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The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1904-1932, October 05, 1922, Image 1

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$2 a Year
BLACKFOOT, IDAHO, OCTOBER 5, 1922
BINGHAM COUNTY
WINS STATE PRIZE
More People Attend
Fair at Blackfoot
Than at Boise
C. W. Bird with a collective ex
hibit of agricultural products took
fifty-five first and second premiums
at the state fair at Boise. He was
awarded first prize for county ex
hibit, first for artistic display and
grand champion exhibit. A total of
$288 was taken with these exhibits.
Mr. Berg says that our fair was
bigger and better in every respect
except the dialry department than
the state fair. The crowds here
were much larger than they were
there. The crowd in the grandstand
at Boise would not exceed more than
ISO people.
A reporter of one of the news
papers heard that there was to be
a committee from here to arrange
for the state fair to be held at Black
foot instead of Boise.
The agricultural awards won by
Bingham county were as follows:
Potatoes
Irish Cobbler—Third, Fred Stone,
A hordpoti
Netted • Gem—Third, Ronald
Campbell, Aberdeen.
Idaho gurals—First, T. S. Van
derford, Aberdeen. Second, Seth
Jenkins, Aberdeen.
Beets
Table Beets—First, C. W. Bird,
Second, Curtis Bird,
Blackfoot.
Blackfoot.
Sugar Beets—First, Earl Furniss,
Moreland.
Mangel
Baird, Blackfoot.
Half Suger-*—First, T. §. Vander
ford, Aberdeen.
Asa
W ortzel 1 —'Fir st,
Cabbage
Late—First, John Quinn, Basalt.
Red Pickling—First, John Quinn,
Basalt.
Pumpkins
Pie Pumpkins—First, Prof. Wal
ler, Basalt.
Squash
Summer Crookneck—First, C. W.
Bird, Blackfoot. Third, Mrs. A. E.
McClymonds, Aberdeen.
Weathersfleld—First, John Quinn,
Basalt.
Swwt Corn
Stoell Evergreen—First,
Quinn, Basalt.
John
Pop Corn
White Rice—First, C.
Blackfoot. White Pearl—First, Mr.
Williams, Shelley.
W. Bird,
Beans
White Navy—hirst, C. W. Bird,
Blackfoot.
Garden Wax—First, S. H. Davis,
Shelley. Second, Curtis Bird, Black
foot. Third, C. W. Bird, Blackfoot.
Garden Green Pod—First, C. W.
Second, Curtis
Bird, Blackfoot.
Bird, Blackfoot.
Table Peas—First, Curtis Bird,
Blackfoot.
Continued on page 8
DR. THURMAN
Chiropractor
Announces
I HAVE taken over the business, equipment and
practice of Drs. Flodquist & Brown, and in identi
fying myself with Blackfoot and its people, I desire to
say that I am a graduate of the Palmer school, of
Davenport, Iowa, have had six years experience
practitioner, spent half of last year in post graduate
work at Davenport, and moved from Driggs to Black
foot to get the benefit of the larger opportunities which
I think this community affords.
as a
, In my practice I find that a large number of
human ills can be cured by chiropractic adjustments, and
others cannot. When consulted, I make examination
and tell the person what I can do for the case. If I
If I think it is a
do not think I can cure it I say so.
for a surgeon and a hospital or an oculist or other
specialist, I advise the patient accordingly.
case
I am married, am thirty years old, consider Black
foot my home, my office hourse are from 9 to 6,
exenings by appointment. I have a lady attendant
at the office,I do not charge for examination, and
I invite your consideration when in need of a
doctor. My office is over the City Grocery on
North Main street, opposite the depot.
DR. O. M. THURMAN
Phone 551
Football Game At
Fair Grounds Friday
The Blackfoot high school foot
ball team will play a pick team, from
the faculty, alumni and some from
the city Friday afternoon for a
practice game,
scheduled to have a game Friday
with Aberdeen, but it was called off
because she could not get a team.
Blackfoot has a good team this year
and there are some good players in
the town so the game will be inter
esting and worth the trouble for
anyone to come out and boost for
the boys.
