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The Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, September 24, 1908, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091218/1908-09-24/ed-1/seq-6/

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OUR FALL SUITS AND COATS
FOR LADIES
Smart Clothes
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for Smart Dressers
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In order to be dressed like
the Smart Dressers of
New York City requires a
hand tailored Benjamin Suit.
We carry them in the very
latest cuts and patterns in
Stouts, Slims and Regulars
which enables us to give
you a perfect fit always at
the right price. In order to
be convinced of the super
ior style and fit of these gar
ments, it but means to try
them on. These garments
are guaranteed to us
Alfred Benjamin, which
enables us to guarantee
them to you.
-V]
Are a revelation in Style, Workmanship and Price.
We can please the most fastidious dresser. We invite you
to visit this great department. Obliging ladies will be
pleased to have you try on the new things. A large range
of prices. Big stock of Children's School Jackets, also
Misses Skirts and Suits.
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See the New Kimona Cloth
Only 15c per yard.
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WATCH OUR
Sanitary Grocery Dept.
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by
A Fine Steel Range given away
can of J Baking Powder.
Every can guaranteed to give satis
faction and stand the pure food test
of the State of Idaho.
Call in and let us explain the proposition to
Your money back if you are not pleased.
with a 1 lb.
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MANHATTAN SHIRTS
DENT'S GLOVES
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Copyright,
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you.
ty
KNOX HATS
The IDAHO DEPARTMENT STORE
The Great Lace Sale, Monday and Tuesday, September 28th and 29th, 1 908
Cwln Jails Clines
Published every Thursday In the Gaut
Holohan Building, Main Street
WILBUR S. HILL
Editor and Publisher
INDEPENDENT REPUBLICAN
Entered as second class matter May
8 , 1905, at the postoffice at Twin Falls,
Idaho, under the act of Congress of
March 3. 1879.
Subscription Kates.
One year, in advance..
Six months.
$ 2.00
1.00
TEL. 89
The subscription books of the TIMES
are open to the inspection of adver
tisers.
DEMAND THIS LABEL
Bn AH of Your Printed Matter. It rep
resents Good Workmanship, Good
Wages, and Good Conditions.
From the looks of the opposition to
Speaker Cannon he is nearly a spiked
At any rate he is of too small
gun.
calibre to be in the national house.
AYith the primary election in force
the county convention might as well
be a Sunday school convention for all
the fun the politicians can get out
of it.
The regular howl from the Boise
Statesman about the poor state ticket
might deceive those unacquainted with
the sheet's past record in politics.
But the aforesaid paper made the
same howl against Governor Gooding
after his nomination and just as
quickly turned around and com
menced singing his praises.
Some of the finest exhibits of fruit
ever seen on the tract are being dis
played in the windows of the various
real estate offices about town. The dis- j
plays only emphasize the need for a
fair every year in order that the tract !
may be properly advertised.
Falls has the products to make any j
prospective settler sit up and take no- |
tice and these products should be 1
best advantage j
A permanent fair associa- |
Twin !
i
shown to the very
every year
tion will sooner or later be organized |
and It will have to obtain permanent
grounds and buildings. If the county
waits two more years before acquiring
land about this city it will be so high
that the association could net afford
to buy. But on the other hand the cit
izens of the tract and this city have
an excellent offer of forty acres just
across the viaduct at $175 per acre
which would give ample room for a
track and fair grounds. This same
land will in two years advance in
value so that it will be impossible for
a fair association to purchase at $275.
The same is true of land in any di
rection from the city. It would seem
that now is the proper time to get the
land even if no buildings could be
erected for several years.
of
The outcome of the county conven
tion when it went on record for the
primary election, is viewed with sat
isfaction by a great many. The Times
feels that the action of the convention
was only an acquiescence in the wish
of the voters of the party and the only
way out of a uncomfortable predica
ment. The men who attempted to
overthrow the primary vote in the con
vention were actuated only by the
highest motives and reaily believed
that their action was for the best in
terests of the party. Those men were
representative citizens and no man
could assail their integrity and honest
intentions in trying to mer.d the weak
places in the ticket, yet the Times be
lieves that after going before the Re
publican voters and pledging the party
to abide by the primary, there was
only one honorable thing to do and
that to make the result of the primary
the rule of the convention. The Times
does not believe that any voter is
bound to violate his own good judg
ment when it comes to cast the bal
lot in November and any undesirable
candidate can be quietly disposed of at
the polls without jeopardizing the
whole ticket. On the other hand had
the convention told the people that the
primary was just a bait and not in
tended to be binding, the people would
have come hack at the polls and slash
ed the whole ticket along with the
men who seemed undesirable.
to
as
GOVERNOR HUGHES IN THE NA
TIONAL CAMPAIGN.
