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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, April 18, 1919, Image 1

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Wq? ifoalfo SU'jntliltran
Official Paper of City and County
v'ol. XV. No. 40
BLACKFOOT, BINGHAM COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY ~ APRIL 18, 1919
$3 a Year
SPIRIT OF ENTHUSIASM STRONG FOR
PROPOSED TEMPLE OF AGRICULTURE
Some Local Business Men Volunteered Subscrip*
tions Immediately; Express Satisfaction
and Offer Some Suggestions
MEETING AT CITY HALL THURS. NIGHT
Senator Nugent Will
be Here Tuesday Eve.
Senator John P. Nugent of Boise,
will speak at the high school audi
torium in Blackfoot Tuesday even
ing, April 22. The senator is one
of Idaho's most celebrated orators,
has his subjects well in hand in a
lawyer's way, and delivers a non
political address on the subject of
the Victory loan, the Snake river
plains development and the league
of nations. The latter is his prin
cipal topic, but as a timely matter,
he discusses the new loan ,and
a compliment to this territory he
takes up briefly the Snake river
plains and their future.
Everybody is welcome and there
is no charge at the door. Every
body can afford to learn a good deal
about these vital things, tho it costs
an evening of time.
as
4
Window Vies With
Special Trophy Train
The south window of the Rowles
Mack men's furnishing store on
Main street has set up a friendly
competition with the trophy train
that will be seen in Blackfoot Fri
day, and will afford an opportunity
for interested persons to study a
little more carefully several things
they may get a glance at while the
train is here. One of the deadly
German machine guns that our
enemy had in such quantities and
fired with such stubbornness and
treachery all thru the struggle, and
which formed the dangerous, "nests"
whose capture led to many an
American's getting the "croix de
guerre" is the central piece of the
display. Around it may be seen
German helmets, a three-inch Ameri
can shell projectile, a Frepch "75"
shell case, a German belt (captured
by Floyd McDonald in France from
four Germans,) German insignia,
American and French gas masks and
other souvenirs that tell part of the
great story.
4
EASTER SERVICES AT ST.
PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Holy communion at 8.30 a. m.
Afternoon service at 4.30.
The following music will be
rendered:
Processional hyum, Victory
Christ Our Passover
Bloria .
Te Deum .
Jubilate Deo .
Hymn, "Jesus Lives"
Offertory Solo "Hosanna Julias
Granier
Offertory sentence
Recessional hymn
"Jesus Christ is Risen Today"
Everybody is invited to this ser
.121
..Mornington
.Robinson
Van Buskirk
....Woodwam
.122
Mrs. Sam A. Forter
Whitney
. 112 *
vice.
REV. ROBERT LEE LEWIS,
Rector.
4
OOMMI 8 SIONER 8 VIEW
COUNTY HIGHWAYS
The county commissioners, M. A.
Fugate, James Christensen and R.
G. Bills, held sessions all week at
the court house, spending most of
the time on routine matters, attend
ing to the bills, and arranging for
the sale of the road bonds.
On Thursday the commissioners
took a car and went over some of the
county roads, inspecting their condi
tion, and settling disputes.
-4*
COUNTY CLUB LEADER *
TO TAKE UP DUTIES
L. E. Tlllotson, of the Minnesota
agricultural college, came to Blaek
foot Tuesday to take up his work as
county leader of boys' and girls'
clubs, for stimulating Interest in
raising farm products and stock. For
the present Mr. and Mrs. Tlllotson
are at the Eccles hotel, looking
meanwhile for a house to make their
home In.
Orpheum Theater
Friday-Saturday
Douglas Fairbanks
Monday Only
The Rotation Stock company
with EL Forrest Taylor and
Miss Ada Daniels in New
York's latest success.
in
'Say, Young Fellow'
"regular" Fairbanks picture
with the usual thrills and
laughs.
A Stitch in Time
u

A beautiful play with splendid
comedy.
Usual Prices: 50c-75c-$1.00
Vitagraph Comedy
Saturday Matinee 2.30
The men of Blackfoot are re
quested to meet at 8 o'clock tonight
(Thursday) at the City Hall to ar
range some of the finals regarding
the federal building and some of the
preliminaries regarding the temple
of agriculture. Matters pertaining
to the federal building, or rather to
securing the site for the building,
have been thrashed out and agreed
upon several weeks ago, but various
matters prevented the final arrange
ment of the corporation from being
closed. These will be the first mat
ters to be discussed and settled in
tonight's meeting and after that is
finished there will be a short dis
cussion of matters pertaining to the
temple of agriculture.
