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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, April 08, 1919, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1919-04-08/ed-1/seq-3/

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PRUES OF FERED TO PRECINCTS IN BINGHAM
YOUNG ONE HONORED PER CENT PURE
Each Precinct Should Organize a Road Bond Club
to Push Their District Over the Top on
Read Bond Election Day"
CHIEF AND HIS CLUB WILL BE REWARDED
Prizes will be given to the pre
cincts that deliver the greatest num
her of votes .for the road bonds and
none against the bonds.
It is suggested that each precinct
organize a Road Bond club, so the
energies of the precinct shall work
as a unit, consisting. if possible of
ten or more members.
lilackfoot Jewelry Company Prize
Prize No. 1. The Blackfoot
Jewelry company of Broadway will
give a large eight-day regulator
clock for use in the school house,
(some school house) in the precinct
that delivers the largest number of
votes for the bond issue and no votes
against the bonds. If there are
two or more schools in the precinct,
then the prize will go to the school
district that delivers the most votes
for the bonds.
r
Idaho Republican Prizes
The Idaho Republican announces
its decision to double the rate of pay
for the rest of teh calendar year to
every news writer supplying us news
from any and all precincts that go
over the top with no votes against
the bonds. A special prize will be
given to the news writers supplying
us with news from the precinct that
delivers the most votes for the bonds
and none against them. This will
consist of triple pay for the rest
of the year. The Republican was the
first newspaper in the county to
adopt a monthly cash payment sys
tem for all country correspondents,
and now we offer double pay and
triple pay as indicated, and writers
that get the. higher pay will find it
doubly profitable to give their com
munities a better news service. If
any person in a precinct puts in a
vote against the bonds, he or she
helps to prevent getting good roads,
and also prevents their community
reporter from getting a raise in pay
for the next nine paydays. Help put
your community on the road map
and also on the news map.
Gem State Laundry Prize
The Gem State Laundry of Broad
VOTE FOR THE BONDS' YOUR
TAXES WILL BE LITTLE OR NO HIGHER
The Higher the Vote the Better the Premium That
Will be Offered by Different Bonding
Firms That Will Make Their Bids
BONDS OR NO BONDS YOU PAY ANYWAY
If the Road Bond Carries
It is hardly worth while to say,
"If the road bond carries," for peo
ple who have been out over the
county and heard expressions every
where report that it will go over
by a good majority, granting that
one or two precincts act on the no
courage impulse and vote against it.
Therefore people may just as well
say, "When the road bonds are ap
proved," and then they can go on
consdering what will follow such ap
proval.
A Big Boost for All
It will not be any news of interest
to the rest of the state to hear
merely that Bingham county ap
proved the bond sale at the polls.
It would be a queer county that
would not do that under all the at
tending circumstances,
is a chance to put a
news into the report,
will be worth something to the
county in establishing its reputation
and credit; something that will be
worth a big block of money right
away at the bond sale, and that, is
to have the election go over by a
majority that will be regarded as
a unanimous vote.
Some Free Advertising
If that shall happen, it will en
title Bingham county to a mention
in the associated press dispatches
of the naton, a thing that money does
not buy, but is worth money. If
that shall happen, it will mean that
But there
element of
one that
i) e
and
JACK
THE
Hatter
THE REAL HATTER
Send us .your old hats.
The Parcel Post Hatters of
Idaho
Pocatello
way assumes that the folks working
In the Road Bond club will get
splashed with some mud and will soil
i their clothes a plenty in looking
after this vote, and Manager W. W.
* Davis, being a good sport, plfers to
I launder their clothes and clean their
i suits to the amount of $10 on the
order of the club.
Three-A Garage Prize
The Three-A Garage of North
Main assumes that these scouts of
the club who go out to smile with all
their voters and arrange with them
to vote for the bonds and do their
country and their precinct a service,
will have a puncture or two and will
need some other repairs on the cars,
and the Three-A will do the repairs
up to $10.00 worth on any jitney or
jitneys the chief of the club says to
repair.
announ< ;?, 8 that $10 worth of admis
8 !°. n ? w , be ab * ie disposal of the
? hief and hls party when they come
t0 ^ n in a body to celeb rate the
100 per ceut pure vote -
Cottage Hotel Offers Prize
Manager Daniels of the Cottage
Hotel says the club must stay over
night in town while celebrating their
victory, and' he will furnish $10
worth of rooms and beds at his fine
hostelry on East Main, 70 North,
Isis Theater Prize
The Isis Theater on West Pacific
street, thru Manager Robert Boyd,
Powers Pharmacy Prize
P. W. Powers of the Powers
Pharmacy of Bridge street, offers a
round of his choice things of the
soda fountain noted for their re
semblance to nectar, the drink
they
come in a body and smile with
them across the marble while they
sit. He is a good sport and will be
glad to listen to short stories of how
they did it.
