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The Twin Falls times. [volume] (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, August 06, 1908, Image 1

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. The Times is the official paper of the city of
Twin Falls.
The Times is the official paper of Twin
Falls county.
y
VOL. IV, NO. 20
TWIN FALLS TWIN FALLS COUNTY, IDAHO, THURSDAY. AUGUST 6, 1908.*:
SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR
$35,000 ICE
PUNT EOR CITY
local Men Interest Eastern
Capital in Industry.
•r ! ••:
WORK OF EXCAVATING WILL
COMMENCE NEXT WEEK
Ice and Fuel Company Incorporates
With R. II. Secbeck, F. N. Wardwell
of This City Among the Principal
Stockholders.
(
v
Ground Is to be broken in a few
days for the construction of a cold
storage and Ice making plant In Twin
Falls. The land is already purchas
ed and the company which has been
Incorporated, started" out with a cap
italization of $35.000. The name and
business of the firm, as shown by the
articles of Incorporation will be The
Pioneer Ice and Fuel Co., Limited,
chartered for the purpose of making
and selling Ice, fuel and distilled wat
ers and to engage in a general cold
storage business.
The stock of the company Is divid-
ed into 350 shares of a par value of
one hundred dollars each. The in-
corporators are Fred W. Kellogg, of
St. Louis, Mo., Otis W. . Gatchell, of
Minneapolis, Minn., Fred N. Wardwell,
and H. H. Seebeck of Twin Falls.
Both Mr. Seebeck and Mr. Wardwell
are too well known in this city to need
any Introduction. Mr. Kellogg is
from St. Louis, where he is the chief
owner and .manager of one of the
largest and most successful cold stor-
age plants in that city. He has spent
many years In the business and knows
It thoroughly.
- «Mr, Gatchell is known all through
Minnesota as the mose successful me
chanical engineer of the state. He has
made and designed many successful
plants for cold storage, and has made
a close study of this branch cl tip
neering. He has the )>lans.all com
pleted for the "Pioneer" plant of Twin
Falls and work will be started as soon
as Mr. Wardwell returns from the
east, where he is looking up the nec
essary machinery.
■ The company expects to have the
plant which will be located on a spur
of the railroad, In operation by De
cember and will stfpply Ice in any
quantity to the surrounding towns as
well as to the local trade.
Such a plant is much needed here
and *111 prove welcome.
Mr. Wardwell, with whom the idea
started and Mr. Seebeck are to be
commended for the enterprise they
have shown In this particular project.
HARRIMAN WANTS PROTECTION
Declares People Should Be Willing to
Pay Higher Freight Rates.
E. H. Harriman held a conference
In Chicago Monday with various heads
of railroads in which he was inter
ested.
ed by J. C. Stubbs, traffic director,
Julius Krutschmidt, director of main
tenance, S. M. Felton, president of
the Mexico Central railroad, and E.
P. Ripley, president of the Santa Fe.
At luncheon later at the Chicago Club,
Mr. Harriman met J. J. Mitchel, presl
The conferences were attend
rr
100 BOYS' SUITS
S CHOOL will soon begin again a* 1
the boys will need something bet
ter than their vacation suits of
overalls. We find ourselves over
stocke|*!witti Boys' School Suijs and
dois thenv out at lessthaimost
Thie means a big saving ta#arfnts
ftp takea<jygntanre of this!
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dent of the Chicago & Northwestern
railroad and several officers of the
Union Pacific.
The reporters to whom he talked
before going to the club, Mr. Har
riman declared he was opposed to the
Hepburn bill or any railroad regula
tion, unless it carried with it provis
ions for publicity and regulation and
protection for the railroads.
"The Hepburn act in itself would
not be harmful had it been coupled
with Borne legislation for protection,
as well as regulation," said Mr. Harrl
man, "this I stated to the president
as far back as 1905. I also wrote
to Mr. Taft about that same year. I
said then that I favored regulation
and publicity if coupled with pro
tection so as to permit the movement
of traffic along the line of least re
sistance and least cost. This can only
be accomplished by co-operation be
tween the railroads and the govern
ment. Unless the government is will
ing to grant one, It taouli^iot en
force the other."
