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The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, February 02, 1922, Image 8

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091197/1922-02-02/ed-1/seq-8/

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RA3BITS HARM FRUIT TREES
Pests Gnaw Bark From Trees and
Kill Many—Safest Way Is to
Wrap With Paper.
Rabbits are very troublesome to or
cliardists in some localities. These
pests gnaw the bark from the young
trees and kill many while the trees are
young. In some localities the rabbits
do not wait for winter when green
food is scarce, but late in summer or
early in autumn bark the trees and
injure or ruin them.
The only safe way to protect the
young trees, is to wrap them with
heavy paper or pasteboard. If availa
ble, tar the paper. Some .manufac
turers muke wood or wire veneer that
protects the trees. These materials
are preferable, for they last and are
easily put around the trunks of the
'trees.
But ordinary brown paper
tarred will Inst a season and it does
not take much time to put it on. The
paper is wrapped around the trunks
and tied on with ordinary twine.
Whitewash on the trunks will give
some protection, but it is hardly de
pendable for a season. Rabbits multi
ply very rapidly if let alone. It will
pay to protect the young fru't trees.
PRUNING DAYS ARE AT HAND
Shears Should Be Plied Steadily to
Get Work Out of Way Before
Buay Season Begins.
(Prepared by the United Statea Department
of Aertculture.)
Pruning shears should be plied
•steadily in order to have the task out
of the way in time to prepare for the
field work. Severe pruning of apples
encourages the trees to make exces
sive wood growth, and delays fruiting.
Young trees need only sufficient trim
ming to keep the head well formed,
and to clean out superfluous branches.
All deadwood and about one-third of
the surplus live wood should be re
moved the first year, if the trees are
old or neglected. The pruning of an
old tree should he extended to cover ■
three years.
Thoroughness in spraying, according
to specialists of the United States De
partment of Agriculture, Is absolutely '
essentlat. and from now until tile buds
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Properly Fruncu Mpp.e t ret.
begin to swell is the time to apply the
dormant spray. Use commercial lime
sulphur, one gallon of mixture to nine
gallons of water I
The Montgomery county (Md.) Farm
Bureau Bulletin offers this advice to
the orchardisi: "If you want apples do
your pruning with saw and shears; if
you wunt firewood do it with an ax.
beginning about a foot above the
ground."
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FR0TECT YOUNG APPLE TREES !
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Keep Mice and Rabbits Away by Fly
Screen or Closely-Woven Gal
vanized Wire*.
If there Is a particularly good
young apple tree or two in some part
of the garden, do not fail to clean the
grass or weeds uway from its base
and protect the trunk from mice and
rabbits with fly screen or closely
woven galvanized wire. Thousands of
young apple trees are lost every winter,
in certain sections, from being gnawed
by field mice and rabbits. As a rule,
the mice work just at tin; surface of
the ground, especially where grass
and rubbish is left around the roots
of the trees. Rabbits are more likely
to gnaw the bark from the trunk above
the ground, especially while there is
a deep snow and they are prevented
from getting green food on the ground.
For this reason the protectors should
extend at least 2 feet above ground
and 2 inches under ground.
FERTILIZERS HELP ORCHARDS
Appearance and Productiveness of the
Tree Is Best Evidence of
Its Needs.
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Fruit trees, like all other crops, are
helped by the right use of fertilizers,
hut the grow'er Is often at a loss to
know whether or not his trees need
fertilizing, and also to know what fer
tiliser to use to best advantage If any
Is to be used. The appearance and
previous productiveness of the trae Is
the bast evidence sf Us used*
INLAND NORTHWEST
Govori'jiK!n.t hunters In Nevada re.
cemly killed n IK)')-pound black bear. A
pack of wive-haircd fox tenders traile
him to bis den and lie was shot and
killed when within four feet of one
of tbe hunters.