Blackfoot was
* 5 *
SCHOOLS CLOSE
ONLY ONE WEEK
Pupils Will be Excused
to Work in Potato
and Beet Fields
During the past two weeks there
has been considerable agitation for
closing school during the week pre
ceding teachers institute, but the
board of trustees after careful con
sideration and study of conditions,
decided that it would not be feasible
to dismiss the entire school when
probably only one out of every five
students would assist in the potato
harvest. It costs approximately
$600 per day to run our schools
which in addition to having four
fifths of the pupils turned loose and
doing nothing would hardly justify
our closing school.
It was decided, however, to per
mit all pupils who will assist in the
potato harvest and who will -obtain
job, to remain out of school during
the week of October 9 to 14 for that
purpose. Special arrangement will
be made for those pupils to receive
special help on the work they missed
during those two weeks. Sickness
only being an excuse for the exten
sion of the time for making up this
work.
The pupils and patrons of the
Blackfoot schools are asked to take
carefdl notice of this action on the
part of the board.
a
*
Mauritania Escapes
Fate of the Titanic
The Mauritania escaped the fate
of the Titanic recently while cross
ing the Atlantic. An iceberg lay
across her path, standing ninety
feet above water and some 700 feet
below the surface and 600 feet long.
The revenue cutter assigned to look
out serVice for icebergs sent out
wireless messages telling of the loca
tion of the berg, and unlike the
Titanic, the Mauretania heeded the
call, shifted her course and passed
ten miles to the south of it, passing
it in a very dark night,
that distance they felt the chill of
the cold air passing from the berg.
The Mauretania had 1550 people
on board, just about the number
lost by the Titanic tliat fateful night
when Captain Smith gave the order
to "hold her to her course," and
went to bed, knowing that an ice
berg lay ahead. __
Even at
TALENTED ARTIST
TO APPEAR HERE
held
pointed
fill
tion
for
A
year's
had
dates,
their
Falls
paign
Will Be One of Four
Concerts West of
Mississippi
During the week of teachers Insti
tute, the people of Blackfoot will
have the opportunity of hearing one
of the world's foremost artists of the
Wednesday
operatic stage, for on
evening, October 18, Miss Evelyn
Scotney, "The world's most famous
Coloratura Soprano'' will render the
program for the main attraction of
institute week. She will be assisted
in this program by Maximilian Rose,
a rising young violinist \ and Elvin
Schmitt, a brilliant young New York
pianist.
Never has such an artist appeared
in Blackfoot. Never have the people
of this community had the opportun
ity to hear such an artist as Miss
Scotney. During the past few years,
considerable numbers of Blackfoot
people have driven to Idaho Falls to
witness productions given at the
Colonial. Now is the opportunity
given that not only the few may
hear, but that all may hear the most
wonderful artist ever appearing in
the upper Snake river valley. Miss
Scotney will appear in such cities as
Spokane, Salt Lake, Seattle and
Portland as one of the head liners
Black
Twin
from
tion
with
porary
the
to
should
was
in musical circles this year,
foot was able to secure her only
after much urging, and promising to
fill the tabernacle for the per
formance. Citjzens, let us fulfill our
promise.
Miss Evelyn Scotney is a native of
Australia, but since coming to
America, she has become thoroly
Americanized. So thoroly American
has she become that instead of going
into the mountains to spend the
summer months, she has remained
in her apartment in New York City
in order to spend her afternoon at
the polo grounds watching the great
American game baseball, never miss
ing a single game played by the
Giants or Yankees during the entire
This stamps her a real
was
ridge,
under
thru
for
not
of
chase
tion
to
fore
they
canay
the
prior
in
jury.
state
in
a
ing
tion,
final
year.
American.
Miss Scotney was discovered by
Mme Melba at a song festival held
in Melbourn, Australia at which
festival she was awarded the title of
Woman Soprano of
She was immediately
"Champion
Australia.'
engaged by Mme Melba to be tne
chief singer at the great reception to
be given the following week in
honor of the late Lord Kitchener,
who had then just landed in Aus
tralia. At this reception Miss
Scotney won another great triumph,
which brought her an introduction
to the great Kitchener himself, who
despite his reputation as a woman
hater, congratulated the young lady
and said that he hoped some day to
hear her sing in that great song
pavilian, "Convent Garden" in
London. This wish has been grati
fied, but Lord Kitchener did not
hear her again, having in the mean
time lost his life in the late war.
