
system, consisting of
the Great Western and
Porter canals and all
laterals, rights-of-way,
headgates and dams
appertaining thereto,
including decree of
26,000 inches of water
in Snake river .
5000 acre-feet of Jack
son lake storage water 20,000.00
Real estate, other than
rights-of-way .
Personal property, con
sisting of horses, tools,
Implements, hay! grain
lumoer, etc.
Bills receivable, water
rentals, etc.
Due on 1918 assessment,
second payment.
Delinquent on 1918 as
sessment .
Delinquent on 1917 as
sessment .
Bonneville county war
rants ..*..
Cash in treasury, bond
fund ..
Cash in treasury, general
fund .
Cash in treasury, U. S.
contract fund .
$650,000.00
15,000.00
7,000.00
2,780.69
14,098.97
1,229.62
77.65
433.40
8,783.33
15,450.29
1,504.73
4
$736,358.68
Liabilities
Ballance on first bond ls
$ 20,150.00
sue
Ballance on second bond
issue ...
Ballance on U. S. con
tract .
Outstanding warrants, is
sue of 1916 ..;.
Outstanding warrants, is
sue of 1917 .
Oustandlng warrants, is
sue of 1918 .
Net assets .
11 , 100,00
16,000.00
2.00
6.00
1,034.89
688,065.79
$736,065.79
CHARLES E. ANDERSON,
Secretary.
30-lf
RKKF STEER TO BK KINO
OF SNAKE RIVER VALLEY
the
to
val
Gift
re
Tues
will
his
(Continued from page four)
hand at feeding. Last year he fed
about two hundred head and turned
them out with an average gain of
225 pounds per head. With the pres
ent bunch of cattle he anticipates an
average gain of 250 pounds each, due
principally to the beet silage. Mr.
Xeilsen purchased this lot of cattle
in the fall for ten cents a pound. He
has an offer of fourteen and a half
cents on the first of April delivery.
He raises his own hay, his own beet
tops and buys pulp at a nominal sum
at the factory. Figure up his profits
for yourself on the basis of a 250
gain in weight and a 4%c, gain in
price and see if you don't think he
will make about $10,000 during the
winter. We might incidentally men
tion that Mr. Neilsen raised sixty ac
res of beets and that his beet check
from the factory amounted to ten
thousand, seven hundred and forty
dollars. We spell this out for fear
it might thought the printer had
made a mistake in the figures.
Ralph Ladd is a modest farmer
about a mile north of the Nielsen
ranch and he is feeding but 27 head,
or a car load. He has a good shelter,
keeps the feed lot well bedded down
with straw and the cattle show the
result of extra care. They look fine
and are taking on weight rapidly.
As the party rounded the corner
headed in the direction of Iona, they
passed the ranch of T. C. Barlow,
where a vigorous looking bunch of
lambs are being fed. In fact there
were sheep being fed all along the
route of travel.
A. J. Stanger is feeding a bunch of
steers numbering 152 at the old Iona
Sheep Company's feeding sheds. The
cattle take to the shelter and their
condition indicates that they are be
ing well cared for. Hay and pulp
are being fed here in rations 20
pounds hay to 100 pounds pulp.
George W. Ward is feeding nearly
200 head and we notice that he has
dragged a number of dead trees in
to the feed lot and cattle seem to take
great delight in scratching against
the branches. They are in superb
condition so say the experts, and are
making money for their owner with
every day's feeding.
George Steele's ranch was another
place visited where about a hun
dred head were being fattened. Mr.
Steele has a number of cows and
young stock and he seems to be
growing into the business. Pulp and
hay are the rations here.
The next drive was made to the
ranch of John Nielsen where a
mighty pretty bunch of a hundred
head, mostly all Herefords, or white
faces as they are called by stockmen
were looked o\pr and discussed as
to their merits in comparison with
the other herds visited. Some of
these cattle looked about as broad
as they were long and the place
along the back where the high price
cuts of beef ought to congfegate,
showed a full attendance.
Last summer there was a move
ment started which had for its pur
pose the encouraging of the feeding
of more cattle in this county. The
feeding of the herds above mentioned
are some of the results of that move
ment. Interested were a number of
farmers, business men, bankers and
the factory itself. A. J. Stanger was
selected to see what he could do in
the way of bringing the cattle torihe
farmer. Mr. Stanger got in touch
with the Hansen Packing company
of Butte and they loaned the farmers
22,000 head of cattle tofeed, distribu
ting them in lots of a carload at a
place. The packing company weigh
ed the cattle up to the farmers at
eight cents a pound, though no mon
ey was paid, the eight cents being
a working basis upon which to start.