As to Freight Rates.
Preceeding his departure from Chi
cago for the west tonight E. H. Har
rlman talked briefly of the probability
of a general increase in freight rates
in the United States.
"The American people aught to be
willing to pay the railroads a proper
compensation for a proper transpor
tation service," he said, "such as we
are now performing, bpt for it we are
not receiving an adequate return.
"If the railroads are to go on ex
tending their lines, Improving those
which are now operating and provid
ing new equipment to take care of the
country's business they must have
in
Finder return to J.
8-6 tf
more revenue.
* Against Straight Increase.
"I am not in favor of a cold, cal
culating, cruel and horizontal
crease In rates. I am not a traffic
manager and 1 do not know much
about such things, but I know that
there Is a proper way to go about a
thing and that there is a bungling
way."
Mr. Hariman seemed to favor a
general re-adjustment of freight tar
iffs rather than a general increase.
He believed that many rates are too
low and should be raised but he was
opposed to a straight 10 per cent in
crease In the carrying charges for all
commodities.
"Is there to be an increase In
freight rates? He was asked.
"How can I tell?" was the reply, ac
companied by a despairing wave of
his hands.
"Well if there Is to be no increase
In freight rates, will there be a de
cline of wages?" was the next ques
tion.
Wage Question.
I don't care to talk about wages,"
"But the rail
said Mr. Harriman.
road laborer is in the same position
that the railroads should be In.
Is entitled to all he can get for his
services, provided he gives the very
best service that lies In him."—States
He
man.
A Correction.
In our last week's Issue, owing to
a typographical error In speaking of
the new scales being put in at the
elevator we said the same would cost
$4.00 when it should have read $4000.
to
of
E.
Lost.
A key ring containing four or five
keys and an Overland beer opener.
Finder please return to the Times of
fice.
Lost
Fish basket, reel, flybook containing
files and etc..between Rock Creek
and Twin Falls.
E. White In Commercial Bank Build
ing. Reward.
HANSEN TOWNSITE
OPENED YESTERDAY
wenty-five Lots Sold During
First Hour.
THREE BIUCK STORES TO BE
ERECTED THIS YEAR
Two Blocks in Center of Townsltc
Set Aside for Park—Trees Set Out
Last Year Thriving—Inducements
Made to Business Enterprises.
On Wednesday, August 5th, the Han
sen Townsite was successfully launch
ed. There was no bottle of wine to
break over the bows of the craft as
she slid quietly into the municipal cur
rent, for nothing stronger than good
coffee and a straight brand of lemon
ade was to be found In the locker. No
particular ceremonies attended the
event, which satisfied a long felt want
on the part of the thrifty and pros
perous community In that section of
the country. Mr. S. T. Hamilton made
a short statement of the work of the
town site company upto date and for
the future promised, on behalf of the
company, co-operation on a fair busi
ness basis, with every man and every
influence for the best development of
Hansen. . .
The sale of lots was conducted un
der a system of numbers by which
those first drawn were entitled to first
choice from a marked town plat. Miss
Bertha Crater was chosen to draw
numbers from the box. By this
method all were satisfied and in the
course of an hour twenty-five lots
were selected. This is a very good
beginning as already there is estab
lished and In operation upon the town
plat a lumber yard, store, restaurant
and a blacksmith shop. Mr. Dixon
who has the contract from the town
site company for three brick store
rooms, now in course of erection on
Main street, will at once prepare for
the manufacture of brick on land ad
joining the town site. Mr. Dixon is
a practical brick maker of much ex
perience and a good article Is as
sured from his kiln.
The scale of prices on the Hansen
lots is said to be lower than in any
of the towns on the Twin Falls tract,
and under the policy of the company,
a lot will be deeded free to each
church organization when prepared to
build.
The townsite Is a beautiful one and
the trees set out last year along all
the streets are making a fine growth.