These two triumphs of Miss on
Scotney caused Mme Melba to Insist
upon placing her under the tutelage
of Mme Marches!, the world's most
famous singing teacher and the dis
of the great Melba herself.
with
B.
just
coverer
Miss Scotney has decided not to
confine her work to operatic stage as
she considers that field too narrow,
but is spending a considerable part
of her time in concert tours. She
says "Opera stars become queer and
considered by the public. I
want to be queer and I intend
are so
never
never to be.' During her tours she
says, "One meets the most culti
vated charming people of every city,
one dines at their homes, one gets to
know them intimately, and in this
way one's own life is broadened and
deepened. Art, aftej all, should
have a close connection with every
day life."
Dean of Converse College, Spart
anburg, S. C., says:
"Miss Evelyn Scotney had a bril
liant success at the recent Spartan
burg festival, surpassing any others
in the delight of her singing gave
and the charm of her perosnality.
Miss Scotney is unspoiled, unaf
Her
To
very
this
as
as
that
ing
the
to
of
fected, and is truly artistic,
lovely voice, of high tessiture and
great range is produced with ease
and naturalness that characterized
Mme Melba's, though this is the
more beautiful voice.
"Miss Scotney's name is still on
the lips of all who heard her, to an
extent practically unknown hereto
fore."
Be sure to hold this date for Miss
This concert will be the
Scotney.
big event of the season. Every per
in Blackfoot should attend.
Don't fail to obtain a ticket.
son
*
MARKET REPORT
Wholesale
$ .30
Eggs .
Butter .
Butter fat (sour cream)
Butter fat (sweet cream)
Wheat No. 1, per cwt.
Wheat No. 2, per cwt.
Oats, per cwt.
Barley, per cwt.
Potatoes .
Hogs, per lb.
Sters, per lb.4%c to .05%
Lambs,- per lb.8c to .10
Cl^jckens .12c to .16
Coal, per ton at yards, lump.. 11.25
Soft coal per ton at yards. 10.75
Eggs, retail .
Butter, retail ....
.37
.34
.37
1.20
1.16
1.05
a
1.00
.40
.09
.35
.40
Republicans Met in
Blackfoot Saturday
The Republican central committee
held a meeting last Saturday and ap
pointed Chris Anderson of Shelley to
fill the vacancy made by the resigna
tion of Soren Yorgesen as candidate
for the house of representatives.
A levy of 6 per cent of the first
year's salary or the expected salary
had been levied against the candi
dates, and most of them had sent in
their checks.
Senator Clency St. Clair of Idaho
Falls and Mr. Adams of the state
committee were present and made
suggestions for conducting the cam
paign in the county.
ful
and
more
fore.
ter
the
on
fall.
next
this
had
less
and
self
the
out
wlil
+
INJUNCTION FILED
AGAINST DISTRICT
Twin Falls Judge Sets
Hearing for October
6—More Delay
An order of tfie district court here
recently interposed to prevent
Twin Falls county commissioners
from calling an election on the
creation of the Snake river irriga
tion district proposed in connection
with financing the American Falls
reservoir project. The order, a tem
porary injunction, provided for
hearing in court October 6, at which
the commissioners will be required
to show cause why the injunction
should not be made permanent. It
the instance of
is
was
was issued at
Thomas Costello, L. L. Brecken
ridge, E. J. Malone, holders of land
under the Twin Falls canal system,
thru their attorneys, S. L. Hodgin.
Plaintiffs allege that the petition
for the election which the commis
sioners have been considering since
August 28 is insufficient and does
not comply with gtate law because
various areas in Twin Falls, Jerome,
Gooding, Bingham, Bonneville and
Madison counties included in the
proposed district are noncontiguous.
Sufficiency.of the petition also is at
tacked on grounds that the purpose
of the proposed district is not to pur
chase or operat established irriga
tion systems, but only to issue bonds
to buy supplemental water rights.