Preliminary Plans Announced
In Tuesday's paper we announced
the preliminary plans for the build
ing to be used for the farm bureau,
the county agent's office, the labor
agent's office, a large assembly hall
for meetings and conventions of
stockmen, the same hall to be used
for exhibits of all things pertaining
to agriculture. We also suggested
having offices for the real estate
men in the building, with inside
doors connecting their offices with
the exhibit or assembly hall so that
all of the real estate men could show
Continued on page five
LAST SITTING OF
OUTGOING COUNCIL
More Sidewalks to be
Laid and New Streets
Will Be Opened
SALARIES FIXED
The city council held a long ses
sion for its last regular transaction
of business Tuesday evening, closing
up so far as possible, all unfinished
matters that were in hand,
counciimen were all present with the
exception of Mr. Hendrie, who is
convalescing in California, after an
illness.
The
Some New Sidewalks
Leo Henish, Mr. Dahman, D. O.
Palmer, James Young and others of
their neighborhood petitioned the
council to arrange for the laying of
sidewalks before their homes. The
street and alley committee was
charged with this matter and a few
more signatures to the petition will
be required.
It was decided to open a street to
make an extension of Maple street.
Salaries of Incoming Council
A committee report on fixing the
salaries of the incoming council was
There was no change
from the present raie fc' all city of
ficials, excepting the city Treaburar,
who will from this on have to keefi
the treasury books, and whose re
muneration was raised from $50 a
year to $240 a year.
Regulation of Amusements
A petition circulated and signed
by members of the W. C. T. U., the
B. Y. P. U., Women's Baptist union
and Rev. George T. Peacock of the
American S. S. union, came to the
council, asking that evening amuse
ments attended by school children
be regulated, so that those of tender
years might be kept away from
dangerous late hours.
An old city ordinance was looked
up in this regard, and it said that
children under eighteen years should
not be permitted to loaf or loiter
about the streets, saloons or gambl
ing places between the hours of 9
in the evening and 6 in the morning.
Several building permits were
granted, principally for small frame
garages and sheds; one chicken
fence, and a dwelling of six rooms,
This council- will come together
once more, at the first meeting of
the new body, to hand over the
reigns of government and the city
keys.
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4- ENTER EASTER SUNDAY
+ -
4* Special services will be
4* served in all the churches next
4* Sunday to celebrate the com
t ing »f spring, the end of lent,
4- and good will to all, besides
•• other things too numerous to
4* mention.
4* Eggs will be colored in pea
4* cock hues and eaten hard as
4* rocks; picnics will attract many
4* motorists. The stores have put
4* forth their bravest Wares, as
4-.everybody knows is fitting, and
4* Skaggs' bunnies chewed the
4* feet off the little chicks' legs to
4- show their timely enthusiasm.
4*4"4*4>4 , 4'4 , 4*4 , 4-4*4 , 4*4*4 , +
Volunteer Buying is
Victory Loan Plan
Bingham County Will go Over Top
Without Making Allotments
or Any Canvass
STEP INTO THE BANK NOW
It was announced Wednesday by
H. D. MacCosham, acting chairman
of the county liberty lean committee,
that for the last big loan drive Bing
ham county will not need to be
asked. Every bank in the county
will be prepared to sell the bonds to
any volunteer investor who steps in
with the first payment.
Bingham county's quota is only
about two-thirds what it was last
time
gloriously over the top, and many
persons who have learned that the
bonds will be taken on the volun
tary plan have already signified their
desire to double the amount they
would have been asked for.
Names to be Published
Inasmuch as the buying of the
Victory bonds will be a matter of
sweet free will on the part of every
individual, the names of all buyers
will be published in the papers as
they come in, and are reported by
' the banks, with the amounts they
j purchased opposite their names.
Monday the Rush
According to every indication
there will be a very lively competi
tion Monday when all true American
style fellows, and women too, will
be trying to get high up on the list,
and write themselves down as not
only ready to stay in the game, but
anxious to be among the first to back
the United States in the last obliga
tion of a well finished task.
when the county went so
*
FARM BUREAU FAV
ORS IDEA OF HOME
Discussed by Farmers
and Business Men
at Meeting
INCREASE BUDGET
Representatives of the Bingham
county farm bureau met Wednesday
morning at 10 o'clock and held coun
cil with a number of Blackfoot busi
ness men on two matters of present
great importance to the forward
movement of the bureau. These
matters were an increase in the bud
get oi the ikra 'uirreau, and pre
liminary planning for a farm bureau
building.
