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The Twin Falls times. [volume] (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, February 19, 1915, Image 1

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TWICE-A-WEEK
THE TWIN FALLS TIMES
VOL. X. NO. 38
TENTH YEAR.
TWIN FALLS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1915.
SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR
FRAUGHT WITH
POSSIBILITIES
Washington Regards German
Action Most Serious.
»0 ANSWER RECEIVED TO SHARP
HOTE OF PROTEST SEHT BY U. S.
Destruction of American Boats or
American Lives Might Precipitate
War. Many Ships in Danger.
Washington
Secretary Bryan said
late Wednesday night that no re
ply had been received from Ger
many to the American note concerning
submarine attacks on belligerent mer
chant ships in the new sea zones of
war under the German admiralty's
proclamation which goes into effect
Thursday. If a reply to the repre
sentations of the United States had
been delivered In Berlin to Ambassa
dor Gerard the state department had
not been apprised of that fact.
Publication Wednes
djiy night of
the text of Great Britain's complete
reply to the American communica
tion concerning contraband and neu
tral shipping revealed that England
does not intend to relax her vigilance
on the shipments of foodstuffs to Ger
manay and announces that' measures
are kn contemplation to retaliate
against submarine attacks by Ger
many on British merchant ships.
The warning in the British note
that if Germany abandons the princi
ples of international law by refusjng
to verify the character of a merchant
ship before attacking it, England may
not be bound by the rules hitherto
accepted, injected into the general sit
uation further uncertainties on which
the developments of the next few days
were generally expected to hav an
important bearing.
While Officials at tho'-White House
and state department did not discuss
what might be dome if any American
vessels or lives should be lost in the
war zoneB, it was admitted on all
sides that the situation was fraught
with many grave possibilities.
Ambassador Gerard's dispatchers
continued to give the text of anti
American editorials being printed in
semi-official papers in Germany. Of
ficials of the Washington government,
however, were confident of the rights
of the Waschington government and
pointed out that a position similar
to that of the United States had been
adopted by practically all the other
neutrals of the world.
German officials are entirely friemdly
in their conferences with Ambassador
Gerard and there is something to show
that officially there has been no
change in the good relations which
have hitherto existed.
The manner of carrying out the
submarine campaign is awaited here
with considerable anxiety. It was
hoped that on account of the fact
negotiations were still pending with
neutral governments that the Ger
man proclamation would not actually
be carried into effect for a few
days, although scheduled to If put
into force at midnight Wednesday.
Many American ships will be in the
war zones in the next few days having
left the Umited States before the Ger
man proclamation was made public,
and these will be afforded, it is be
Heved an apportunity to reach their
destinations.
A CLEAN MINSTREL SHOW
Richards St Pringle A Welcome Relief
From Ordinary.
Richards and Pringles Minstrels
captured capacity crowds for their
performances at the Lavering theatre
last week and made good in every res
pect The music was catchy with
none of the ordinary barnstorming
howling, most often thef rule with min
strel shows. The voices were har
monious and showed the result of
years of work done updpr the direc
tion of one of the premier minstrel
organizers of this country. The jokes
were clean and the fun of a nature
to please without causing a blush up
on the cheeks of the audience. Some
of the solos were especially good. Tak
en all In all Richards St Pringle kept
flnith with the public. Their show is
different.
EQUIPMENT FOR MILITIA
%
/ Best and Latest Design Used by U. 8.
Army for Company D.
The officers and members ot Com
pany D, Idaho National Guard, are con
gratulating themselves on receiving
their new equipment from the general
government. The equipment was or
dered shortly after the fire in the
armory, which destroyed everything
belonging to the company. It is un
derstood that the guns for the com
pany will be here shortly and the men
will theft be better equipped than ever
before.
i
IKE MATCHMAKER
yj
a
TwU Falls Dramatic Clnb to Present
Play, Monday, Feb. 22nd.
Daniel Sully's latest and greates
comedy "The Matchmaker," will be the
offering for Washington's birthday
with the following cast:
Father Daly.
Arnold Leslie.
Jim Carter.......