Two blocks have been set apart for
park purposes and will be used for no
other. One full block will be deeded
to the school district. The main
streets have been graded and public
water supply provided by the con
struction of a large filtered cistern.
In this has been In stalled a "town
pump" around which, until such time
as the growth of the town will justify
a newspaper, the gossip of the com
munity will circulate and to which all
municipal complaints may be charged.
Negotiations are under way for the
Introduction of other lines of busl
J. ness, which within a short time will
provide the people of Hansen with all
tf the conveniences of a modern city.
to
of
THURSDAY. AUGUST 6, 1908.*:
COUNOL JARS UP
WAHR COMPANY
Kern
and
ous
that
a
Falls
and
pion
They
mick
back
easy
get
Heads of Waterworks Company
FRANCHISE GRANTED FOR SHORT
RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY
City to Be Given Extra Police Protec
tion at Night—Contracts Awarded
For Delinquent Sidewalk Construc
tion and Rcplanking of Viaduct.
the
and
sel
of
the
Monday evening a rather interesting
meeting was pulled off by the city
council in regular -session. First and
foremost the waterworks company
through its representative was touch
ed up for delinquencies In the system,
and after listening to the explanation
of Mr. Ramsay, who was not author
ized to promise anything for the com
pany. the council ordered that Messrs.
Critchlow and Filer of Salt Lake, prin
cipal stockholders, appear in person
before the council on or before August
15th to make some deflnate promise
of better service. During the report
of the superintendent it was virtually
admitted that the water from the ca
nal has been delivered to the city with
out filtration because of some de
fect in the first filter put in.
George D. Aiken was granted a fran
chise for a right of way for railroad
through block 160 to connect ware
house with O. S. L. track.
Owing to the large territory to be
covered in the city and because of
the numerous petty thiefts of late, an
extra night man was added to the po
lice force.
The contract for building the side
walks for the delinquent property
owners was awarded to E. A. Moon
for 32% cents per running foot.
P. B. Curtis was given the contract
for replankng viaduct, the bid being
$424.84.
derod built across the lateral on 8th
avenue on the "north side of Sho
shone street.
An ordinance was passed fixing the
salaries of each of the commissioners
for the sewer district No. 2 at $C5 per
month.
George B. Fraser was appointed to
succeed C. D. Thomas as member of
Sewer district No. 1, and to assist In
making pro rata rebate to taxpayers
from surplus funds of that district.
The annual appropriation notice
was approved and ordered published.
is
to
all
for
of
all
in
of
ion
ed
A foot bridge was also or
a
GALLIHER GETS MONEY BACK
Twin Falls Man Aided by tlie Denver
Police.
"I was told that the man I was bet
ting on was the best wrestler ln», the
United States and that nobody could
throw him," said JameB Galliher, liv
eryman, of Twin Falls, Idaho, this
morning, as he started to tell how he
had lost $5000 in cash at an old game.
"When I came to Denver I had a
draft for $5000. They told me that
sports only bet cash money, and so
I cashed the draft. I couldn't tell
you where the match was pulled off.
but my man lost, I think I could find
the place if I looked about town
for a while."
Galliher admits that he was under
the impression that he had a sure
thing when he arrived In Denver with
his roll of money.
John Kern, aged 30- years, and
George McLaughlin, Si years, are un
der arrest. McLaughlin had In Kla
pockets cash to the amount of $1436
and a certified check rot $6500.- His
partner had $1270.
The wresting match was held yes
terday afternoon In a private room.
"There were present McLaughlin
and McCormick, the principals,'' says
Galliher, "George Cortland, referee, a
Millionaire
in and Mr.
fellow they Introduced aa
Frick of Pitaburg and Mr. Hi
Collins.
Burst Blood
iseL
I threw ta*
_ they 'wrestled for
about four minutes, Tbo& they
■Urtedat It agata-ond AUO ormlck got
a hold on McLaughlta and raised him
up like he was going to throw him
over hie head. ^thea homefKtng
cracked like a 42 oallber taptol. and
McLgdSblta began ta 'J M MM ifcMood
all wer the other h
other man a
in
_ „ ,.__ w yeUefjjpr
ip go for aerator.