■d
Mrs. George Alameda and small
daughter of Baker, Ore., narrowly ns
enped serious Injury when the cook
stove exploded, completely demolishing
Kitchen utensils and woodwork
were blown about the room. A frozen
waterhack in the stove is believed to
be die cause of the accident.
it.
Bread is lipihg sold at prices ranging
*rom 2 cents a loaf to nine loaves for
Jo cents, a: Great Falls, Mont., ns the
result of a bread war between local
bakeries. One store Is giving away a
loaf of bread with every 35-cent pur
chase.
One of the finest collection of ore
specimens in the interiuounitnin coun
try will be placed on exhibit in (lie
grade-floor rotunda of the Capitol with,
in the next thirty days. Some of the
specimens are parlcularl.v fine one*
and have been often; inquired for by
mining men to verify reports on Ida
ho's mines.
Eleven western states were repre
senter at the extension conference in
Portland January 30 to February 3.
Speakers from the extension service
of the department of agriculture, and
representatives from Idaho, California,
Washington, Montana. Wyoming, Utah,
Colorado, Nevada, Airzona, New Mexi
co and Oregon gathered for the three
days conference.
found."
■ mmediately from Nevada counties that
ilnave refused to appropriate any funds
for carrying on the work of extermin
ating predatory animals. At the last
' session of the legislature a new rul
e must find some means of rais
ing more money for school purposes,"
says Miss May Thompson of Missoula,
Mont., "if we want Montana schools to
continue to lead Hie nation in eflfi
deucy and organization. Because of
financial conditions, cuts are being
made wherever they can he made, but
we cannot lower our standards which
it has taken us years to build up.
Means to relieve the situation must he
All coyote hunters will he withdrawn
i ing was made whereby the counties
should appropriate what they saw fit
and the state would match this amount,
and the total amount would then be
matched by the federal goverment.
So far but seven counties have made
appropriations to carry on the work.
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| An international organization of
peace officers from the states of Wash
ington, Idaho ami Montana and the
Cunndiun provinces of Alberta and
British Columbia was organized at a
banquet of the Washington State Sher
iff's association, while in session at
Rellington. Wash. The new organiza
tion, known as the Northwest Associa
tion of Sheriffs and Police, is designed
I to bring about n more effect ive enforce
ment of the criminal law.
j Indications that the controversy rela
j five to tiie ownership of Malheur lake
! will soon l)c at rest wore seen by rep
; resentatives of the federal government
and the stale, who conferred recently.
'Representatives of both factions at the
; meeting, made It plain that both the
state and federal governments are pre
pared to make certain concessions with
a view to insuring the maintenance o"
Malheur lake as a bird reserve and tin
.development of Harney county getter
ally.
i ,l 'nd Wash., hi the county s plan
to litield a road down the north bank
Considerable opposition lias arisen in
of the Wll'ipa river from Raymond to
ja sett lenten: across t lie river from
^ )Utl ' Ben, ,\ ''T*'' 1 !* * ett, " rs ""
the other side of the river an outlet.
There is already a paved road down
the south side of the river, and it has
been suggested that a bridge across t.p"
river nt South Rend would be a fa •
cheaper way of giving an outlet to
families who now cross the river in
boats.
The war department is directed to
survey a military and post road from
St. Louis to Puget Sound in a hill in
troduced by Senator Jones of Washing
ton. The proposed highway would en
ter the norfhewest in the Bear river
valley of Idaho and would touch Poca
tello and Boise, Idaho, Huntington
and La Grande, Ore., Whitman, Wash.,
and following the Columbia rive:- val
ley tc the point where the Columbia
and Yakima rivers Intersect. It win'd
then run through the Naclies river val
ley, following the regon* trail through
Naches pess, from which point it would
run down the White river valley to
Pudget sound.
That prevailing high railroad rates
on cement, sand, gravel, lime, plaster
and brick are seriously hampering
building operations throughout the iu
terinountain country; are holding hack
the road-building program; are reduc
ing Uie earnings of the railroads them
selves and should be cut at least 20
per cent, was asserted before the in
terstate commerce commission by H.
