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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, April 04, 1919, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1919-04-04/ed-1/seq-8/

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Charming Coats
Suits and Dresses
/
These Goods
Are up
to This
Store's
, High
Standard
They're
Typical
of the
Models
i
of
Paris
■J
We point your attention to the goods that are coming in
daily.
They .are quaintly designed from extreme models that re
flect the Victory idea of the French makers. But—it is
a good time to beware of cheap goods. As always "we
have insisted on quality first, because quality is remem
bered long after price is forgotten.
Come in and see the "Virginia Dare" dresses just received.
• '
The Brown-Harl Co.
1

The Home of
Popular
Prices
\
ISK
I
tt
ro
DRESS)
DRESI
LIVESTOCK LOSSES
IN NATIONAL FORESTS
An explanation of why the federal
government is expending funds in
the control of livestock diseases, in
the eradication of poisonous plants
from national forest ranges, and in
the extermination of predatory ani
mals thruout the western states, is
given in some statistics recently
compiled by the Ogden office of the
forest service. Durijig the fiscal
year which ended June 30, 1918,
3,187 cattle and horses, worth $209,
000 and 40,228 sheep, worth $523,
000 were lost thru predatory ani
mals, disease, poisonous plants and
other miscellaneous causes within
the national forests of the inter
mountain district. The fact that this
loss, amounting to three quarters of
a million dollars in a single year oc
curred upon grazing lands which are
admittedly superior to those com
prising the open public ranges, gives
some conception of the hazards at
tending the production of livestock
in the west.
Predatory animals took the heavi
est toll from the range flocks and
herds, killing 273 cattle and horses,
worth $13,650, and 21,813 sheep,
■worth $283,b69. The next most de
structive agency was the poisonous
plant, which killed 2139 cattle and
AFTER THE
FLU
U
If you have had the "flu," you need ad-
justing for after-effects. If you have not
had it, spinal adjustments will keep you
from it. Chiropractic not only
the cause of disease but wards off disease.
- Palmer graduate
removes
Clairbel Sickert
4
Chiropractor
Office phone 400 Residence phone 562
Hopkins Building Broadway
#■
horses, worth $106,950 and 7612
sheep, worth $98,8o6. Disease ac
counted for a loss of 368 cattle and
horses, worth $18,400 and 505 sheep
worth $6565. Miscellaneous causes,
including lightning, floods, bogs,
etc., account for the remaining 1407
cattle and horsed, wQrth $70,350
and 10,298 sheep, worth $133,874.
Lightning was particularly destruc
tive, causing heavy losses due to the
congestion of stock at points struck
by lightning.
+
LENNOX CLUB ENTERTAINS
WITH DANCING AND CARDS
The twelve members of the Len
nox club, recently organized, enter
tained Monday evening with danc
ing and "500" in their rooms on
North Taylor street. The party was
chaperoned by Mrs. W. A. Lee. After
the games refreshments were served
and after the refreshments every
body danced. The evening was a
successful beginning for the club's
affairs.
+
FARM LOANS
On irrigated farm lands; no delay
In getting your money; no commis
sion charged. Call or write Mrs.
Margaret Hopkins, 285 South Uni
versity Ave., Blackfoot, Idaho.
adv. 37a-5m
Many Contestants
. _ ,
Compete tor rnzes
now, when the time
Continued from page one
A Volunteer or a Slacker?
Good road volunteers are many.
Among the foremost are the Eccles
Hotel, the City, National and Stand
rod banks, Seeger-Bundlie's store,
the Bingham county farm bureau
and the Blackfoot papers.
! These volunteers are enlisted to
do their all, and have already opened
their purses to get the people inter
ested in their own business affairs;
to awaken to the opportunity now at
the door.
Mr. Taxpayer put a few dollars
into a good, safe, profit sharing in
vestment which pays dividends daily.
This isn't a "get rich quick"
scheme. You always have the value
for.money invested.
Surely every citizen favors better
roads.
If you haven't given this question
any thought, if you are a tight-wad
and are afraid of the risk, or U you
are a "good roads slacker,, i;ead a
few facts concerning this matter.
Had we failed when called to do
our all when our country was afwar
with Germany the kaiser would now
be at the helm.
Will we fail
is ripe to reap the benefits of good
roads? Namely saving money, in
creased valuation of property, saving
of lives lost yearly thru bad roads,
saving of time and energy of men
and beasts, saving wear and tear on
autos, buggies, wagons and harness,
the pleasure of being able to go any
where in the county with out getting
stuck every few miles, as many have
this spring.