Please send names of president
and secretary of your club to the
Idaho Republican as soon as organ
ized. Ring or write us. Give names
of while club is convenient.
of the Gods,
if
will
bond buyers will assemble represent
ing about twenty or twenty-five dif
ferent bonding houses, and they will
>id high for the bonds.
Experience of Salt Lake
Down at Salt Lake 'City a few days
ago, 5 per cent bonds amounting to
a million and a half, sold for a frac
tion of a cent above par, following
an ordinary majority vote in their
favor. Over at Twin Falls, following
a vote of 97.5 per cent in favor of
the bonds, 5% per cent bonds sold
at 103.
Bingham county finances
are in good shape, the county is over
flowing with undeveloped resources
ready to yield to the touch .of the
worker and the investor, and if we
shall record a vote of about 98 per
cent in favor of bonds, with the in
terest, at say, 6% per cent, we might
go an eighth of a cent better than
Twin Falls and sell' ours at 103.125
which would mean a premium of
$18,750. That last one-eighth of a
cenf on the bid would mean $760
added to our pile 6f money, and a
few votes added to ,an ordinary ma
jority would easily influence the
bids that, much, the reason being
that a nearly unanimous vote as
sures the bonding company that no
contest ean arise over the election,
and a unanimous popular will re
corded at the polls means a loyal
and responsible people who will pay
their debts cheerfully when due. On
such a people bonding companies
will bid higher than on any others,
and we might as well capitalize
good name as anybody.
it
our
How We Would Advertse It
If Bingham County should go over
the top with its bond issue to the
tune of sbout.98 per cent pure, with
several precincts pure, The Idaho
Republican would publish an article
about it, and send marked copies
to every newspaper In the state with
the request that they print a para
graph about it. Marked copies
would also go out to bonding com
panies and manufacturers of and
dealers in road-building machinery,
and we should soon have a reputa
tion in connection with that enter
prising valley that is pushing the
Dubois project and going after the
Willard-Dempsey boxing bout. All
these things help to make a county
famous, and a famous locality at
tracts the fellows who have push,
pluck, brains and money.
Would be a Hard Blow
If our bond election should carry
by a mere majority of 85 or 90 per
cent, we could not make any hit
M
i
OOOOOOI
ooooooo
$


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i
\
The Great Hot Spot Engi
has made the Chalmers one of
the few great cars of the world
ne
HIS great engine, which now has
a record of many million miles be
hind it, has created
ment in the automobile industry.
It has swung the attenton from multi
cylinders, extra valves and the like Jo the
subject of getting-the-very-last-bit-of-power
out-of-every-drop-of-gas.
For gas has gone down and down in
grade; the price has gone up and up; and
cars have not preformed as once they did,
while the public-began to say "they weren't
making cars as well as they used to."
The public was wrong,
car. It was the low grade gas. The food
for an engine had changed; a new digestive
organ was needed.
Among the first to observe this condit:
were the Chalmers engineers. They were
the first to supply the
They designed a Hot Spot detice and
attached a new type of inltake manifold
now known as the famous Ram's-horn.
By means of the Hot Spot they cracked
up, fine as powder, and heated the gas after
it left the carbureter. This put the
perfect shape for combustion.
Now the task was to get this "fine as
powder," or as the engineers say "dry gas"
T
into, the cylinders without letting it condense
cn the short 18-inch but hazardous journey.
Gas is tricky.
They succeeded in designing a brand
type of canal or manifold—minus angles,
corners, sharp corners and the like—and
this they call the Ram's-hom.
Any man who drives a Hot Spot Chal
mers can tell you how wonderful these two
devices work.
a new move
new
They have made the Chalmers
great nuotmobile. This is what they
complished:
Almost immediate starting on a cold day.
Perfect engine running in 30 seconds on '
a cold day.
More power out of gas than has
been extracted before.
Prevent raw
now a
ac
It was not the
1
ever
on
gas from going past the
pistons into the crank case and subsequent
luberication trouble.
Develop a smoother, softer kind of power.
Cause a lower upkeep cost thru less
vibration.
answer.
Spin more mileage out of every gallon.