W. 'Frickett, who appeared on behalf
of the governors of Utah, Idaho Wy
oming, Montana, Colorado, New Mexi
co and Arizona.
LEGISLATURE TO
BE INCREASED
Bingham County Is To
Have One More
Representative
The seventeenth session of the
Idaho state legislature which will be
gin January 8, 1923, will have 10!)
members, an increase of eleven rep
resentatives over the 1921 session.
Thesd figures, announced Saturday,
Jan. 28, by Robert O. Jones, secre
tary of state, who certifies to the
county auditor of each county ac
cording to law the number of repre
sentatives each county is entitled to
have in the legislature every two
years.
Quotas of Ten Raised
Ten counties of the state received
additional representation in the
house for the 1923 session. Canyon
county gained two members and all
the other nine gained one. Northern
counties whose representations was
increased are: Bonner, Idaho and
Nez Perce, The other counties are:
Ada, Bannock, Bingham and Bonne
ville, Cassia, Twin Falls and Canyon.
There is no change in the upper
house quota, which consists of forty
four senators.
Representation in the lower house
of the legislature . is based on the
total vote cast for all candidates for
governor at the last general election.
Each county in the state is entitled
to one representative for each 2500
votes and remaining fraction thereof
amounting to 1000 votes or more.
Two Sessions Compared
Following is a list of the counties
and the representation to which they
are entitled in the 1923 session com
pared with the 1921 session:
1921 >1923
Session Session
4 4 1 5
Ada .
Adams .
Bannock ....
Bear Lake ..
Benewah ....
Bingham ....
Blaine .
Boise .
Bonner
Bonnerville
Boundary ....
Butte .
Camas ..
Canyon .
Caribou .
Cassia .
Clark .
Clearwater ...
Custer .
Elmore .
Franklin .
Fremont .
Gem .
Gooding .
Jefferson .
Jerome .
Kootenai .
Latah .
Lemhi .
Lewis .
Lincoln .
Madison .
Minidoka .
Nez Perce.
1
1
2
3
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1
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2
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1
1
1
2
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2
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1
1
2
4
1
1
1
2
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1
1
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1
1
1
1
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. 2
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NEW GOODS
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New goods, whether they represent new
merchandise or new babies are always of
much interest to people.
Our store is rapidly taking on a spring like
atmosphere because of the daily arrival of
early new spring goods.
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We are very proud of our offerings and
believe you will agree with us that new goods
are heralders of new and prosperous times.
If we read
we think we
driven in his
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the hand writing correctly and
do, old
hole to stay.
gloom has been
man
J,
Prices for new goods in all lines permit us to sell
much cheaper than you might think and at a profit too.
f
Seeger-Bundlie Co.
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Broadway
"Everybody's Store
Blackfoot

j Farm Bureau Insti
! gating Campaign
Against Sparrov/s
I The English sparrow is every
where regarded as a pest. Not only
do they consume a large quantity
of grain but drive away other useful
and, from he farmers point of view,
valuable birds. Fortunately during
the winter time they are easy to
poison and every farmer should as
sist in reducing the number of this
pest. Poison bait may he prepared
as follows:
Dissolve one-eighth ounce of
strychnine sulphate in a scant cup
ful of boiling water and pour over
two pounds of oven dried wheat.
Mix thoroly and spread on paper to
dry. The poisoned wheat should he
scattered thinly and thoroly wher
ever the birds are likely to feed,
roofs, back yards, unused poultry
runs, hog lots, manure piles, fence
posts, etc., are favorable places to
put the bait.
Every precaution should be taken
not to endanger domestic animals.
Sparrows are very wise and soon
leave where danger lies so dead birds
should he removed as soon after
poisoning as possible.