The greatest good-will for co
operation between these business
men and the farmers of the County
was apparent all thru the meeting.
It was quickly decided that the past
accomplishments of the bureau
would justify an increase in the
budget from $5000 to $7500 and
the whole assembly agreed to call
upon the commissioners in a body in
the afternoon. The business men
representing Blackfoot were H. D.
MacCosham, Ernest Pearson, George
A. Jorgensen, Fred Seeger, C. S.
Beebe and Frank Garvin.
Agent Needs Assistant
Chairman G. A. Line presented to
the bureau members at the first of
the meeting, data representing the
financial needs, past and coming, of
the office. He pointed out that the
county agent needed an assistant,
the office needed stationery with its
own heading. He showed how the
organization had grown rapidly and
outstripped in usefulness all that
had at first been hoped for. -
as to assistance, County Agent
Monroe stated that altho he would
have a county club leader with him
in the office, the work of each was
enough to keep them both outside.
He said he could spend six days a
week out in the country carrying on
special campaigns of helpfulness,
but that the office work kept him in
more or less. It was suggested that
the two positions of labor agent and
assistant county agent be combined,
so that ofte man should be added to
the permanent bureau personnel, and
the suggestion was approved.
Rent to be Raised
D. H. Biethan appeared before
the meeting to advise that on May
1 the present lease, by which the
bureau holds its offices on Pacific
street at $30 a month, would expire,
and that he thought he should re
ceive a higher rental. The matter
was satisfactorily arranged with Mr.
Biethan, so that the bureau will
(keep the offices at a slightly raised
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4*
4
4* STEP INTO THE BANK
4
4*
4* That is the last slogan of the
4* war. It bears the most im
4- portant urge of all the slogans,
4* because what America has won
4* in two years, a high reputation
4%'for going over the top with a
4* rush, may easily be dimmed by
4» a slow follow-up in the last act.
4* During danger .the nation did
4- not take a chance on toluntary
4* support in either men or money.
4* Now is the opportunity to prote
4* what would have happened had
4* it always been "Step into the
4* bank." The drive opens April
4* 21, and ends May 10.
4 . 4 . 4 . 4 . 4 . 4 ^ 4 > 4 > 4 > 4 . 4 ,,{. 4 i 4 . 4 i 4 .
_ , .
Tried to Bring:
r .1 . y?. ..
r lying Circus Here
-
Liberty Loan Committee Sent Tele
grams Galore, But Were
Not Successful
4*
4*
4
TO FLY AT POCATELLO FRIDAY
The local 'liberty loan committee
made the telegraph wires hot for
some time Tuesday and Wednesday
trying to secure for Blackfoot a visit
of the flying circus of airships which
will be seen at Pocatello Friday in
the interest of the Victory liberty
loan.
ceived from State Chairman Gwinn
to the effect that it would be impos
sible for the fliers to come to Black
foot.
Finally a telegram was re
The "circus" will be a novelty to
folks who have not had much of an
opportunity to see modern flying
stunts.
pulled off many of the tricks of com
bat and acrobatic "turns" developed
during the war.
worth a trip to Pocatello.
No doubt there will be
It will be well
4
METHODLST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
The Easter services open with a
devotional meeting at 7.30 a. m. by
the Epworth league. Topic "The
Morning Watch." Sunday school at
10 o'clock. The morning worship
at the usual hour. Sermon subject
"The Immortality of the Soul."
Baptismal service. Special and ap
propriate music by the choir.
The Easter program by the Sun
day school is at 8 o'clock p. m.
Everyone is heartily invited to these
services.
4 *—
SUGAR CITY BOY
WINNER OF D.S.C.
Decorated for Gallantry
By General Pershing
on October 16
ACT OF~BRAVERY
One of the most heroic incidents
in the American battle experience in
France has for its central figure a
young man from Sugar City, Private
Thomas C. Neibaur. He was deco
rated by General Pershing near
Landres-et-St. Georges on October
16, 1918, for consplcious gallantry
in action, and later was a guest of
Ate general, when with several of
ficer's • C' high rank, he entertained
a number of"feiK! Qted men who had
distinguished themseivdS IQ Rattle.
No greater act of bravery is con
tained bn the annals of the world war
than that of the Sugar City soldier.
The Cote de Chatillen had just been
gained after bitter fighting, and the
summit of that strong bulwark in
the Kriemhilde Stellung was being
organized when Private Neibour was
sent on patrol with his automatic
rifle squad to enfilade enemy ma
chine-gun nests. Hardly had he set
up his rifle before he was wounded
in both legs by machine-gun fire on
his flank and the German troops com
menced a counter-attack in an effort
to drive the Americans from the
ground lost to them.