Cause the engine to run cooler on a hot
gas in
day.
There are many more.
See the new Chalmers.
|
Andren Auto Company
Blackfoot, Idaho
Phone 474
»
>v sending out marked copies of it,
or reporting it to the associated
press. It would belittle our county
to push such a report Our bonds
would sell, but at a lower figure;
our commissioners would be slightly
discredited by the fact that 10 or
15 per cent of the voters questioned
their ability to build some hard sur
aced roads in a flat country where
there are no engineering problems,
even when supplied with the money
to pay the bills. The commissioners
might feel, down in their*hearts,
that if it were not for the loyal ma
jority they would like to resign and
be relieved of the task of serving
ungrateful men.
A Friend or an Enemy
There is no half-way. place in this
bond business that is worth while.
The folks who have it in mind to
vote against the bonds for this, that
or the other reason or just to vent
their feelings, wield a poisoned lead
pencil when they mark their ballots
—a pencil that knocks the values
out of our bonds faster than many
hard workers can earn it again and
they injure the future of the county
by making it appear among the third
rate counties inhabited by third-rate
people.
Be careful about using the pois
oned pencil. It's like onp'a tongue,
can bring good or evil at
stroke.
any
SQUABBLE OVER CITY WALLS
People of Canton, China, Divided Over
Question Which the Progressives
Have Put Forward.
There's a "tempest in a teapot," and
a China teapot at that, over the pro
posal la Canfon, China, to take down
the ancient city walls. "Shades of our
ancestors," say some of the Cantonese,
"it is a sacrilege. It is an evil plan
inspired by foreign devils. Never has
It been done. Never shall It be. If
our forefathers got along with dty
walls, so should we."
Such feeling against removal of the
walls Is expressed In the form of a
protest by some of the members of the
Merchants' guild to the civil governor,
according to the Canton Times, which
is for the removal of the walls "on
account of the congestion of population
and of facilitating communications in
the city," and because "public health
demands wider roads and more air for
the people."
After admitting that the protest is
based on the "grounds that demolition
of homes along the walls would deprive
hundreds of thousands of their liveli
hood," the Times, with true Oriental In
difference as to the effect of such treat
ment on said gentry, says: "If the
gentry think otherwise they should be
dumped info the river."
Here and Ghere
By Mas. Byrd Trego
The Y. M. C. A. is frantically put
ting out pamphlets and folders ad
vertising the fact that- the associa
tion has been harmfully maligned.
This shows the truth of the theory
of advertising, that it gets read, and
has results. If the "Y" will Just give
out enough information about its
real accomplishments it will go far
toward fending off prejudice, for it
did much for the soldiers that they
took for granted and soon forgot.
This wave of censure that hit the
"Y" after peace opened our mouths
and loosed our pens commenced at
the front line trenches a long time
ago. The men had grievances, but
in those days it was shocking to say
anything against the association that
had convinced the nation of its own
great work, while collecting large
and necessary funds for that work.
grievances were petty.
Scarcely any of them but might have
been easily counteracted by a
brotherly spirit of service on the part
of the "Y" workers themselves.
There is where they were shy. That
is the point of departure between the*
promising greatness of the assocla
tion and the threatened squelching
of today on uia dayir hm-imn
or today on the dark horizon.
Y. M. C. A. secretaries in the army
The
service had the status of officers.
That barred the common soldier
from equality with them. Whenever
Mr. Doughboy met the secretary he
was a recipient of favors and help
fulness of all sorts, and the secretary
was the giver. They had little in
common. Therefor it took a good
man in the secretary's job to prevent
a certain antagonism. Sure the men
wanted the comforts the "Y" pro
vided, but they didn't want to feel
like objects of charity when they ac
cepted them. Had most of the "Y"
secretaries been of the big-brother
sort of fellow, as Indeed a large num
ber of them were, all had gone bet
ter.—F. C. K.
BLACKFOOT MAN
eet nf , h .
nosed Willard P p£
^ flght at P °T
cutello, and of-Idaho s resources and
scenery awaiting the call of the vis
ltors.
GROWING FAMOUS
One of the latest compliments to
Blackfoot is found in the New West
Magazine, published by R. W.
Spangler of Salt Lake City, in which
is reproduced the Interview of Alex
ander Younie on "Business condi
tions after the war," as published in
the Idaho Republican of last August
and again in March.
Editor Spangler pays a fine tribute
to Mr. Younle's observations and
wisdom. Spangler is now at Poca
tello advertising Idaho in all the pub
lications of the nation that he can

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