The agreement was this:
farmer fed the stock till the first of
February he was to receive 9% cents
a pound; if fed till the first of March
he was to receive 10 cents a pound;
if till the first of April 11 cents a
pound, or a three cent spread. As an
example:
Suppose a steer when turned over
to the farmer weighed 1000 pounds.
Most of them weighed less but that
is an easy sum to figure from. At
8 cents a pound the value of the
steer would be reckoned at $80. Sup
posing be has fed till the first of
April, had gained in weight 250
pounds, he would be turned back to
the packing company a 1250 steer at
a price of 11 cents a pound, or the
sum of $137.50. Taking the price of
the steer to begin with, $80, from
the sum he was turned back to the
company, $137.50 and you have a
difference of $57.50. This differ
ence represents the amount oT mon
ey the farmer gets for feeding the
steer a hundred days or a little over.
There's lots of money in it and
the time is fast approaching when
the winter feeding of cattle and
sheep will be one of the big indus
tries of this country, because the
conditions are here that will bring
it about.
adv.
to
ac
been
been
past
In
been
thru
to
a
his
Inch
was
ill
Mrs.
Cal.
the
for
of
in
L.
to
be
of
tf
and
left
a
is,
a
be
'not
of
ing
and
ered,
rates
ian
sion,
crop
from
ed
of
food
crop
tional
If the
Jess
tained
ant
served
and
George
Davis,
Miss
FORMER BLACK.
Mayo
chester,
ceive
trouble
He
Mrs.
Is
foot girl called
Word Was received here the first
of the week of the death of Margaret
Bennett at her home In Dillon, Mont
Sunday morning, Feb. 2, following
an attack of Influenza.
Mrs. Bennet was Margaret Wleand
before her marriage and spent most
her life here with Jter parents in
west Blackfoot. She is survived by
her husband, a little daughter three
years old, father, several sisters and
brothers,one brother who Is In
France.
of
been
W.
weeks
Lake
%
i
e
are you going
to neglect your opport
unity of buying one of
those high grade $25.00
overcoats for
/•
H
• /
■>
</i
-VIA (i
2
$ 195 ?
new coloring—new pat
terns—snappy styles for
young men as well as
<4
I 11
i
\w
conservative styles for
the older
man—in plain
grays and browns.
Very complete run of
I*.
sizes.
f^owUs
Good Clothes
M ac
O.
The
their
be
pulp
20
has
in
take
are
with
hun
Mr.
and
be
and
the
a
white
as
with
of
place
price
pur
The
of
and
was
in
a
at
of
a
an
At
of
to
at
of
a
i
Price of Wheat
to be Kept Up
Chief of Grain Corporation Says
Agency Has No Intention of
Selling Below Quotation
of the Government.
NEW YORK.—Julius Barnes, pres
ident of tWe food administration
grain corporation assured flour
dealers and millers, in a statement
here Wednesday that there would
be no impairment during the present
crop year of the flour prices, de
pendent upon the guaranteed prices
of wheat. He said the grain corpor
ation had no intention of reselling
below the standard buying price the
stocks of wheat which it had accu
mulated.
a
Mr. Bafnes, who returned Tues
day after two months ibroa 1 in llte
party of Federal Food Administra
tor Hoover, said that reports Ivui I
reached him of apprehension on Ihc |
part of millers, Hour dealers and
bankers that the government might
resell the wheal taken from the
grower under the guaranteed bas
is, $2.26 a bushel at Chicago—at a
lower price level, thus resulting in
a decline in flour prices.
of
t
I
America Holds Market.
The basis on which this feeling
existed, said Mr. Bnrnes, seemed lo
be an impression that the world
price level of wheat, as at present
ruling, was below the guaranteed
price basis effective in America.
Broadly speaking, he addJd, this was
'not true. The world buyers, priv
ileged to seek the cheapest sources
of supply, he said, were still com
ing to America to purchase wheat
and flour, because ocean transpor
tation and other conditions consid
ered, the American price was still
more attractive to them than the
rates in the Argentine and Ausral
ian markets.