Colonel Potter. .. .Herbert Lauterbach
. .John Sinema
. Albert Benoit
. .. A. R. Jones
..Emery Benoit
Mildred Conway
.Gladys Dwight
Geneva Stafford
. .Ifolena Comt>6
. M. J. Macau ley
.C. N. Hutto
Wilfred Carter
Willie Buckman
Pierre .
Hank Griffith. .
Still Bill.
MarguYite.
Dolly.
Mrs. Wellington
Ann.
SYNOPSIS
Act. 1st. Main street. "Boom" City,
Idaho.
Act 2nd. Carter's ranch house. 2
hours later.
Act 3rd. Father Daly's cottage. 1
hour later.
a
Sayings of Father Daly.
Father — "Took your horse right
away from the saloon?"
Jim—"Yes."
Father—"Well, wh'd have thought it.
But, think how much worse you'd feel
if someone took you away from the
saloon.
Father—"You never heard me' use
slang.
Dolly—"Oh come off."
Father—"not on your life." Chase
me the sinkers.
Colonel—"A slight mention of my
good qualities."
Father—"I'll mention everyone be
fore I say one word
Father—"You're in iove? (Marga
ret bows head.) Of course you are if
you're in trouble. Love and trouble
are twins, born at the same moment
«nd you can not separate them until
one kills the other "
Mrs. Wellington—"But I Eiave had
one' husband."
Father—"He was a lucky man. He
died didn't he."
Father—"Mrs. McLauglin is on the
war path again." -
Dollle—"Did ÿbiï Bfee her7"
Father—'"No, I saw McLaughlin."
Dollie—"I know I bother you like
the devil."
Father—"Well, between the two of
you. you keep me pretty busy."
Mrs. Wellington—"I hope I don't in
trude."
Father—"Oh, no, you're as welcome
here as you'd be on the. street."
Carter—(Referring to Pierre) "Fa
ther, do you make it a practice of re
ceiving scoundrels in your house?"
Father—"Well, Jim, you're here on
your own Invitation."
Ann—-"He took my picture from the
mantel and iput her's here."
Father—"Oh, I see.
ed them about,
show that Jim is fond of moving pic
tures."
Father—"All the money in the world
can't buy a meal for a hungry heart."
Seats mow selling at Skeels-Wiley 's
Drug store. Prieoe 25c, 36c and 50c.
He just chang
Well, that goes to
ARE WATCHING NEWSPAPERS
All Reference to Lotteries Most be
Avoided.
The federal govOniment is keeping
a watchful eye upon the newspapers of
the country with rteganT ttR-Fublishiug
mews items and advertising of letter
ies. Most of the newspapers are well
aware of such a law and carefully
^ce rd m ag » n wh,T ,y
once in a while some unsuspecting
newspaper publisher is hailed before
the Federal grand jury for failing to
know his postal rules Such is the
case of two of Idaho's newspapers in
the recent federal grand Jury session
in Boise, when indictments were re
turned against them for running a news
item of a prize drawing. The newspa
per men are foolish to take chances
with the postal authorities for the Bake
of some insistent advertiser or per
son desiring notoriety. It is a no
ticeable fact that when the editor
gets into trouble those who would usa
him for their own ends never come
to the rescue with funds for the de
fense.
CAHSON-IBCHUTER
WeU Known Young People Joined in
Marriage Sunday Afternoon.
On Sunday afternoon at the Metho
dist parsonage, occurred the marriage
of Miss Bids Carlson to Mr. Lee Leich
liter, both well known younv people
of this city. The ceremony was per
formed by Rev. C. L. Bent, pastor of
th^fethodtat church.
paired
ents, I
about vhlrty rol
entertain
ty. Mrs.
Twin Falls (tying
her parehU 1
has always tx
the Methodist
her marriage
church. ML*
mupwwcere
■ couple re
e bride's par
jSjtson, where
Pikend s were
guAhiier par
known in
rami Mere with
psmre nome op*
. a«d Mrs.JrK.
at
rUy
fe
worker in
à time of
|t of the
Also well'
ftople, liv
farm eart
being
a
i-ntsaees
will make their
tract, where thej
and will go hP
i
ter
tdih
ion
puafeTia fsrm.
»keening at once.
GRADES WILL
BE REPAIRED
State Highway bigineer Will
Take Charge.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS CONSULT
WITH HIGHWAY EXPERT
New Grade Will Have Maximum of
Eight Per Cent With Total Length
of 5H04) Feet.