Its sure fun to be an on-looker
when this happens. Ask someone
who has been stuck in the Groveland
streets the name they called it, it
won't sound life "fun."
The greatest benefit is Uncle Sam
wil lhelp us with a generous sack
of coin. It we bond for $50,000 we
will get $25,000 from Uncle Sam and
we can get not to exceed $75,000
providing we send men with plenty
of pull to put in our claim and ex
plain our needs.
Will we let this opportunity pass?
Show your color, when your
chance comes. Vote bonds for good
roads.
Mr. Slacker if you refuse to be
interested now and refuse to work
for the betterment of your town
and county, when there are acci
dents caused by bad roads, say to
yourself I'm to blame for that.
When you see autos, wagons and
buggies broken down or stuck in
the mud for hours, when people re
fuse to make their home in a county
so far* behind the times that peo
ple have to stay home a good part of
the year and when Garfield Bond
loses $1350 and many others large
sums of money yearly by being un
able to get to markets, don't try
to shift the blame on your wife or
neighbor just, say "I am the cause
of this.
Our first duty, vote the bonds.
Second, see that ewery dollar ap
propriated for road improvement is
used on Bingham county highways
and is expended under such close
supervision by taxapyers that waste
and graft be wholly eliminated.
MRS. S. E. ROUNDY,
Blackfoot, R. F. D. 1
1
a
The value of good roads has been
recognized at least since the time
when all roads led to Rome and the
Romans built such good roads that
some are still in use after all these
centuries. Their construction con
tributed largely, If not mainly, to
the wealth and prosperity of the na
tion. So it will be with Bingham
county, when good roads are «»
tablished—wealth and prosperity
will naturally follow. Bad wagon
roads is synonymous with poorest
marketing facilities, and what does
it avail the farmer to produce big
crops if he is unable to convert them
into cash or market them at a pro
fit? The old truism "Time is money"
applies especially to the farmer and
his desire for road improvement for
by saving time in marketing his
crops, he has more time for lucra
tive farming, as well as for recrea
tion for himself and family!
Not the farmer alone, but the
whole community shares in the bene
fits of good roads. This is, preem
inently a community of parents am
bitious for the interests of their
children, and little argument should
be necessary to convince them that
these Interests demand better roads.
Good roads, making the nearby
towns and cities easily accessible at
all seasons, would help to make the
whole community content and pros
perous.
The farsighted man sees beyond
today and builds for the future so
one is forced to the conclusion that
the men whose judgment and fore
sight led them Into this fertile val
ley when it was yet a wilderness, will
see the necessity of good roads and
realize that now is the accepted time
to secure them.
Population m^kes the value of
real property and good roads are
an important factor in attracting
people to a locality and holding
them as permanent settlers. The
growth as well as the prosperity of
our county, demands the construc
tion of better highways and means of
intercommunication.
a
t
a
as
is
at
and
L. E. SPALDING.
Springfield, Idaho April 2, 1919
Living as I do by an ungraded
county road, each day convinces me
more clearly of our need of good
roads.
Each community in the county has
a rural center, to which good roads
would bring additional trade,
crease in trade would keep more
money circulating at home and
nomic, educational and social facil
ities would gradually develop for
our benefit.
The transcient travel thru . our
county Is not to be discounted. News
of our good roads would encourage
new home seekers to try their luck
with us and assist them in winning
their way to success.
A As our county is the home of
■$any sheep men during Bpring and
winter months, we should realize
that our produce would sell to them
at better prices could they curtail
Dr.
tend
day,
the
In
eco
W.
tion
tist
the heavy expense occasioned by
hauling over poor roads. Our own
produce would bring us higher pro
fit thru increased marketing facil
ities and a decrease in loss from de
preciation in the value of machinery
and live stock on poor roads. The
cut in garage bills and the saving of
time on good reads are valuable
items. The wrong of unmarketable
crops when the world needs food,
'.ies often at the door of bad roads.
The county business centers in
the banks at the county seat. Mis
understandings often arise from
business transacted by mall. A good
road, permitting farmers to get in
touch with their bankers thruout
the year would do away with many
delays and losses to depositor and
banker.
Then the explanation of the beaut
ies and resources of our own home
county would be facilitated by good
roads.
Leaving the economic value of
good roads we find the social value
even greater. Good roads would en
rich our lives thru greater social
intercourse with our neighbors. Con.
tact with larger centers would per
mit us to see and hear better eater*
tainments. This would open up new
fields of thought and endeavor by
putting us in touch with the cur
rent of world progress. No individ
ual Is improved without leaving
some mark upon the community.