- -rytaArramid
so
w
n
ealfte
ne, oi conns
ey
t
got,'
I
tO H*
ti-,
Wi
Kern appeared in Twin Falls, Idaho,
and made it their business to become
acquainted with Galliher, a prosper
ous liveryman. He showed no par
ticular Interest when lie was informed
that McLaughlin had a reputation as
a wrestler. Galliher says that a soda
manufacturer named Benoit of Twin
Falls is an old friend of McLaughlin,
and vouched for him as being a cham
pion wrestler as well.
They unfolded to Galliher a scheme
whereby they could enrich him $5000.
They explained that some Pittsburg
capitalists, including Millionaire
Frick, had a wrestler, named McCor
mick in Denver, whom they would
back with any amount of money. Mc
Laughlin declared that it would be
easy picking for him to defeat Mc
Cormick. They finally managed to
get Galliher to come to Denver after
inducing him to get a letter of credit
from his bank.
Millionaires in Plenty.
The three men registered here at
the Shirley, where they met Cortland
and "Millionaire Frick" and other
"Pittsburg sports."
The prisoners assured Chief Arm
strong that the match was "on the
square" and that McLaughlin, in his
efforts to win, had burst a blood ves
sel in his throat.
The certified check for $6500 taken
from McLaughlin bears the signature
of Assistant Cashier McLaughlin of
the Capitol National Bank, and the
police say it is genuine.—Denver Post.
The true version of the wonderful
fairy tale in the Post Is shorter and
somewhat less sensational.
Galliher left this city a short time ago
for Casper, Wyoming, for the purpose
of buying cattle. Owing to a more at
tractive proposition coming up, not
all of his money was expended and
in company with a man by the name
of Brown, Mr. Galliher went to Den
ver, and did venture $500 on the fake
wrestling contest, while his compan
ion staked a like sum. When the
affair was discovered to be a fake
the men went to the police and enter
ed complaint against the principals
with the result that the $1000 was re
turned. Mr. Galliher returned home
Sunday from his trip and was much
surprised to see the account of his
great loss.
Mr.
BRICK PLANT SHUT DOWN
Accident Causes Temporary Cessation
Of Output.
Buhl, August 6,1908.
Dell Goodnight left here Sunday for
his old home, Vancouver, Washington.
He owns a good ranch north of Buhl
which he will return to some day in
the near future.
Robert N. Bell, State Mining In
spector, was in Buhl Monday looking
after his investments here.
N. C. Ware returned to Buhl Monday
from Seattle where he has been for
two weeks on business. He sold some
Buhl land while away and boosted
for Buhl and surrounding country.
Mr. A. L. Fredenhagen and Miss
Anna Ltndstom went over to- Snake
river Sunday to view the beautiful
scenery of Riverside and Thousand
Springs.
L. G. Johnson visited at Riverside
Sunday. "Wonder why."
Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Hopkins, Mr. and
Mrs. T. W. Snodgrass and their son,
Dewey, left Buhl last Thursday for
a three weeks visit in the Yellowstone
national park.
R. W. Gager has been on the sick
list for a few days but Is able to be
around again.
Mr. Aldrich who has been here some
time working for Heath & Bennett
has bought their blacksmith business.
E. B. Williams has nought 40 acres
of land near Buhl, from Mr. Wyatt.
Mr. And Mrs. James Price lost their
'little -nineteen months old child last
week which was burled In the Odd
Fellows cemetery.
The show here M
Dummer Concert
about 100 persons, who enjoyed it very
much.
Mr. and Mte. Tom Holmes and R.
B. Howard were at Clear Lake Sunday
plcnictng.
F. A. Hutto, county attorney was in
Buhl Monday on -business.
The Buhl Pressed Brick Co., had
an accident Monday, breaking a cast
ing which caused them to close down
tor a short time.
RoSs Ellison's brother Is visiting
with» him a few days.
a
a
day nlght(Angel
o.) was attended
After the Judge's Mosey.