Canal companies whose lands are
included in the district have hereto
fore contracted for these water
rights, but ,have defaulted pay
ments. Plaintiff's allege also that
they own lands under the Twin Falls
canay system and that the bonds of
the proposed district would be a
prior lien on their lands, resulting
in their great and irreparable in
jury. They allege farther tiyit full
filment of the district's purpose
"would result in wasting large
quantities of public waters of the
state by placing the same on lands
in Twin Falls county that are al
ready irrigated and which have
ample and sufficient water right."
Plaintiffs posted $1000 bond
shortly before summons were served
the commissioners, they received
a letter from Guy Flenner, manag
ing director of the Idaho reclama
tion, asking for postponement of
final action on the petition for the
that the association had not
By
on
reason
completed its work in connection
with the subject, and stating that E.
B. Shepherd, president of Twin Falls
North Side Land & Water Co., had
just returned from Chicago and
Minneapolis, where he had received
assurance of ready sale for the pro
posed district's bonds.—Exchange.
to
as
I
to
*
NOTICE
Blackfoot, Idaho.
September 28, 1922
To the School Boards of Bingham
County.
Greeting:
The potato and beet crops in
Bingham county are reported to be
very heavy this year and we believe
this to be true.
Fnancial matters among farmers,
as well as among other business
are not at present as favorable
men,
as we coul wish they were.
These conditions existing, we fell
that the schools should fully co
operate with the farmers in assist
ing with the gathering in of the
crops. By this method, each will
help himself and others as well.
Many pupils may thus earn their
winter clothing and perhaps assist
the parents beside.
Our institute will be held from
October 16-20 inclusive and I would
suggest that an additional Harvest
week (or two if necessary) be given
to at least the larger pupils at that
time for the purpose of assisting
with the crops.
The time could be made up by one
of the various ways that have been
suggested at other times.
Sincerely,
on
an
the
.30
.10
.16
.37
.34
GRACE FAULCONER,
County Superintendent of Schools.
.37
*
VISITING DAUGHTER
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Weyerts ar
rived here Friday and will visit for
a few days with their daughter Mrs.
Walter F. Thomas.
Mr. and Mrs. Weyerts have been
visiting in Oregon and Washington
and are now on their way to their
home in Denver.
.40
.09
.35
.40
STORE YOUR SEED
POTATOES NOW
have
in
with
The
ries
a
car
slips
ding,
auto
in
Certified Seed Will Be
Scarce Before
Spring
Many farmers have been success
ful with potato seed plots this year
and will have higher yielding plots,
more free from disease than hereto
fore. The project "producing bet
ter seed potatoes on every farm by
the seed plot method,'' was started
on a large scale last year by County
Agent Stephens and has grown in
favor with the farmers this year. A
large percentage of the careful
growers have seed plots which they
rogue carefully, during the growing
season and hill select from in the
fall. Those who have seed plots
which have been carefully rogued
must not fail to follow up their work
with hill selections to be used for
next year's seed plot,
this week by digging hills that have
had a large spreading vine growth
with this stalks and eight or more
marketable potatoes.
Due to the fact that every field in
Bingham county has been more or
less affected by Mosaic disease,
some as high as 99 per cent, good
seed stock will be scarce next spring
and every farmer should insure him
self of sufficient good seed for next
year's planting.
A large number of fields have
been inspected for certification, but
only a comparatively few will pass
the final inspection. I would advise
that wherever possible farmers de
siring this seed purpchase enough
out of the field this fall for a few
acres planting. Names of growers
having seed eligible for certification
wlil be available at the farm bureau
office in the near future.
next.
Hill select
or
on
and
the
we
of
and
is
all
the
Potato Leak is the name given a the
disease of the potatoes where there
is a watery rot. It is caused by
fungi that live in the soil. One of
these fungi is the common black
mold of bread. If potatoes are the
roughly handled so that there are to
bruises or the skin is broken, a 1
means of entering the tuber is pro
vided the fungi. When such in
fected tuebrs are placed in cars, the
fungi begin growing and cause the
water rot. It is not unusual to have
entire car loads of potatoes arrive in
the big markets effected with this
leak.
Loss Thru Disease and Bruises
Farmers are not the only ones in
terested in potato diseases and their
control. The problem must also be
met by transportation companies,
commission men, wholesale and re
tailers and finally the consumer.
There are diseases where Infec
tion takes place in the field and
finds
growth in cars that are improperly
ventilated. Such diseases mean that
transportation companies or whole
sale men lose money on shipments.
