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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, April 04, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1919-04-04/ed-1/seq-4/

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Dodge Brothers
BU5INE55 CAR
\
It is looked upon as a special value,
no matter how long it has been in use.
It will pay you to visit us and examine this car.
/
The haulage cost is unusually low
5
BINGHAM MOTOR
COMPANY
North Main St.
Phone 15
n
c.
THE IDAHO REPUBLICAN
SEMI-WEEKLY
Published every Tuesday and Friday
BYRD TREGO, Editor and Proprietor
Entered at the postofflee at Black
loot, ^daho, as second-class matter.
Subscription price - $3.00 per Year
JOHN D, BELL RETURNS
John D. Bell, a former resident of
Centerville who has lived in Boise
for many years, is moving back to
the old neighborhood, and will en
s
DidYouKnow
That to get the best quality of groceries for
the least money, you must be posted on every
change of the market.
In order to make this as easy as possible for
you, we are quoting you some of our latest /
prices eath week in some .of our local papers.
Compare our prices with what you are pay- /
ing and if you find you have been paying
more for these articles you are paying too
much. *
The following are a few of our regular prices:
.$10.40
...$5.90
100 pounds sugar
100 pounds flour ...
Canned milk, par can 15c
. v .7 for $1.00
Log Cabin Syrup ( small
Full
cheese,
per
size)
.25c
pound .
No. 10 bucket lard ...
Large Oottolene .
No. 10 White Cloud .$2.65
Gallon catsup
Swift's Premium hams, per
pound
Swift's Premium bacon, per
pound
Swift's Picnic hams, per
pound
Standard corn, per can 15c
...7 for $1.00
String beans, per can 15c
.7 for $1.00
30c
Log Cabin Syrup (medium
.$2.85
size)
50c
$2.85
10 pound backet dark Karo 00c
10 pound bucket white
Karo
85c
$ 1.00
No. 5 box soda crackers ....70c
E. C. cornflakes .
40c
.-.8 packages for 25c
O pound bag Germande.
0 pound bag Firth pancake
flour ...
1 pound can tall pink sal
mon
1 pound can plum and apple
55c
65c
.80c
65c
20c
jam
25c
Tomatoes, per can 15c.
Campbell's soup
7 for $1.00
2 cans for 25c
s
V
gage in the stock business in com
pany with Bind brothers.
They have been equipping their
farms with buildings and shelter for
handling stock in winter, and feed
ing them on the modern mixtures to
make quick growth, and the pros
pects of good roads and easy means
of transporting pulp and other feeds
makes the matter attractive to Mr.
Bell.
+
W. H. McNab of Incom, Lt. F. S.
Miller and J. T. Hagoer of Poca
tello came up Tuesday to attend R.
A. Parsons' shorthorn sale.
McNab took home a handsome bull
calf at $325.
Mr.
SUGAR CLUB
ORGANIZED
Men of Local Utah
Idaho Sugar Com
pany Form Club
ACT IN~HARMONY
Mr. Carpenter* acted as chairman
of the meeting and called the house
to order. He outlined and explained
the purpose of the organization. The
meeting was then turned over to the
members for a general discussion,
for and against the club. Joseph
Cutler spoke of how other clubs were
doing, and the results thus far ob
tained. A vote was taken to find
out the sentiment of those present,
and it resulted in the unanimous
vote for the club. Mr. Cutler was
called upon to tell bow other clubs
were organized and conducted, which
he willingly did. It was moved and
seconded that Joseph Cutler act as
president of the club, with Ellis Ed
wards as secretary and Claud W.
Munsetter, treasurer. Mr. Carpen
ter then turned the chair over to
Mr. Cutler.
After the election of the presiding
members, an amusement committee
was elected. They were as follows:.
J. L. Harvey Jr., George H, Smith
Jr., H. R. Boice, Harry Holm and J.
E. Kelley.
The name selected to be given the
club was "Can't Beet" sugar club.
Mr. Carpenter oommended the
members on their actions, and waB
thoroly
present and' such a harmonious feel
ing existing among the men.
The following are the members
of the club:
William Varley, Tom W. Norton,
Joseph E. Cutler, J. L. Harvey Jr.,
Ellis Edwards, Fred H. Heese, Oliver
Lindsay, Dorothy Cobbley, Ruth Nel
son, Harry Holm, W. E. VanNoy,
Charles Whitman, Harvey Green
wood, J. R. Brown, H. R. Boice, A.
C. Rumble, Frank Rice, John Ed
wards, Lawrence Jorgensen, W. S.
Rumble, D. F. Splllsbury, Waldemar
Jensen, R. W. Campbell, C. W.
Mussetter, James McDonald, C. M.
Roberts, J. E. Eckersley, George
Obershaw Wayne Mills, Joseph
Mills, L. H. Maxwell, J. E. Kelley,
John Barnard, R. T. Aldous,
Charles Lystrup, A. E. Boulter, A. B.
Carpenter, Eld Peterson, Goldy Jones,
Harry Rumble, Charles Edwards, E.
M. Price, Glen McKellar, V. Baldwin,
Parley Blackburn, Charles Price.
in seeing so many
+
TO FILE TAX DELINQUENCIES
County Attorney R. W. Adair
prepared for filing this week a list
of thirty-five delinquencies for taxes
within the county, and the fore
closure papers have been placed In
the court* house.
IN THE OTY SCHOOL
Better School Facilities
Draw Pupils From
Outside Districts
HARD TCTCOLLECT
The Blackfoot school has had a
series of problems in connection with
the tuition of pupils coming in from
outside the district. Pupils living
just over the line, closer to the
biackfoot schools than to the school
in thejr own district, naturally want
to come to town and it is necessary
for them _to pay a tuition or get the
trustees of their own district to
transfer their portion of the school
money to the Blackfoot district.
There are a good many families
living in town, having relatives in
the Lost river country and other
communities where the school facil
ities are not so good and where the
distance from the school is against
them, and they come to Blackfoot
and live with their relatives and at
tend school here. Some of them
claim Blackfoot as their residence,
but as soon as school is out they
take up their residence at the old
home and continue to live there until
school reopens.
These cases have required a great
deal of investgiation thru all the
years and the collection of tuition
from them has been rather difficult
at times.
A new problem has developed iri"
the last few years with the Indian
children on the reservation who pre
fer to come to the town schools.
There have been about twenty-five
of them and it was arranged that
the federal government should pay
their tuition with the understanding
that they were allowed to remain in
the town schools. The understand
ing with the government was that a
report should be turned ,in to the
Indian agent at Fort Hall every sixty
days showing how many pupils were
in the Blackfoot schools from the
reservation and the government
promised to make payment of the
tuition based on what the report
showed. This matter dragged along
two years without the government
making the payment. To bring the
matter to a focus Blackfoot denied
admittance any longer to these
Indian children and the matter was
taken up with the Indian agent at
Fort Hall and reported that he had
lest all the reports that had been
turned in by the superintendent of
the Blackfoot schools and asked that
duplicates be made out and sent to
him. It seems that duplicates were
not made at the time and now it be
comes necessary for the superinten
dent of the city schools to do all
the work over, involving a great
amount of territory. In the mean
time the Indian children are out of
school, excepting those few families
who have taken up their residence
in Blackfoot.
•F
CURRENT EVENT MEETING
There will be a meeting of the
Current Event club Monday, April
7.

