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The Idaho Republican. [volume] (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, February 20, 1920, Image 4

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DEFINITE DATA ON
TABLE ROCK DAM
Survey Shows Reservoir
That Will Store
Many Acre Feet
of Water.
HELP I S~A S K E D
O. S. L. Want* Canal
Companies to As
sist in Work
Additional data has just been ob
tained relative to the river above
Table Rock, the proposed site of the
new reservoir, says the Idaho Falls
Times. Information has been re
ceived from the O. S. L. covering
their survey of that portion of the
river and their notes gives the dis
tance from Table Rock' to Garden
creek, in Conant valley as sixteen
miles and the fall 136 feet. This
gives an average fall of a little over
eight feet to the mile and a dam at
Table Rock 136 feet high would back
the water to Garden creek, and is
estimated would impound something
like 700,000 acre feet. A dam 200
feet high would store sufficient water
to develop practically the whole of
the upper country. It is estimated
that this dam could be put in for
two million dollars.
The committee has sent out notices
to the various canals of the upper
country requesting that they send in
the small amount of one-fourth of a
cent for every inch of water owned
by the canal, for the purpose of mak
ing a preliminary survey. Many of
the canals have responded and it is
anticipated that enough will send in
their amounts to make up the needed
sum by the middle of February. If
the survey can be started at that
time it is figured that a definite re
port can be made by the middle if
March.
From present indications our win
ter is about over—at least the snow
producing part has passed. Ranch
ers living in the Jackson Hole and
up the South Fork country, all re.
port that the snow at this writing is
actually less now than at this time
iast year. It is reported that the
divide between Victor and Jackson
Hole contains only two feet of snow,
whereas last year at this time there
was four feet on this divide, and that
in normal years there is eight feet.
this proves to us that the snow
fall in that country is but 25 per cent
of normal, and only 50 per cent of
what existed there at this time last
winter. These reports show the con
dition to be much worse now than
last year, and it is an unpleasant
memory as to what happened in this
upper valley last summer.
The winter of 1917 and 1918 was
a very heavy one as far as depositing
snow in the mountains that form the
great water-shed of the south fork of
Snake river. In the spring of 1918
we had the highest water known to
these parts in many years. The
mountains became thoroly saturated
with water in 1918, and this did
much to help out in 1919. Last year
was tne dryest known in this country
for many years and we have to start
out this season with the knowledge
that the mountains were the dryest
and contained less water than for
many years past, which would natur
ally affect this season's supply even
if we had plenty of snow this winter.
But with a loss supply this winter
than we had last, and the dryest year
in our agricultural history in connec
tion therewith ,the outlook for this
season's supply of water is anything
but encouraging.
We are not pessimists, but we feaj
it our duty to outline conditions as
they are and call attention to the
need of safeguarding against a re
currance of this condition which
threatens our very existence in this
upper valley which depends upon ir
rigation. This valley is rich and
well able to build a reservoir to for
ever protect against-just such emer
gencies that we are face to face with
now. Two propositions have been
put up to the farmers. They should
at least make the necessary investi
' gations and soon determine which is
the best for them to take, and then
build the reservoir best calculated to
serve this upper valley.
There was a lot of water carried
over in the Jackson Lake reservoir
from 1918 to help out in 1919, but
notwithstanding this, conditions were
such that there was not sufficient
water from the small watershed
above the reservoir to fill this reser
voir more than three-fourtlis capac
ity last spring. Last sumnei the
gates of the Jackson dam were
hoisted clear of the water the latter
part of July and were not again low
ered till the irrigation season was
over, so we start out this year with
the jackson laae empty, and unless
we get a lot more snow than we'us
ually get from now on till spring;
this reservoir won't be over half full
when the irrigation season starts
next summer, and there will be a
great scramble for water during our
irrigation season next summer. Of
course we cannot remedy this condi
tion now, only by all the farmers get
ting the water in their canals and
ditches and filling this country up
with water before the usual time
when water is turned out.
This will help us much and also
hold the water up here in our under
ground reservoir for the people be
low, so they will get it in July and tlon.
August. This early irrigation and
filling up of the canals and ditches,
swails and ponds on all farms it
seems is our only salvation this year.
Lets do this and also get busy on the
reservoir problem. Water should be
turned in all the canals as soon as
the ice is out, .without waiting to
clean them. We can get along one
year without cleaning and repairing,
for the canals evidently will . hold
more water than we will have to run
in them. These are facts we are
confronted with and we hope all will
heed them and act accordingly.
at
all
Ing
he
20
cent
eign
y
the
all
ders,
or
er
the
will
can
States
have
will
fnd„
Ian
Roman
to
she
her
by
that
If. $. IMPORTERS
ARE WAXING FAT
Slump in Money Value Brings
Big -Profits.
ALL EUROPE IS AFFECTED
American Changes His Good U. 8.