2
1
Engineer Smith with Assistant Cor
nell, of the State Highway construction
department, was a visitor in Twin
Falla Tuesday, while conferring with
the county commissioners concerning
the work on the Shoshone falls grade
a part of the Idaho Central highway.
Mr. Smith last year made a (prelimin
ary survey of a new route from the
rimrock down to the ferry landing and
was dlscu8sing: the probable cost.with
the county fathers. The state will have
oharge of all work done on this grade
and will bear one-third of the expense.
The new grade avoids the steep
pitch and hairpin turn at the top of
the present grade, cuts out several
bad pitches on what is now called
the old grade. The total length will
be 5800 feet down to the ferry and
the steepest portion will not exceed
eight percent.
Assistant Engineer Cornell will be
back next week with a survey crew
and make the cross-sectioning and
arrange for all preliminary work.
's
CURBS POWER 10 REGULATE
Ses uate Will Repeal Section Giving
Right to Prohibit Competition.
Rejecting the Hart amendment to
S. B. No. 12, the senkte, In committee
of the whole Wednesday, recommend
ed it for passage approving thereby
the repeal of the section of the law
giving power of the public utilities
commission to regulate competition.
In the discussion of the bill it was
asserted that if it passed, a measure
would follow, having for its purpose
the abolishment cf the commission.
It is expected that this will be intro
duced today.
When the committee took up con
sideration of this measure surd the
amendment offered Monday by Sena
tor Hart, Senator Rockwell offered
some amendments to the amendment.
Senator Hart's amendment would re
tain the power of the commission but
place guards about it. Senator Thomas
author of the measure opposed both
amendments and asked that the bill
be considered on its merits. Upon the
report of the committee. Senator El
liott asked for a rollcall, which re
sulted as follows:
Aves—Bremer, Carter, Fitz, Day,
Frazier, Fuller, Grant, Harding,
Hayes, Johnston, Kaline, Lenz, Mc
Cloud, Proctor, Pugmire, Thomas,
Whitcomb, Zuck. Total, 20.
Nays—Bowman, Bundy, Elliott,
Hart, Lowe, Mendephall,
Oraham
Montgomery. Ricks, Rockwell, Steele,
<p otft j 11
E X c UBe <i «butz Sweet
After the vote Senator Elliott ask
ed thnt hlg Tote be chan ^ ed to ave
in order that he might ask for a re
^r-npideration of the measure today.—
Statesman.
CLEVER VIOLINIST HERE
English Artist will Locate in Twin
Falls.
Twin Falls Is fast becoming a not
ed musical center and as such is at
tracting some of the best talent in
the country. The newest arrival is
Mrs. Rita Leeney, who is delighted
with our city and the outlook,
which she believes Will warrant her
settling hero.
Mrs. Leeney received her musical ed
ucation in London, England, where she
has taken the highest diplomas ob
tainable. She has also performed in
the famons "Queens Hall" in London
and received great praise in the prom
inent dallies and musical journals.
Mr». I,eeney will devote her time
to teaching the violin and the piano,
also in solo work.
THE HAWIIAN DUO
Natives ef Hawaii Island Entertain at
Orpheum.
The vaudeville feature at the Or
pheum theatre for the last throe nights
of the week is Kale and In delta Ko,
natives of the sunny Isle of Hawaii,
who present songs and dancing of that
far awav friand. The second act of
vaudeville is Feu and Paul in a clev
er çoroedv art. The photopfayn ape
of the he«t Wludlnr- "«'hot'- r* "»r
Kick " a Kevstone cnm«>dv. "The Mu
tual Wpe v, v " in hann^ln"* the world
over, and "Her Rrsve H"ro." •> on-"edy
drama, wHr* | e bound to please.
EXPECTING
PROSPERITY
Automobile Dealers Preparing
for Harvest.
LARGE FORTUNE INVESTED IN
CARS BY LOCAL AGENTS
Prospects For Best Year in the
History of the Business in Southern
Idaho.
Optimism seems to prevail among
the automobile dealers of Twin Falla
from the activity shown in the auto
mobiles now ready for delivery to
prospective buyers. Indications for a
good year are not wanting among the
buyers, who are already circulating
about the various agency headquarters
evincing a great amount of interest
In all of the working parts. That the
buyers are,.for the most part hunting
e dealers is evidence of better trade
conditions.
