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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, March 25, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1919-03-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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READ IN THIS ISSUE, OFFERS OF CASH PRIZES, $20, $25, $30, AND $50 FOR IDEAS ABOUT GOOD ROADS IN BINGHAM COUNTY
Stepuhii out
Of&siil Paper of City and County
— mSamtrn— ■ —-— I III n il ——.—.
I
v'ol. XV. No. 36 -A
BLACKFOOT, BINGHAM COUNTY, IDAHO, TUESDAY, MARCH 25 , 1919
$3 a Year
Cmf CAMPAIGN
OPENS IN REVIEW
New Resolves Made Are
Befitting to Great
Future
MEETING WED. EVE.
The time has come when the peo
ple of Blackfoot should awake to the
fact that the town Is going to grow
into a larfe town and then to a city.
The thingB of a village will not suf
fice for fne future. The enjoyment
of the privileges and advantages of
the larger municipality, carry also
the responsibilities that go with it,
and men must rise to the demands of
the times.
How Blackfoot Curbs Its Men
Blackfoot as a village developed
a good many able men, but owing
partly to the environment created
and preserved by its people, most of
them have gone away, and there are
at present only a few men in the
town showing marked ability. It
has been the practice of the towns
people for the most part to discour
age the development of its aspiring
and ambitious young men and to
block the enterprise of able men who
came in. That leaves the town with
a lot of men of just medium ability,
without lofty purposes and without
the large vision that goes with lead
ership and worthy achievement.
Suffered Such Handicap
The town has always had marked
natural advantages, and has pros
pered notwithstanding the yarrow
methods and narrow vision of its
builders. It needs now to think in
larger figures, to plan with broader
purposes and look to a greater fu
ture. It needs to accept the clearer
vision of such leaders as it has, and
in blind faith launch out on broad
principles to prepare for the greater
growth that is coming. It needs to
break up some of its cliques, forget
some of its small circles of activity,
concede that tbe other fellow has
ability and can do something if given
opportunity, and accept promptly the
valuable lessons of co-operation
taught by the world war.
High Fellowship and Low Morality
Blackfoot has a queer mixture of
low morality and high fellowship. Its
fellowship and fraternalism as cul
tivated by its cliques and lodges is
so high that it excuses crime if com
mitted by members of the clique or
lodge or circle of associates. During
the past nine months it has been
proving this by admitting that it
makes a difference who tampers
with the public funds and school
moneys. At this time there is talk
of electing to city office, members of
the school board in the face of their
action of the past few months of
condoning the misappropriation of
school money in their control and
keeping. Blackfoot has such lack
of sterling character that it hasn't
the nerve to say to six men of the
school board, "You have been
weighed in the scales of public trust
and found wanting, and we will let
you take a back seat in the town
meetings. The men who govern this
town must be men of sufficient cour
age to protect the school treasury
even against your friend and daily
associate, and now that you have
been buncoed and indicated that you
approved of the buncoing, we will
leave you off the roster of the city
government till you get well.''
Wipe Out the Past and Awake
The men of Blackfoot haven't the
nerve to say that. The women of
Blackfoot haven't the lofty vision to
encourage their husbands if they
took such a stand. But they can
wake up and take the broader view
and cultivate lofty purposes here
after. This paper will support for
office, the most progressive men that
are nominated, and will be slow to
make a fight on any man by reason
of his lack of courage and progres
siveness in the past, or his weakness
in compromising with wrongs al
ready committed. If the town wants
to start a clean slate, set its star
high and hitch its wagon to a big
leader, we shall rejoice if all the
weak brothers of the old sleepy days
will lend a hand rather than organize
opposition as heretofore.
Town Forced to Grow Now
The growth of Blackfoot is going
to be quickened by the building of
Continue on page eight
Orpheum Theatre
The most talked about actress in the country
Mrs. Charlie Chaplin
in
"WHEN A GIRL LOVES"
A big dramatic romance, rich with thrills and romance. In addition.
Charlie Chaplin
THE CURE"
u
Thrusday Matinee 2.3$
Coming—Charlie Chaplin In "Shoulder Arms'
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BREAKING INTO A BANK TO BUY BONDS
\
Blackfoot business people lined
up in front of the Eccles Hotel and
the Blackfoot City bank to buy
bonds at the hour of the opening of
the third liberty loan last spring.
The cashier (inside) is just unlock
ing the door at 8.59 a. m. to begin
the day's business.