The other members of the detach
ment with Private Neibaur were
either killed or wounded, and tho
badly injured himself and cut off and
almost surrounded, he continued to
fight, using his automatic rifle with
deadly effectiveness among the Huns,
and thru his individual efforts,
coupled with the rifle fire from the
skirmish line formed by his company
100 yards to his rear, he succeeded
in checking the German advance.
After th^ wave of the onsweeping
enemy had been held up, four Ger
mans crawled forward to attack Pri
vate Neibaur at close quarters. He
killed them, one at a time, and tfien,
despite the pain in his legs, he com
menced to crawl forward, with his
gun among the enemies whom he
had halted, and in the midst of a
heavy rifle fire from his comrades in
the rear he cooly demanded and re
ceived the surrender of eleven Ger
mans, taking them at the point of
his pistol, and heedless of the suf
fering resulting from his injuries,
he returned to his own lines with
his captives, forcing them to march
ahead of him. •
Private Neibaur's bravery resulted
in a great measure in the arrest of
the counter-attack sprung upon the
Americans, and it was in recognition
of the gallent act that General Persh
ing decorated the Sugar City soldier
in full view of the regiment—an
POCATELLO CONTINUES TO FORMULATE
PLANS FOR WILLARD-DEMPSEY CONTEST
Reasons Why Pocatello Gets the Big Bout
Contained in the Fourteen Points
Outlined Herewith
are
PROMISE NUMEROUS ACCOMMODATIONS
J- Robb Brady, president of the
Pocatello Athletic club, that is so
strenuously bidding for the Willard
Dempsey contest that it looks as tho
-it might come west, in spite of a
world of opposition. Mr. Brady is
a prime support in the club's ef
forts; he is sparing neither money
nor energy to secure this distinctive
bout for Pocateiio.
In addition to 2700 sleeping cars
and "*^0 diners, promised for hous
ing and feeding the crowds, by the
Union Pacific general passenger
agent, D. S. Spencer, Pocatello is
preparing to build an immense tent
city, construction which will
mence two days after "Tex" Rickard
names Pocatello the battle ground.
Pocatello's Fourteen Points
Pocatello, Idaho, a city of 20,
000 people, is geographically located
to serve four main trunk lines of
transcontinental railroad system and
train services are adequate to handle
•a gigantic throng.
The trunk line running northward
out of Pocatello taps Montana and
the Canadian provinces,
running west to Portland affords op
portunity of travel to the entire
Pacific coast. Southward from Po
catello the line rus directly to the
cities of Ogden and Salt Lake, and to
the east the main line of the system
gives ample accommodations for
handling crowds of any proportion
Continued on page two
com
a
The line
TROPHY TRAIN
ON MACKAY TRACK
People From all Over
County Expected to
be in for Exhibit
HERE TWO HOURS
Every one in the county that
possibly get here is expected to be
in Blackfoot, Friday afternoon to
view the trophy train which is
ing in the interest of the Victorv
liberty loan.
The train, consisting of five cars,
will be spotted on the Mackay sid
ing, at the south side of the passen
ger depot. The school children of
the county, under the supervision
of their teachers, will be lined up
Main street opposite the siding,
ready to pass thru the one baggage
car which carries the small exhibits,
after which they will move along the
other four flat cars, which contain
the heavier and larger exhibits such
as the big machine guns etc.
The crowds are asked'to take their
positions on Main street and move
along from car to- car with the speak
ers. If every one will help to carry
out this plan people will stand a bet
ter chance of seeing all there is to
see. Governor Davie will be among
the speakers and Sergeant Bates will
explain and acquaint us with the
numerous exhibits.
can
com
on
The train will arrive in Blackfoot
at 1.15 and remain until 3.15, during
which short time thousands of peo
vtoyftre expected to collect, so the
comnftuee 1115 "''fly requests that the
crowds gather prow^*y iLl o'clock.
Local soldier boys in uniftji m. -2**}
have general charge in the way of
taking care of the crowds. Band
music will be furnished by the Alamo
shows band.
Provisions have been made to at
this time have the Civil and Spanish
American war veterans represented.
Inasmuch as the crowd will be
large and the time short, people are
earnestly requested to co-operate
with the committee as much as pos
sible in carrying out the program of
reviewing the trophies.
Business houses are asked to
more fully express a spirit of loyalty
and patriotism by decorating their
business places with flags and
bunting.