By properly handling farm crops in
the field at the time of harvesting it
will greatly help to prevent such
loss. Other diseases are caused by
improper transportation and storage
conditions.
conditions for
favorable
to
By properly handling and sorting
out all tubers with the skin broken
or bruised, it has been found possi
ble to eliminate from 96 to 98 per
cent of this disease. It is absolutely
unsafe to ship tubers that have the
small second growth nubbins broken
off.
POTATO SITUATION
The potato crop thruout the
country sems to be a poor yield, in
cluding Idaho. Those who have har
vested in this locality are disap
pointed in the yeld, but the quality
is good.
Similar reports come from many
parts of the country excepting that
in many places the quality is not
very good. Much of the California
crop is said to be very inferior. A
Blackfoot man on the ground con
firms this report and says they are
and show much
in
be
sappy, soggy
The local market is still weak at
40 cents.
Students from the schools are
signing up to go out on Friday even
ing and remain for two weeks, pick
ing up potatoes for farmers who can
hire help.
-
William Bartlett
Democratic nominee for
County Superintendent of
Public Instruction
of Bingham County
I promise, if elected, to co-operate with you, serve you
efficiently and save you money.
YOUR VOTE W ILL BE APPRECIATED
■r:.
j
New Sporting Boat
for Local People
Frank Berryman and C. S. Beebe
have purchased a new tin boat built
in three sections, that fit together
with deadlalr spaces in the ends.
The boat is twelve feet long and car
ries two or three persons. It weighs
a little over 100 pounds, and can be
carried on the running board of a.
car by merely attaching two
brackets that come with the boat. It
slips into and out of the brackets
almost as quickly as a roll of bed
ding, so that hunters can travel by
auto one minute and by boat the
The boat costs |90 delivered
in Blackfoot by freight or $94 by
express.
next.
TELL TEACHERS
OF THE PROGRAM
Help Them to Get the,
Benefit of Every
thing Provided
Save your copy of the local paper
or the extra one you get, and lay it
on the dresser or center table for the
teachers in your home.
Call their attention to the fashion
show being put on in their honor.
Tell them of the dance to be given
especially for the teachers, the card
party for those who do not dance,
and the weinie roast for all of them.
Tell them that our home girl* and
women are going to remain away
from the dance this time so that our
guests, the teachers, can have all the
there is on the floor and all
the partners there are. Last year
we overlooked coming to an under
standing among ourselves, and the
local people flocked in and filled the
floor and the guests sat it out most
of the evening at the dance given
especially for them. We were quite
crude then add we Should redeem
ourselves this year.
Inform the teachers of
musical treat we shall have on
Thursday
donna
Scotne who was discovered by Melba
and put in training in Europe, and
is making good in the great cities
all these years In competition with
the best. She has four engage
ments west of the Missouri river for
October, and Blackfoot Ib one of
them. The other three are Salt
Lake, Portland and Seattle, and
Blackfoot is putting up $600 and ad
vertising expenses to get her at the
tabernacle for Thursday evening, tor
the teachers and the rest of us.
There will be a pianist and a
violinist, but Madam Scotne is the
star. Last year the Blackfoot Com
mercial club bought 800 tickets for
the teachers for their free admission
to the musical, and some of the
1 teachers gave away these gifts and
room
the
evening — the prima
from Australia, Madam
nearly a hundred of our local people
walked in on teachers' tickets,
thereby taking nearly $100 out of
the pockets of the guarantors. -The
Commercial club wanted all the
teachers to get in free if they cared
to go, but they did ont wish to ad
mit the local folks free on teachers'
tickets.
When teachers' tickets
were presented by local people who
were not teaching, it was a little
awkward for the doorkeeper to
make objections, and all were ad
mitted, but it did not suit.
(Continued on Page 8)
DID YOU
KNOW?
that latent eye defects cause
deep seated nervous derange
ments in the form of dizziness,
headaches, stomach trouble
and general weariness, that
can be relieved by having the
eyes properly attended by one
whose original methods cor
rect the latent trouble that is
often overlooked by others.
Dr.H.H.Scarborough
AT THE EOCLES HOTEL
TUESDAY, OCT. 10

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