Only two years before that, there
was a row of cottonwood trees along
this front, and some old houses un
• COPY OF
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAM
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO, MARCH 23, 1919
H. C; ALLEN
STATE HIGHWAY ENGINEER
. BOISE, IDAHO
pROPosiaactf^io™^
BINGHAM COUNTY TWELFTH APRIL WILL YOU PROVIDE CORRECT
INFORMATION RELATING TO THE AMOUNT WE WILL RECEIVE IN AC
CORDANCE WITH PROVISIONS OF HOUSE BILL TWO THIRTY EIGHT IF
BINGHAM COUNTY'* COMPLIES AND ALSO AMOUNT WE WILL BE EN
TITLED TO FROM FEDERAL SOURCE. THIS MATTER IS VERY IMPORT
ANT AND IS BEING USED AS A CLUB TO DEFEAT BOND ISSUE WILL
YOU PLEASE ANSWER IMMEDIATELY AND SET US RIGHT SO THAT WE
MAY GIVE CORRECT FIGURES AND THE NECESSARY PUBLICITY TO
OVERCOME OPPOSITION.
' * '
ESAND ROAD BQUB SUBMITTED PEOPLE
F. M. FISHER, CLERK.
PAY—CHARGE
BOISE, Ida., Mar. 22, 1919
F. M. Fisher,
County Auditor,
. Blackfoot, Idaho.
Dear sir:
Replying In the absence of Mr.
Allen to your telegram of today,
under the terms of House Bill No.
238, there are available state funds
for the construction and improve
ment of the Yellowstone Park State
Highway in Bingham county, in the
amount of $25,000. The availablity
of this sum is contingent upon co
operative funds being supplied from
other sources.
If the county and state co-operate,
the law declares that the proportion
of the total cost borne by the county
shall be two-thirds, and by the state,
one-third.
But when the federal aid Is involved
the highway commission has inter
preted the law to authorize it to
make the State's proportion such an
amount as it deems best for the 'In
terest of the state.
Under the terms of the amend
ment... to the federal aid road act
passed by congress since March 1,
a large sum of federal aid is now
available to Idaho. The method of
apportioning this to different sec
tions of the state must be determined
by the commissioner of public work,
who wUl assume the duties of the
present highway commission on
March 31, under the provisions of
the new administration consolida
tion bill which goes into effect upon
that date;
As far as we are aware, the gov
ernor has not yet made this appoint
ment. Therefore the only advice
which the highway engineer is in a
der the trees. There was mud in
the streets and people were wonder
ing if they would feel the burden of
the pavement tax. Some were even
wondering if they would lose their
property thru failure to meet the
taxes.
The trees and old houses van
ished, pavement took the place of
mud, business took the place of lone
liness and men and women full of
hope and pluck and push were stand
ing in line waiting for their turn to
position to give at the present time,
is as follows:
If Bingham county provides $50,
000 it is certain to obtain the $2 5,
000 allotted to it by House Bill 23 8,
and such additional amount, not
exceeding $75,000 as the commis
sioner of public works may recom
mend in conjunction therewith. All
federal post road and, however, must
be used upon a post road, which Is
defined by the bureau of public
roads as follows:
1. Any public road a major por
tion of which is used for the trans
portation of the United States mails
at the time the application for fed
eral aid is made (the "major por
stretch
tion" may consist of a single
of road or several parts'); or
2. Any public road which can, by
reasonable construction or improve
ment in co-operation with the state
authorities be put into such condi
tion as to permit the use thereof for
transporting the United States mails;
or
3. Any public road no part of
which is used for the transportation
of the United States mails at the
time the application for federal aid
is made, provided it is not more than
ten miles in length and forms a con
necting link (cross link) between
two roads used for transporting the
United States malls at the time such
is
One Hundred Dollars
for a Letter
Write a short letter about good roads not more
than 500 words, send it to any newspaper in Bingham
county to be published in some paper before Monday,
April 7.
Purse Divided in Three
The person writing the best article will receive
$50.00; the second best article, $30.00; the third best
article $20.00. Committee to award prizes will be
selected from the Bingham county farm bureau board.
ALEX YOUNIE,
President First National Bank.
C. W. BERRYMAN,
President D. W. Standrod Bank.
J. C. MILLICK,
President Blackfoot City Bank.
\
invest their money in government
bonds.
The only folks who were complain
ing about paving were those who
stood back and let the opportunity
pass when there was a chance to get
Some went around with peti
tions the year after and tried to get
another paving bond issue, but it
was not so easy to get additions after
the maiff work was done and the
it.
workmen gone.
That is the way it is likely to be
4. Any public road no part of
which is used for transporting the
United States mails at the time the
road with the beginning of another
road over both of which the United
States mails are being transported
at the time such application is made.
Under the law of the state, federal
application for federal aid is made,
provided it does not exceed ten miles
in length and connects the end of a
post road aid must be applied on a
state highway.
If Bingham county votes Its bond
issue, the county commissioners will
then be in a position to demand a
large amount of federal aid on such
portions of the state highway in
Bingham county as will come under
the above definition,b ut for the rea
son indicated above, it is not within
our power at this time to make any
promise as to the approximate
amount. We can simply say that
the amount of federal aid cannot ex
ceed the total of the funds provided
by the county, plus the $25,000
available from the state.