J
4
DEATH OF MRS. PETERSON
Mrs. Fred Peterson, age twenty
seven years, died at her home in
Groveland Sunday evening, after suf
fering for two weeks with asthma
and influenza.
Besides a devoted husband she is
survived by two children, Elton
seven years of age and a baby boy,
Harold, fourteen months old, her
mother and father Mr. and Mrs. J.
F. Tracey, four sisters and one
brother, three cousins, Samuel Chap
man of Groveland, J. E. Chapman
of Rose and Mrs. A. H. Kruse of
Riverside.
The remains were taken to Oakley
Wednesday where interment will be
made.
Mrs. Peterson came to this com
munity two years ago, from Oakley,
Idaho.
honor craved by every overseas sol- 4
dier.
In a letter to his mother recently
Private Neibaur said that stiffness
in his knees resulting from the
wounds had about disappeared.
4*
Sugar Beet Growers
to Form Association
With the co-operation of members
of the Bingham county farm bureau
an organization of sugar beet grow
ers is being put on its feet, which
will give aid to producers in matters
of contract and dump rights.
A corporation will be formed in
this county at once with Arthur Man
waring temporary president and G.
A. Connell temporary secretary. Mr.
Manwaring is vice-president of the
farm bureau and head of the cfops
and markets department. Mr. Con
ned is county chairman of sugar beet
projects. It is as active workers in
the farm bureau that Mr. Manwaring
and Mr. Connell are boosting for the
new organization, believing that it
will greatly benefit the individual
growers.
Next fall an invitation will be sent
out to every county to send repre
sentatives here, and the corporation
will be enlarged to take them all in.
Advertise Counties
as Suitable for Homes
Eastern people are looking toward
Idaho with a view to choosing it for
a home. One of the first questions
asked is "What are the education!
advantages, both religious and
secular?" Conventions have been
held in all parts of our state to
boost other lines, but one of the best
has received little attention from
advertisers'. During April each
county will have a chance to send
representatives to a publicity conven
tion to make known reasons why
their county is the best one in the
state in which to make a home; for
you believe in character building.
Nampa plans to entertain at least
160 delegates and you may have your
share. Study your own county; get
the best you have for representatives
to tell about and for us to send from
there on thru the east. Idaho has
gone "over the top" In all war activ
ities; now let he show that she is
ready to take an active part In
character building for clean govern
ment during the reconstruction
period.
L. M. ORMSBY.
4
TO LOCATE AT ST. ANTHONY
Mrs. Millard Boice and little son
left Wednesday afternoon for St.
Anthony, where they will join Mr.
Boice, who is employed in a meat
market at that place. They will
make their home there.
Mr. Boice was recently discharged
from the service as a marine and im
mediately went to work at hfa old
trade. Before entering the army he
was in the service of the Idaho Meat
Market.
W, C. T. U. MEETING
The W. C. T. U. will meet at the
Baptist church, Tuesday afternoon,
April 22, at 2.30 o'clock sharp.
Subject: "Moral and Physical De
velopment of the Child From Four
to Twelve Yiears." All mothers are
urged to be present. Refreshments
will be served.

"''A _
-4*
INFANT AT RIVERSIDE DIES
The seven-months C3 daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus Heltf ^***
Riverside 1 ; died Monday of pneu
monia. The body was sent to Salt
Lake City for burial Tuesday, April
15.
-4*
ASTONISHING SOUVENIR IN
ROWLES-MACK WINDOW
One of the most interesting
souvenirs yet to be shown in Black
foot is in the Rowles-Mack window.
It was brought home alive from the
trenches in France by a soldier, but
just by whom is rather a mystery.
Thi
has wihgs, it is red, it has a ferocious
head, upon which may be seen the
aviation insignia. Its heavy red
wings are camouflage for a pair of
deadly spurs which the animal wears
on its heels. It is very Interesting.
is a "flying cootie." It
•F
WHERE ARE THESE HORSES?
Lost about the twenty-fifth of
March a sorrel, 5 years, 1000 pounds
white star in forehead, hind foot
white; a blue-gray 3 year, 1200
pounds, three humps on left hind
knee; a gray, 6 years, 1200 pounds,
right front leg crooked; a black,
11 years, 1200 pounds, hind foot a
little «hite, warts in ears; a brown
mare, 8 years, 1400 pounds, white
star in forehead, in foal. Reward
of $5.00.
Taber, Idaho.
Notify Jacob Schott,
adv. 39a-2p.
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WANTED
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4* Chambermaid at the Eccles 4*
4- Hotel; salary $40.00.
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