Money Into British, French or Ital
ian Currency,, Then Buy* Good*
Which He Ships to the United
States, Where, Because of Inflation
of American Dollar, He Reaps Big
Profit
ob
the .
re
the
at
is
of
in
a
of
is
in
If
if
is
becomes a fact for the American na
tlon.
American Importers now purchasing
goods in England. France and Italy
for shipment to the United States, are
waxing fat as a result of the depreci
ation of the pound sterling, the franc
and lira, according to stories now go
ing the rounds of the New York whole
sale district.
The only "fly tn the ointment" for
the American buyers abroad Is the
fact that, by a presidential order
eral weeks ago, United States consuls
are required to keep tab on big pur
chases. ascertain the selling price and
cable these facts to the United States
customs authorities.
Ing the rate of exchange on the date
of purchase, the governmentls enabled
to set a proper value upon the goods,
for the coll >etlon of^ Import duties. A
court of claims passes upon what are
alleged to be unfair appraisals.
How It Is Done.
The situation Is said to be somewhat
like this:
An American buying pound sterling
say, on December 12, needed to pay in
American money only $3.66 for, British
currency normally worth about $4.87.
Now he goes to a factory in Notting
ham, England, to buy laces, and there,
although prices of course are higher
than before the war, he pays for them
In this depreciated money and makes
a "handsome" profit. Then he ships
the laces to the United' States, where
by reason of the Inflation of the Amer
ican dollar, they are retailed for from
100 to 150 per cent above prewar
prices.
The same Importer, on the same
date, we will say, goes to France. In
Paris he has exchanged his American
dollars for francs. Normally there are
5.18% francs to the dollar, but now he
finds one Yankee "slmoleon" will buy
11.52 francs, about 60 per cent more
than before the war. The price of
silks has gone up, but be goes to Ly
ons, and .there, with his depreciated
French money, he buys more than he
has'wver bought before at "bargain"
prices. The- silks reach New York,
where they are sold to the consumer
at double their former retail price.
Next this importer visits Italy,
where he finds the lira, 5.18% of
which, like the franc, could be bought
for one American dollar, now at a vast
discount. In fact, he receives 13.47
lira for one American dollar and. well
financed, he goes to Naples, where he
negotiates the purchase of tapestries
costing, of course, more.than In 11114,
hut in reality cheaper when pnrchased
with the present Italian currency.
The same financial conditions exist
all over Europe, and In the former
central empires, of course, they are
reported much worse. In the allied
countries, however, where there Is na
tlonal stability and greater ability to
pay, the depredated money Is effect- a
Ing some strange changes. A dinner
which, before the war. In Paris could
he had for a nominal sura, now costs
from 20 to 50 francs.
American manufacturers, mean
while. who desire to sell their products
abroad, are demanding payment In
American dollars at par. Recently the
Belgian government, it Is said, bought
20 American locomotives, for which
payment, instead of being In Belgian
money, was demanded In American
dollars, thus adding from 15 to 20 per
cent to the manufacturer's normal
profit. Naturally this discourages for
eign buying.
sev
Then, by flgur
is'
a
Cancels Big Orders. .
On the other hand, a big American
locomotive concern, apprehensive of
the turn of political affairs abroad,
duetto delay over the pence treaty; is
reported practically to have canceled
all foreign advance orders. Such or
ders, calling for delivery in three, six
or nine months, are said to be prac
tically non-existent In the locomotive
trade. Similar conditions exist In oth
er Industries. That Is why American
manufacturers have been saying:
the peace treaty Is not soon signed It
will mean the complete loss of our
foreign trade."
There are committees of the most
prominent United States bankers and
business men, representing the Ameri
can Bankers' association, the United
States Chamber of Commerce and the
international trade conference, who
have been at work on this problem of
foreign exchange for months, and who
will be ready to remedy the present
situation as soon as the peace treaty
the
ity.
■a
that
are
akin
sas
the
price
mine
work
Gets Back $20 Lost Years AOO
Mrs. Edvvard Joslin of Lafayette,
fnd„ has received $20 from Rev. FI or
Ian Brlede, post or of St. Boniface'*
Roman Catholic church In that city
to replace a similar amount which
she lost 16 years ago. The priest told
her that the money had been found
by some person who recently became
remorseful and confessed to the priesi
that she had kept the money 'from, the
owner.,,-. ^
P.
the
four
mont.
Cavalry Troop
Creates Interest
The young men, especially out of
town in the surrounding country are
quite interested in the proposed
caxalry troop for Blackfoot and
Bingham county, according to the
amount of talk heard on the subject.
These spring days evidently bring
craving for the saddle.
a
4
COOKED FOOD SALE
<A cooked food sale will be given
Saturday at the Pearson grocery by
the members of the Epworth league
of the Methodist church.
8.