Inasmuch as isolation breeds narrow,
mindedness and bigotry, contact
the world develops broad-mindedness
and humanitarianlsm. Good roads
lead us to better thoughts, more re
laxation and enjoyment and finally
to better citizenship.
The education of our children is
seriously hindered by poor roads.
Their health is often endangered. To
build good roads Would be to build
a better future for our posterity.
As a country woman I have ap
proached this from a country stand
point, keeping in mind the knowl
edge that what benefits the farmer
benefits the city man in inverse
ratio, for one is dependent upon the
other. Perhaps the best a good road
could do, would be to more closely
relate the lives of the two, develop
sympathy and harmony between
them and obliterate unnecessary and
unjust class prejudices.
MRS. H. V. CHANDLER.
to
at
in
you
a
do
now
in
on
any
it
we
ex
be
to
in
of
or
is
it?
1
Sterling, Idaho, April 1, 19.19
I presume most of the taxpayers
know the benefits to be derived from
a good road,
that do not realize,
would like to quote the following
from my observation. Land values
do no where exist without the good
roads being there. It cost money to
build the Multnomah highway in
Oregon.
The' roads in some parts of Cali
That's
There may be some
For those I
to
at
in
fornia too, were costly,
where you find alfalfa land at $500
per acre. Don't you think our land
is just as good and when really it
comes to hay it would make thetr's
look sick in comparison. What put
Pershing to the front? Wasn't it
good roads and plenty of grit. Im
agine Pershing going to the front by
way of the alkalies near here. That
would be great. I think not, wouldn't
The man who said we have the
land, but we are way behind with
our roads is right, and whatever we
do let us build them and build them
good, as in that way cost of main
tanance will soon make up for the
extra cost of a good road.
I presume we all want to give
Bingham county as well as the state
a place on the map. So let us all
work for good roads, better towns
and communities and a better Idaho.
MRS. L. G. FISHER.
Blackfoot, Idaho, April 2, 1919
Good roads are the greatest as
sets a farming community can have
because they are economical, profit
able, indispensible. They enable the
farmer to deliver at the proper sea
son his products with the minimum
of time and expense with either horse
or motor power and with the least
wear on either.
Tourists and homeseekers con
sider roads with the development of
a country which either encourages
them to stay and invite their friends
t oa good thing or to get out taking
a bad Impression of the community
with them for they usually desire
thrifty looking places.
Good roads increase the value of
the land near it as does a 'paved
street in the city, they induce the
younger folks to seriously consider
the farm as they rely principally on
modern conveniences for their fu
ture and good roads are a modern
convenience which any progressive
community requires,
need less repair than bad ones, such
as we now have, thereby lessening
the taxes.
The state's proposal to help build
good roads is proof enough to con
vince one that we should maintain no
other kind wh$re the traffic is great
est. Not only are the farmers bene
fited, but it makes all industry pay
better. Everyone receives better ser
vice, merchants, bankers, railroads,
lumber, electric and telephone com
panies, in fact the only drawback
is in the building and this Is soon
overcome by the many advantages.
Good roads are as essential to man
at this day and age as was the bow
and arrow to the red man.
MRS. J. V. McKERCHER.
Blackfoot, R. F. D. 1.
Continued in next issue
Good roads
*
MRS, FRANK T. HALVERSON
DIES OF THE INFLUENZA
Mrs. Frank T. Halverson suc
cumbed to an attack of influenza,
lasting one week, at her home at
Riverside on Wednesday, April 2.
Dr. W. W. Beck was called iiwto at
tend to the stricken woman on Sun
day, but it was pot possible to check
the advance-of the disease.
W. O. T. U. WORKER COMING
Emma Drake will address the
ladies of the W. C. T. U. on "Legisla
tion for Righteousness" at the Bap
tist church at 3 o'clock Monday
afternoon.
She will speak at the high school
auditorium Monday evening and
everyone Is cordially Invited.
THEY WANT TO KNOW'
A good many people want to know
what is the use of putting up 9600,
000 for road building, when we have
so little to show for the $74,000 that
was expended last year for roads.
They ask if it is not likely the larger
sum will also be spent and still have
nothing to show for it.
Their point is well taken if it
were the intention to expend this
large sum grading earth roads and
dragging them with all sorts of out
fits in all sorts o^ weather, wet, dry,
dusty or whatever it might be the
day the road man had some teams
he wanted to hire out o nroad work
regardless of whether they would
accomplish any good.