Sunday" We Sent a Telegram
to our Buyer in New York
City Saying
i
Express thirty-six misses' and ladies' dolmans full of color, pep, kick and
style to sell here wfcek-end at popular prices.
U
Seeger-Bundlie
And the Goods Were on the Way Monday P. M.
speeding <to Everybody's Store for happy Shoppers today, tomorrow and Monday.
Our ready to wear trade has been phenomenal this spring, and every buyer of
our goods is a booster for our store. They have all had the advantage of our good
buying and our efficient delivery of goods, of style and colors right
minute. .... '
up to the
Some communities run more to one kind of goods than to others, and
peo
ple who wait to see how certain kinds of goods are taking, are assured that dolmans
are makng a big hit in Bingham county this year. That is why
we are re-ordering
to keep our stock upL to the minute with prices so reasonable that everybody can have
their desires. Goods that used to be shipped hy slow freight in heavy boxes,
come by express packed so light that carrying charges are slight.
Our showing in piece goods is an almost unlimited variety of sheer and finer
fabrics. We have not neglected the staple goods, and we have a splendid assort
ment of romper cloths, ginghams and''percales.
now
/
SPECIAL
SPECIAL
Fifty pieces 28-inch standard
percales lights, darks, 15c yd.
Children's indigo blue play
suits
75c
Seeger-Bundlie Co.
Everybody's Store
««
*•
Broadway
Blackfoot
RUGS
Special Values
9x12 high grade Milton regula*.
values $110 for ..
6x9 regular $60 for
11 1-4x12 Tapestry Brussels reg
ular $35 to $50, special.. .$30 to $40
Large stock of other rugs
$ 75.00
$ 40.00
BED SPREADS
>
/*
A limited lot of high grade large size
fine weave, cut corners regular
value $6.50 for
K
$ 4.95
✓ \
Biethans
%
£
V.
s
SE
The annual election of officers will
be held and all members are re
quested to be present.
After the business meeting the
following program will be given:
Are the children of today acquir
ing a taste for good reading......
.Miss Gellespie
.Mrs. Chester Vincent
Piano solo
Round table, Co-operative buying
a discussion led by Mrs. Jackson
Music, children's songs Mrs. Austin
Hostess Mrs. C. E. Harris.
_ ,
Lucy Fenimore, the thirteen-year
old step-daughter of Jere B. Earley,
who lives north of Blackfoot, be -'
GIRL VICTIM OF INFLUENZA
j tween the two Snake river bridges,
died after an illness of ten days at
her home last Thursday, March 27.
Dr. Patrie, the attending physican,
gave as cause of the child's death,
influenza followed by pneumonia.
The funeral was held Saturday from
the L .D .S. church. *
STOCK SALE TUESDAY
The Parsons stock sale at the
fairgrounds Tuesday witnessed the
sale of about twenty head of young
breeding stock, all registered cattle,
at prices ranging from $200 to $900.
A three-year old bull went at $900
and two-year old bulls and heifers
sold at prices ranging around $400
-' and $500.

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