Yours very truly,
H. C. ALLEN,
State Highway Engineer.
By C. W. JOSLYN,
Chief Clerk.
adv. 36atf
Continued on page four
after our good roads are built. Peo
ple will be so full of hope and pluck
and push that they will be hurrying
to keep up with the times and to get
their share of prosperity. People
will be going around with petitions
to carry on greater good roads un
dertakings, because they have seen
the advantage demonstrated right in
front of them, and they will begin
to realize that the only mistake we
made was in not going stronger on
the original job.
Special Road Edition
Will be Mailed Soon
Full of Good Material on the Road
Question by Merchants From
all "Over the County
spirited men and firms of this county
and some from the outside, have
hired space in the paper to tell what
they think^of the bond and road en
terprise. Almost every advertise
ment is an editorial expression by
the author, and it will be rich and
original because it is written by the
live men and women of the country
and on a live subject that most peo
ple are anxious about.
The special will be enclosed within
the regular edition and sent to all
subscribers free. The special part
of it will also be sent free to a large
number of citizens of the county
who are interested in having the in
formation it contains.
TO ADVERTISE OUR VALLEY
The Special Road Bond edition
of the Idaho Republican will go to
the public Thursday evening, March
27. It will be different from any
thing we have yet put out. A large
number of the leading, public
It takes over a ton of book paper
to print the edition. It will take
two-cent stamp to carry each of them
to the readers, who are not sub
scribers, and people are requested
to mail copies to their friends in
other states to advertise our valley,!
I for it contains much matter that
i valuable to the home seeker and in
vestor, and some of it is said to
possess a charm for the eastern
reader. You can,be the judge of
that, and if it is worth using to ad
vertise your county, make good use
of it, for It represents an Infinite
amount of work and a big expense
bill shared by -all the. advertisers,
and most of them did It for public
good rather than for their own
good. If you feel like showing your
appreciation and thanks for this gift
when it comes, you can do so by
patronizing the advertisers who
made it possible for us to send
to you.
Seeger-Bundlie's
Cash Prize Message.
\
The Seeger-Bundlie company congratulates the people of
Bingham county on their study of the road and bond ques
tion, and desires to put some sport into the study by mak
ing it worth while financially.
OUR CASH PRIZE
We will give $25.00 in cash to the person who will write
us the best comment on what is published in Trego's special
edition on roads. Tell us in a letter which article or state
ment in the paper impresses you most, and in what respect
it is superior or why it is convincing, or why it impresses
you.
See that the letter reaches us by Saturday night, the fifth
of April. Do not use more than 500 words. Address the
letter to
Seeger-Bundlie Co.
I)
Everybody's Store
Blackfoot
Broadway
A FIFTY-DOLLAR
PRIZE LETTER
Tells of Ways Farmer
Can Easily Pay
Heavier Tax
WINNING LETTER
When the Idaho Republican com
menced work on this special edition,
the Eccles Hotel of Blackfoot thru
the medium of the paper, offered
$50.00 for the best- short letter on
how the farmer can pay his tax
under the ro$d bond more easily
than he has been paying the taxes
using the roads as they have been.
The following letter, written by Mrs.
L. E. Spalding drew the prize:
The object in making good roads
is primarfily to benefit the farmer.
Good roads enable the farmer to
take advantage of the best markets
at the least possible hauling expense,
which fact alone, in this county,
would enable him to pay his road
tax under the bond system more
easily than he can now pay the pres
ent tax with impassable roads, or
with heavy roads which necessitate
the hauling of several loads instead
of one.
The greater the distance his farm
is removed from the market station
the greater benefit he will receive
from road improvement. If he is
located a distance of five miles he
can make but two trips a day over
bad roads, whereas if the roads were
in good condition he could make *3
or more trips, with less fatigue to
his team and less wear to his wagon.
No argument should be necessary to
convince the farmer that he is mak
ing a very material saving in his
marketing expenses, proportionate to
the distance he is removed from,
market, by having good roads.
Anything that would result in ma
terial saving would help him pay
his taxes more tfeadily; therefore
the saving of his teams and vehicles
should be considered.
By having the Toads in condition
to admit of an occasional trip to
town in the off season (when roads
under pj^sent conditions are at their
worst) to give the family and help
recreation, the farmer would keep up
the 'morale'' of the farm, thus in
creasing its earning capacity,
MRS. L. E. SPALDING.
, THE
HOME HOTEL
Ready to serve. Room and
board. Family style. Next
door the Keystone Hotel.
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO
7 %
Seven per cent money on irri
gated farms In Bingham, Butfe
and Ouster counties.
SEE PARKINSON REALTY
ft INVESTMENT CO.
Blackfoot, Idaho

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