"One of the best speeches of the
j campaign was delivered by Governor
a Hughes, of New York, at Youngstown,
! Ohio, September 5. It was the
j and with Mr. Hughes appeared Sena
| tor Beveridge,
be 1 Congressman Burton, Governor Har
j ris, of Ohio, and other prominent Re
| publicans. The meeting was preced
! opening of the campaign in Ohio,
i
Secretary Garfield
| ed by a demonstration, in which 12,
000 men marched in line, the great
a
in
be
majority of them workmen from the
neighboring steel mills. The address
of Governor Hughes contained an
thusiastic declaration of his support
of Mr. Taft's candidacy, a recital of
the achievements of the Republican
party, an indorsement of President
Roosevelt and the accomplishments of
his administration, end an examina
tion of some of the policies advocated
by Mr. Bryan. Of Mr. Taft he said:
"No one more than I desires to see
administration purged of every selfish
taint, to have lair and impartial laws
faithfully executed, to get rid of every
vestige of special privilege at the ex
pense of public interest, to liberate
trade from unjust encroachments, to
purify our electorial methods and to
en
to
is
at
in
maintain honest representative
ernment.
gov
And it is because of his
loyalty to these ideals, because of his
broad sympathies and his rare equip
ment in character, ability, and exper
ience, because tested in the difficult
fields of judicial and administrative
work he has proved his quality by
eminent service, because of his varied
learning, his acquaintance with af
fairs, his respect for constitutional
government, and his capacity intelli
gently and justly to plan and direct
necessary reforms, that I most earn
estly support the candidacy of Wil
liam Howard Taft."
He recounted briefly the history of
Republican administration since the
defeat of Cleveland Democracy, and
paid this tribute to President Roose
velt:
"For seven years with lofty aim
and unconquerable spirit he has la
bored for the people, and today, by
virtue of his sincere devotion to their
welfare, his valiant attack upon evil
in high places, his zeal for the com
mon interests, whether in the protec
tion of the public domain, or in insist
ence upon the freedom of inter-state
trade, or in the maintenance of high
standards of administration, or in the
recognition of the rights of labor, or
in the care of our national resources,
the forceful and representative leader
is typified to the popular imagination
in the person of Theodore Roosevelt."
—Outlook
the
Fnr Snle.
Thirty head sows and pigs.
Parks, Kimberly.
C. C.
the
g e pt. 3. tf.
Re
For Sale—Three Jersey cows, to
be fresh soon: 1 Jersey bull, also 40
acres choice land joining the town
site of Kimberly. Geo. F. Peterson,
Kimberly, Ida.
For Sale—10 tons baled alfalfa and
timothy hay. Geo. Hadenfeldt.
12,
FOR SALE—40 acres of good land,
three miles north of Filer. Inquire at
Times office.
of
of
to
to
THE TAXPAYERS WANT BONDS
(Continued From Page 1.)
within the past three years is a con
stant source of wonder to all the visi
tors with whom I have talked; they
all remark about the wonderful de
velopment of the farms, the progres
sive spirit displayed by our citizens
and predict a very bright future for
our county.
Personally I believe within ten
years we will have the richest and
best county in the state.
Taking into consideration the fact
that our records might be destroyed
by fire at any time, the very slight in
crease in taxes, and the immense sat
isfaction which we would all derive
from the possession of a modern coun
ty building, I feel confident that a
very great majority of the taxpayers
of the county will agree with me in
the opinion that we cannot afford to
delay the matter, and will so express
themselves at the polls on October
5th, next.
Let us all continue to boost and an
additional tax of 2c per acre on our
land will be very much more than
counterbalanced by the enhanced
value of our property.
Yours truly,
J. M. MAXWELL,
Cashier the First National Bank of
Twin Falls.
by
Twin Falls, Sept. 24, 1908.
Ed. Times.
I thiuk we should build a court
house that every citizen will be proud
of, and build for the future. The peo
ple of a .community are usually esti
mated by their public buildings,
think we should vote for the bonds.
F. D. KIMBALL,
Cashier McCornick & Co.
of
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by
or
To the Editor of The Times.
AVe consider it not only expedient,
but a necessity that the county build a
court house at this time.