•F
ATTENDS FI X ERA I.
i _____
E. A. Melton, superintendent of
schools left Thursday for Mackay,
where he will attend the fuiie/al of
his sister-in-law Mrs. Charles Lemon.
______
£4444444444444444£
V OLUNTEER NURSES
4 In a number of influenza 4
4 cases in ulackfoot and sur- 4
4 rounding territory nursing ser- 4
4 vice is needed, and available 4
4 nurses are asked to list their 4
4 names with Mrs. George Hoi- 4
4 brook at the city hall or with 4
4 W. B. Goodnough at the Good- 4
4 nough Cleaning & Tailoring Co. 4
4 if they desire to volunteer to 4
4 take cases where help is re- 4
4 qulred.
J
*
*
A
fishing, hop picking and dairying.

may benefit by rending the old bulletin,
which treats the technical theme In
a popular manner.
4
4
4
4
444444444444444444
--— -j? -
QUEEN GETS MARVELOUS VEIL
Belgian Lace Experta Worked on
Piece Four Yeare—Designed
by Artiste.
The Queen of the Belgians has
ceived from the lace ami embroidery
works of Belgian Fianders a marvel
ous veil. Surrounded by all the mis
fortune and misery of war these
loyal subjects have toiled In secret
for four long years to produce a unique
piece which they offer In homage to
their queen.
Such Is their devotion to their sov
ereign. '
re
A French publication describes the
veil—designed by the most famous
of Belgian artists and executed by the
most expert workmen, perfect In
every detail of mesh and motif.
Twelve thousand hours were re
quired in workmanship, for the veil
contains not less than 12,000,000 points.
It displays the almost unknown art
of light and shade, a difficult effect
and one of rare beauty. It solves
for the first time, perhaps, the ques
tion of perspective. The entire piece
weighs but four and one-half ounces.
In the center of the veil are the
Belgian! arms, and In the four corners
of the central panel Yhe arms of the
cities of Ypres. Nleuport, Poperlnghe
and Furnes. The four side panels
represent the industries of weaving.
f
trip
who
very
the
are
trict.
for
Lemhi
over
ing
the
ranch
school,
head
cian
were
to
left
tered
the
go
where
them.
G.
P.
week
serving
made
day,
turning
there
in
hides.
Mrs.
parents
The
Andrews,
some
w'eek,
number
birthday
Feb.
Ray
this
of the
Mrs.
Salt
about
+
Frost Discussed in Bulletin.
Discussions of the formation and
seasons of frost and how
l
HH
growing
plants may be protected from It. are
contained In the department of agri
culture's Farmers' Bulletin No. 104,
"Notes on Frost," which may be ob
tained T)y application to the depart
ment. The weather bureau is prepar
ing a more up-to-date publication on
the subject of frosts, and expects to
have It ready for distribution soon, but
In the meantime farmers and others
sale
Falls,
ter
very
of
are
Madrid to Have Subway, I
A few weeks hence there will be a
subway In Spain, and subway trains
running under the streets of Madrid
Then the people of Madrid will have
their first opportunity, to travel un
derground the Rio del Solo to Cua
tro Camlnos, the first half of the line
being constructed more than sixty feet
below the street level. Madrid Itself
is' rapidly modernizing, reports say.
New thoroughfares are being con
structed; new office buildings going
up; and the new subway Is but the
beginning of a metropolitan system in
a city of crowded streets.
Crook Forest Enlarged.
The president has signed a proc
lamation adding 29.440 acres to the
Crook national forest, Arizona. The
lands added are located In the Win
chester mountains and southwest of
the Galiuro division of the Crook forest.
They are rough and broken in char
acter and are not suitable for agricul
tural purposes. Practically the entire
tract Is covered with a stand of oak.
Juniper, and cedar timber of fair qual
ity. Considerable of the area along
Pine canyon is covered with a good
stand of western yellow pine.
Arkansas Diamonds.
Arkansas has several diamond mines
that have turned out about 5,000 dia
monds valued at about $20,000. The
geological formation 'n which the gems
are found Is called pertdotite and Is
akin to the famous Sout)i African kim
berlite. It occurs In chimneys like
those of South America. The Arkan
sas mines have been neglected during
the war. With diamonds Increasing In
price and popularity, it Is said, the
mine owners are making plans t»
work their properties In a more ex
tensive and systematic way.
4
If all the candidates for the G. O.
nomination go to the convention
The bee does not live long, except
the one Bryan has had for twenty
four years.—Greenville (S. C.) Pied
mont.
rr
\
y
A >
j •
. Only Two More Days
MV
You thrifty women have made this sale of white goods
a great success because you have appreciated the savings
offered. Never more than today did quality play so
important a part in true economy. Supply your needs
now in underwear for months to come as well as the
present.
w
. White Goods
India linens. long cloths, flaxens, beach cloth, table
linens ,towels and crashes at a
/
10 %
/
Discount
The reductions on these goods are unusual; provide
well for your yearly needs. *
Corsets at Old
Prices
The manufacturers of
corsets have discontinued
a number of models and
these we have placed on
sale. Spring prices are
much higher hence the
savings.