Judge Smith with Oscar Harrison
had a little episode Jast week that
left a bit of uncertainty in " '
as to Just h»w largo a ti
run. The two men "
ln fronttw «hgjpgnU
tag until abouvTOM
16 get ooolsd oCf JNpö
ly after midnight four tough looking
men approached Mr. Smith and Inform
ed him that * woman had been h»*
tan runaway ihnrikta u jp g a luinl ■ rad » ,
el assistance. He Juge aM Hr.
quy hgd
I court burns
as
it«
in
taon said they
■ doing so, sad
»Ivor. All the. trpfc-idopra tn.'ra;
the. «MMhgiljWM
t
tat
a. but the
SUICIDE FROM
DESPONDENCY
Chris
Anderson, of Cardston
Blows Brains Out.
DEATH OF UNFORTUNATE MAN
INSTANTANEOUS
Anderson Was Recovering from an
Attack of Delirnm Tremens and Was
Still Under Physicians Care—Cor
ouor's Inquest Held.
I I
After a protracted spree which end
ed In delirium tremens, Chris Ander
son a guest of James Galliher commit
ted suicide yesterday morning. Mr.
Anderson who lived at Cardston, Can
ada, is an old friend of the family and
came to this city with Mr. Galliher
last Sunday for a brief visit. The
man had been drinking heavily and
sometime Tuesday a slight attack of
tremens set in which caused Mr. Gal
liher to keep watch of him during
the night and place" him undeç a
physician's care. Wednesday morn
ing Anderson had so far recovered as
to seem perfectly rational and said
that his head felt much better. About
nine o'clock Mr. Anderson went out
Into the kitchen and told Mrs. Galli
her that he .didn't believe he would get
over the attack and told her that If
anything happened to notify his broth
er at Cardston. He returned to the
bedroom and in a moment Mrs. Galli
her heard the report of a gun and
rushed screaming out of doors to call
Mr. Galliher at the livery barn across
the street.
When the men reached the house
the Buicide was lying on the bed with
a big hole in his left temple where
the bullet had entered and a fright
ful wound In the skull where it passed
out. The revolver was lying by his
side and showed beyond a doubt that
It was a case of suicide. Coronor
Hunt was Immediately called and the
body was removed to the undertak
ing rooms where the inquest was held.
The verdict of the coronqr's jury In
the above case is as follows:
We the jury in the inquest of Chris.
A. Anderson find that the deceased
came to his death by a gun shot
wound Inflicted by bis own hand with
intent to committ suicide.
Signed
C. F. Duvand, James H. Day, W.H.
Weaver, C. C. Knorr, James Galliher,
James A. Galliher, Jr., and Dr J. P.
Morgan.
PUMPS FOR MINIDOKA PROJECT
Contract for Pumping Plant Equip
ment Let.
Project Engineer Camp has received
Information to the effect that con
tracts have been awarded covering all
of the machinery for the power plant
at the dam and the pumping plants
on the south side. The machinery Is
to be delivered within tour months
and will be installed under the direc
tion of the contractors.
The electric generators are of the
alternating current, vertical turbine
type, designed to deliver ^ a three
phase, 60 cycle, alternatlng'current of
23000 volts and 1200 kilowatts, equiva
lent to 1600 horse power. One of
the generators will be installed at
once and another before Che first of
next June. The generators will be
of $6 percent efficiency and wll| be
able to carry an overload of 50 per
cent for short periods.
Theee generators will be so ar
ranged that, they will revolve on the
same
shafe upon which the p
water wheel revolves. s The ' thi
will be perpendicular, extending fr«
the lower floor of the power bowse :
the Moor shove, the turbins to
attached On the lower floor and J
generator on the floor above. f
water m D be conveyed through I
steel penstock Into the turbine
thenoe discharged into the river
low. -
The contract calls for two exit*
the vertical type and a swttehlra.
capacity t« central
» ,
of
geuei spam. .
Ug are the spedH
Wk plants: -
?No. h, first Ufttfij
• of capacity M Y
the
IM
No. 2, second lift, three
ty flC 124 aee
of
k à
lift.
«ait

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