The business of the county demands
it.
There is no disputing the fact that
the records are unsafe in their pres
ent location, and as a matter of pro
tection against loss Vt is a necessity.
The good business man would not hes
itate in thus protecting himself were it
a matter of his own private business,
or property, and while this matter
perhaps does not concern one individ
ual resident of the county more than
another, still it concerns us all and
each one should see to it that the
county records are safe, and thereby
protect himself.
The cost to each individual will not
be noticable. It is our* judgment that
no property owner in the county could
do anything that would increase the
value of his property as much for
double the amount that this will cost
him, as will the constructruction at
this time of a good ccurt house.
L. A. AVARNER.
Cashier Commercial & Saving Bank.
C.
to
40
Editor of the Times.
One vital point in favor of the court
house which has not been touched up
on to any extent is the fact that the
Twin Falls townsite company has
given the county a whole block of the
park and that a deed to the property
at
has a string on it. It will be neces
sary for the county to build a substan
tial court house within a given time
or lose a property easily worth $25,
000 .
the taxpayer sit down and soberly con
sider the bond proposition. I favor the
bond issue.
It is a point that should make
a
L. E. SALLADAY.
Editor of the Times.
Having been asked to give my opin
ion of the court house bond issue I
will state that I am heartily in favor
of the bonds carrying. The necessity
for protection of the records is a real
one and to any property owner is only
too apparent. A fire would destroy all
titles to over three million dollars
worth of property and make it impos
sible for any business man to give
safely a deed to any property so filed.
The question of taxes is to my mind
a small one, although I am a heavy
taxpayer. The increase in taxes which
were so terrifying to the taxpayers in
this school district, have already been
offset by the increase in property val
uation of the entire land in this school
district, until there is really no in
crease in the tax rate. The same would
be true for every inch of land on the
tract if the courthouse is erected. The
small sum necessary to pay interest
on the bonds does not compare in the
slightest degree with the loss that
might be caused through a fire in the
present quarters. Twin Falls county
has grown beyond the dream of the
most sanguine booster, and what two
years ago would have seemed prepos
terous can now be view as a neces
sity.
AV. H. ELDRIDGE.
Eldridge Clothing & Tailoring Co.
I
$50,000.
to loan on improved farms,
interest the lowest.
Company.
Rate of
Irrigated Land
a
r.
*********************
LJ. MILLER
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Funeral Director
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and Furnisher
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WITH LADT ATTENDANT
PRIVATE AMBULANCE
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III
LEGGETT BUILDING
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Strut, Nut Dur Wist if tatiffia
Main
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Phone 108 day. ornlght.
Fresh Oysters
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The seasoon is now on lor fresh oysters and
we will have regular shipments, Insuring the
best quality to onr patrons.
Independent Meat Company
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL TICKET.
For President,
WM. H. TAFT.
For Vice-President,
JAS. R. SHERMAN.
REPUBLICAN STATE TICKET.
United States Senator—Weldon B.
Heyburn, Shoshone.
Justice Supreme Court—Judge J. F.
Ailshie of Idaho.
Congressman—Thomas R. Hamer of
Fremont.
Governor—James H. Brady of Ban
nock.
Lieutenant Governjr—L. H. Sweet
ser of Cassia.
Attorney General—D. C. McDougal
of Oneida.
Auditor— S. D. Taylor of Bonner.
Mine Inspector— F. C. Moore of Sho
shone.
Superintendent of Public Instruc
tion—S. Belle Chamberlain of Ada.
Presidential Electors—Edgar Wil
son of Ada, John Lamb of Owyhee, A.
A. Crane of Kootenai.
COUNTY TICKET.
Senator, M. J. Sweeley.
Assessor, Geo. E. Harlan.
Treasurer, C. J. Hahn.
County Attorney, W. P. Ghthrie.
Probate Judge, J. AY. Shields.
Sheriff, John Peters.
Surveyor, Chas. Mull.
Superintendent of Schools, T. W.
Potter.
Commissioner, 1st District, E. T.
Newbry.
Commissioner, 2nd District, C. A.
McMaster.
Commissioner, 3rd District, E. R.
Sherman.
Don't forget that the world renown
ed Tom Thumb is to be married next
Tuesday evening at the rink. He and
his bride will be attended by about '40
little people.
Wanted to Sell
A grubbing machine in good condi
tion. Apply to Idaho Stores Co., Filer,
Idaho. 9-19-4 t.

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