But that is not the plpnf All the
plans for the expenditure of this
bond money contemplate the con
struction of roads with a cfown-with
a wearing surface that will neither
blow away nor wash away, nor yet
soak up and tramp flown flat. We
never yet have had anough money
to go ahead and equip for handling
the materials for crowning roads,
nor have we ever adapted the sys
tem that would get the work done
by the new system. - #
It is as if a merchant were doing.,
business in a tent apd it took his
profits each year to mend the tent
and fight the dust and rain water
that found its way into his goodB.
S 3 might better bond and build a
rmanent shelter for his goods and
stop the loss and waste, and the dam.
age on the goods.
It is as if a man were raising grain
and had not enough money to buy
a binder or header and went ahead
harvesting it with a mower, losing a
large percentage of the crop, and
having it sprout and grow the next
year, where he did not want it, and
yet not have enough of it to make
it profitable to stand back and let
it mature.as volunteer grain,
would simply make a failure of
farming, whereas, he might go in
debt, (bond) for the price of
binder, stop the waste and ""begin
making money.
It is difficult to comprehend this
road bond question because it
into larger sums than most of
are accustomed to deal with, but it
is feasible to build lasting roads, stop
the waste, get better service and
stop the waste and loss on roads,
cars, tires and time.
He
runs
us
*
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the probate court of the County
of Bingham, State of Idaho.
In the matter of the estate of
Oren F .Smith, deceased.
Notice is hereby gi ven by the
undersigned administratix of the
estate of Oren F. Smith, deceased,
to the creditors of and all persons
having claims against, the said de
ceased to. exhibit them, with the
necessary vouchers, within ten
months after the first publication of
this notice, to said administratrix
at the office of George F. Gagan,
room four, Standrod Bank building,
in Blackfoot, Idaho, the same being
the place for the transaction of the
business of said estate.
Dated this thirty-first day of
March, 1919.
. ESSIE M. SMITH,
Administratrix of the Estate of
Oren F. Smith, Deceased.
adv. 38-6f
ANNUAL SCHOOL
The annual meeting of the River
side school district No. 2, will be
held April 21, at 1 o'clock for the
purpose of electing one trustee and
transacting other business that may
properly come before the meeting.
ORVAL YANCEY.
Clerk.
MEETING
38-2p
Registered
Horn
Bulls
At Auction
Saturday, April 12/19
.
Stock Yards, Idaho Falls, Idaho
I will try to sell forty head of registered Short
Horn cattle at 2 o'clock p. m.
These cattle are from the best herds in Iowa,
'anJ are being sold by the noted breeder, C.
A. Saunders. Come and see a grade of stock
that will produce both beef and milk. Reg-~
istered certificate furnished with each animal.
C. A. Saunders
Manilla, Iowa
f
The Charm
of Style
K
r 4» I
that women seek in footwear is
found in the new spring.
V
Oxfords, Pumps and
Shoes
which are waiting your inspection.
There never was a time when foot
wear was a more essential item of
correct apparel than now, so come g
early and be fitted before your size
is gone.
The Brown-Hart
Company
"The Home of Popular Prices"
AUTOMOBILE OWN.
ERS TAKE NOTICE
All automobile and auto trucks
being operated on the highways of
Bingham county after May 1, 1919
without displaying 1919 license num.
her plates will be dealt with accord
ing to law.
E. T. MALCOM,
Assessor Bingham County.
H. A. SIMMONS.
Sheriff Bingham County.
38-2f
*!*
MRS. ANNA E. JACOBSEN
PASSES AWAY AT GROVELAND
Mrs. Anna Evangeline Jacobsen,
who was living with her daughter,
Mrs. Arthur Hale at Groveland died
Sunday, March 30, at the age of
sixty-one years. The body was ship
ped to Logan, Utah for burial. Mrs.
Jacobsen was the mother of
Julius Jacobsen, formerly located in
Blackfoot as state crop estimator.
*
A SPELLING CONTEST
At the university of Minnesota re
cently a spelling test was applied to
ninety students in the normal school.
Professor W. S. Mills, who conducted
the trial, submitted a list of ten
words. The best record was seven of
the ten words spelled correctly.
Next year the niety students who
were given the examination expect
to teach school. Since seven of the
words correctly spelled was the best
mark, it is inferred that many of
the other attempts fell below that.
The words selected were In, no
sense "trick" word|. They were
words in common use, and words
which are foun din almost every
column of every daily newspaper.

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