*
Under Muslins
* •
Ladies' muslin gowns, combinations,
shirts and drawers at a
J
10 %
Discount
Brown
Hart
The
Co.
¥
The Home of
Popular Prices
u
9!
f
M4 » ! -4 4 » i "4- ! -4- H -4- i -4 4»l -» l -4- l
4
G. L. Andrews made a business
trip to Aberdeen Thursday.
The baby of Mr. and Mrs. White
who live near Springfield has been
very 111, but is improving now.
The Westley family are 111 with
the small pox. Several cases of it
are reported in the Grandview dis
trict.
Johnnie Hutchison left this week
for Salmon and other points in
Lemhi county where he was looking
over some stock ranches.
Mrs. L. Mont Rich has been spend
ing a few days with her husband at
the sheep camp on the H. C. C. Rich
ranch at Pingree.
Little James Morrison was very
seriously injured while pjlaying at
school, when he fell on a fresno and
received some bad cuts on the fore
head and across the nose. A physi
cian was called and several slitches
were taken in the wounds.
Mrs. John Herbert has been taken
to the hospital.
Harry Stamp of Roachdale, Ind.
left this week, after selling a regis
tered Belgian stallion to several of
the farmers. James Christensen will
go to Lewiston to select the animal,
where Mr s Stamp has a carload of
them.
G. A. Line is in Boise on business.
P. P. Parsons returned home this
week from Blackfoot, wheer he was
serving as jouror. Court has been
adjourned.
Harry Hamilton and G L. Andrews
made a trip out on the desert Tues
day, looking over the prospects for
turning out their stock but report
there is no water on the desert.
Alvie Nugent is visiting his wife
in Sail Lake City.
Archie Grover and Mr. Halford of
Riverside were here Tuesday buying
hides.
Mrs. Heber Wells is visiting her
parents at Weston, Idaho.
The babjrof Mr. and Mrs/George
Andrews, who has been sick for
some time has been very low the past
w'eek, and is still very seriously ill.
Lillian White is entertaining a
number of her young frends at a
birthday party at her home Saturday,
Feb. 14.
Ray Asto of Blackfoot is touring
this end of the county in the interest
the Raliegh firm.
Mrs. Alvie Nugent is visiting in
Salt Lake City. She has been gone
about three weeks.
STERLING
+
+
4
l
HH 4 4 4 44441 » 1 ♦♦ 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4-1
We buy notes, mortgages, farm
sale contracts and farms. We sell
farms also. Sheppard & Co., Idaho
Falls, Idaho.
ad v. 20a-tf
Ernest Wells is spending the win
ter in Utah visiting relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Maxwell are both
very ill, Mrs. Maxwell being quite
seriously ill.
A baby boy arrive^at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Tiechert
February 5. Both mother and baby
are getting along nicely.
Mrs. E. N. Wells made a trip to
Blackfoot last week.
Miss Jessie Hutchison has resigned
her position with the J. W. Sprague
store.
Mrs. George L. Andrews is suffer
ing with a severe attack of neuralgia.
Mrs. Frank Parr has as her guests
her sister and husband. They ex
pect to be employed on the H. K.
Wiley farm this year, and will move
there after a short visit with the
Parrs.
Mrs. Louis Nugent made a business
trip to Blackfoot last week.
W. W. Hayes of Blackfoot is
spending 4he week here on business.
Mrs. Ben Atkins of Aberdeen is
moving into the W. W. Hayes home,
Money to Loan on Irrigated Lands
J. H. EARLY
33 West Bridge St.
Blackfoot, Idaho
/
Don't Believe All You
Hear
about the scarcity of goods. We
to buy up
manage
At Reasonable Prices
Such limited lines as this.
T
Easy
Cleanly
Kitchen
To
Wash
Ware
SPECIAL SATURDAY ONLY
At $1.69 the Piece
10%x5 3-8 Inch round roastors:
6 quart combination strainer cookers
2% qnart doable boilers
1 % quart coffee percolators.
Racket Store
The D. Edwin Nelson family
reported to be ill with the small
are
pox.
Tony Parsons has traded his home
in Blackfoot to Adrian Parsons for
some registered cattle
brought them here to feed.
Don Shelman has recently
turned from the hospital at Pocatello
where he underwent an operation.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hutchison have
sold their ranch by the canal and are
moving into the L. J. Rich residence,
which was formerly the Tilden school
house.
and has
re
Mrs. W. R. Leach Is spending the
winter in Blackfoot with her daugh
ter Mrs. Charles Nelder.

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