Contrary to the general impres
sion, Mr. Barnes stated, a careful
survey of the probable demand
which would fall upon the United
States during the walance of the
crop year—from allied countries,
from neutrals, from newly liberat
ed peoples, and possibly as a result
of an imperative necessity for some
food provisioning of Germany in the
interest of maintaining a stable gov
ernment for our own protection*—
indicated an exhaustion of the 1918
crop surplus.
Under these conditions the grain
administrator said, it would be the
height of folly to dispose of the Am
erican surplus at a loss to the na
tional treasury.
the
ing

ENTERTAINED AT "500"
Saturday evening Mr. and Mrs.
Jess Whitcomb delightfully enter
tained at "500", after a very pleas
ant evening dainty refreshments wero
served to the following guests: Mr.
and Mrs. A. D. Bellamy, Mr. and Mrs.
George Butler, Mr. and Mrs. Walker
Davis, Dr. and Mrs. Bernhlsel and
Miss Williams.
TO MAYO BROTHERS
Baxter Hopkins left Sunday for
Mayo Brothers' hospital at Ro
chester, Minn., where he will re
ceive medical attention for stomach
trouble which has bothered him con
siderable of late .
He was accompanied by his sister
Mrs. Margaret Hopkins and the stay
Is indefinite.

Mrs. A. W. McArthur, who has
been the guest of her sister Mrs. P.
W. Powers and family for several
weeks returned to her home in Salt
Lake City Monday morning.
L.
I
STERLING FAMILIES NOTED
The Sterling community is fast
winning an enviable place in the ag
ricultural world .especially In the
production of Grimm's alfalfa seed.
Many of the farmers in that locality
have carried off prizes various years
for the excellent quality of seed pro
duced.
At the Twin Falls convention held
recently, F. W. Strochein won first
prize on Grimm's alfalfa seed pro
duced at his farm and Mark Col
burn's sweet clover seed won first
place also. These genltemen, along
with others, operate spendid seed
frms at Sterling.
Says
flour
de
the

FORMER BLACKFOOT
FAMILY PROSPERING!
Mrs. Ed Lindsay of Fort Hall waa
In town Wednesday morning doing
some shopping.
It will be remembered that the
Lindsay and Bert Gay famlllees were
for a time progressive farmers In the
Blackfoot district, but about two
years ago moved to Fort Hal.
Mrs. Lindsay says things are go
ing very nicely with them now and
that they seem to be on the right
road to prosperity. Mr. Lindsay and
a son are employed by the railroad
attending to pumping
llte
Ivui I company,
Ihc | Plants,
and
the
bas
a
in
TO VISIT PARENTS
Geeorge Worden took his annual
trip to Boise to see his parents. He
said he had developed a little case
of homesickness and was going down '
there to put his feet under father's
table and eat some of mother's cook-
ing.
- • -
t *»I ♦ I ♦ W 'ft 1 ♦ I l ft- l . »H >. l . »I .». l »
I MARKET REPORT |
Retail Market
lo
Eggs .
Butter, ranch .
Lard .
Cabbage .
Bermuda onions .
Free Sliver flour, per cwt
Yellowstone Special .
Mustang .
Ham .
Bacon .
Chickens, dresed .
.40
.40
.30
.05
.06
5.30
5.50
5.60
.45
.60
.25
Wholesale Market
Oats.
Barley .
Hard wheat
Soft wheat .
Potatoes .
Coal at bln:
Lump.
Nut .
.2.20 and 2.30
2.29
.3.10 3.1fi
.3.06 3.13
1.00 and 1.19
8.65
8.39
BUCKS FOR SALE
I have sixty-five Hampshire yearl
ing bucks for sale. H. C. C. Rich,
Pingree, Idaho. adv. 15-tf.
YVE TRIED TO
write a Poem
about a C '
TTUICV STEAK- 1
ANDALLThaT I A
^an think or is
-Try one Foiy/j
QOODNESS5AI
$
I
I
cCC
A TEMPTING, JUICY STEAK
Is a poem In itself. The only
way to get the real flavor out
of the subject Is to eat It. Every
steak or chop sold by us lies
up to the fir3t-class reputation
enjoyed by this market. All of
our meats are possessed of the
proper food values.
CENTRAL MEAT MARKET
The Oualitv Shop
L. B: DORE & SONS

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