The farm bureau is instigating a
campaign against sparrows by plac
ing poisoned wheat in the hands of
community leaders for distribution
in small quantities. Each commun
ity is requested to poison on one day,
designated by the community leader,
so that the work will he more effec
tive.
HOW BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
WON HIS GREAT SUCCESS
In the early days when young
Benjamin Franklin was struggling
to get a foothold in Philadelphia,
shrewd business men there predicted
—even when he was eating, sleeping,
and prirvtin gin one room—that he
had a great future because he was
working with all his might to get
up higher and hg carried himself in
a way that gave confidence.
Everything lie did was done so
well, with such ability, that it was
a prediction of very much larger
things. When he was only a jour
neyman printer he did his work so
much better than others and his sys
tem was so much better than others
about him and his system so much
superior even to his employer's, that
people predicted he would some day
have the business which went to that
firm—which he 'did.
No one gets very far, or expresses
great power, until he catches a
glimpse of his higher self—until he
feels that the divinity which is stir
ring within him, and which impels
him on the way of his ambition, is
an indication, a prophecy of his
ability to reach the ideal which
haunts him.—The New Success.
Oneida ......
Owyhee ....
Payette
Power .
Shoshone ..
Teton .
Twin Falls
Valley ......
Washington
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1

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Total .
.54
65
Friday and Saturday
Wm, Duncan in
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STEEL HEART '
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A ICy per cent attraction—give us more
like this.
Sunday and Monday
Dorothy Dalton in
THE IDOL OF THE NORTH
<<
Every one will enjoy this
T uesday—W ednesday—Thursday
Mabel Normajrid in
MOLLYO
Greater than "Mickey"
It will make you stand up in your seat.
Don't miss this.
SSN,'
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Statement of Recla
mation Association
(Continued from Page 1)
such a way as to seriously menace
the passage of the McNary-Smith
bill.
"When this association laid the
matter before representatives of
these settlers, it was found that they
had no purpose in mind excepting to
secure relief in a manner that would
not interfere with the genferal recla
mation program. There was especi
ally no desire to interfere with the
American Falls, which, irrespective
of any action on relief petitions,
would go thru if the power contracts
were approved and collections made
from the various districts and com
panies under i.t
"Aside from the false interpreta
tions that have been placed upon
these petitions, the fact remains that
if blanket relief were extended, the
reclamation fund would be deprived
of Its source of income to that ex
tent, and that is the situation the
friends of reclamation are undertak
ing to compose.
"We have every reason to believe
that the American Falls project will
he tied down within a short time!
so that its ultimate completion will
be assured, but there are many other
problems confronting this state and
the arid west that must be solved,
and the executive officers of this as
sociation trust that all proposed ac
tions of individuals and communi
ties will he given most careful con
sideration, to the end that we be not
defeated in our aims by community
division or sectional selfishness.
"This association is undertaking,
while promoting the interest of rec
lamation generally in our state, to
secure any possible relief for settlers,
but would deplore any actoin that
would not only defeat the granting
in some manner of legitimate relief,
but would impair and possibly de
feat the general reclamation pro
gram, which is bound up inseparably
with the McNary-Smith bill."
ESTRAY MARE PONY
*
There is at my place at Thomas,
Idaho, Blackfoot, R. F. D. No. 2, a
sorrel mare with roach mane, weighs
about 900 and has a brand that
might be I H 6 combined. Owner
can have same by proving property
and paying charges,
adv. 3-4-6
JAMES PALMER.
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HORSES - A)ST—REWARD
One yellow filly, three years old,
weight about 1200, branded
on left shoulder.
One bay filly, two years
old, white spot in forehead,
branded ....;....
on left thigh. One sorrel Ally
one year old, white feet and white
strip in forehead, branded on left
thigh same as one above. Said ' "
horses when last seen were on Grays
lake outlet . Will give $5 each for
recovery. C. H. Farnworth, Black
foot, R. F. D. No. 3. Phone 418R3. ■»
adv. 4-5
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