At present every agent in the city
has cars to sell without delay. Dur
ing the slack winter months several
carloads were received and with the
shipment, recently delivered, tie up a
very tidy little fortune. A very low
estimate of the cars standing am the
floors of the various agencies would
be $37,000.
any of the cars stored, the proper
ty of individuals. To add to the above
large amount of capital now tied up
should be included one or two ship
ments now on the road. During
this season at least, a hundred and
twenty-five more cars are included in
the contracts made with the manufac
turers.
It is certain that war scares and fin
ancial. depression arc unknown in
automobile vocabulary when the total
value of cars which will be sold (fqr
they will be sold) will total approxi
mately $250,000. Last year Twin Falls
city consumers (paid over forty thou
sand dollars to John D. for gasoline.
This year should double that figure.
This figure does include
CHRISTIAN CHURCH CROWDED
Revival Meetings Making Impression
In City.
The Christian church was crowded
full Wednesday night to hear Assistant
Evangelist Chase upon the subject,
"Whom Shall We Hear?"
Christ is the only one whom men
must hear, was the burden of his mes
sage. The theory, "Whatever a person
believes to be right, is right," is a
false one. Men can mot be trusted to
act on that proposition in business
dealings or in civic life. Laws are
necessary. Conscience is not a suffi
cient authority.
Many people point to the church as
the source of authority. Such elevation
of church leaders to so high a place
obscures the Christ. The working of
this theory has always led to lowered
standards and has spelled ruin to the
people who have practiced it.
God only has authority and He has
delegated it to Jesus Christ. "All au
thority has been given unto me in
Heaven and on Earth," said Jesus.
Many leaders have • risen in recent
years claiming the right to Bay the last
word religiously. "But when," said the
speaker, "was Jesus' authority taken
away and given to them."
Mr. Chase said that Evangelist Vaw
ter would be in Twin Falls for the ser
vice Friday or Saturday night. He as
Bured the audience that no one desir
ing to accept Christ would be asked to
wear any other church name aside
from those known in the days of the
apostles. No one would be asked to do
more in becoming a Christian than
Christ through the inspired apostles
has directed. Mr. yawter will give
chapter and verse In the New Testa
ment as authority for all that he says.
—Contributed.
I solicit the most difficult cases of
refraction. Dr. Robert A. Parrott, ex
pert optometrist.—Adv.
Nlhfey-Cbiinnellbclg,
CORRUPT PfLMIIlT «I
Bill to Restrict Expenditure of Money
by Candidates.
A bill that will attract statewide in
terest was introduced in the senate
yesterday by Senator Carter of Wash
ington county. It relates to and seeks
to restrict the lavish expenditure of
money by political organizations and
candidates,
practice act.
Provision is made in the
that no state or county central
mittee shall make a levy higher than
5 per cent of the salary on the candi
dates for offices other than senator
and representatives for whom the levy
is a flat one of $25 each. Soliciting
campaign contributions from corpora
tions in or outside of the state to be
used for campaign purposes is prohib
ited.
It is a stringent corrupt
measure
eom
The transportation of electors to
from the polls is also prohibited. Can
didates, or those assisting them, are
prohibited from distributing camipaign
cards or literature at any place on the
day of election and the payment of
money to helpers is placed under the
ban. Solicitations of campaign funds
from others than corporations is also
prohibited and candidates cannot make
promises of appointments.
The following candidates cannot pay
out more than the sums herein
tloned to be elected,
senator, $7,000; representative, $5,000;
justice supreme court, $2000 ^governor,
$5000; candidates for state ofttce, $2,
000; district judge, $1,000; state sena
tor, $150; state representative, $150;
county officials may sfpend up to as
high as $200 if the vote in the county
was 3000 or less and if in excess of
3000 $5 more for each 100 votes or
major portion thereof.
Provision is made for the filing of
an itemized statement of funds spent
by candidates for office. All matter
paid for as published in a newspaper
in behalf of a candidate mut be la
belled "advertising" and all jttdruture
distributed by candidates must bear
the name of the author, according to
the bill, which makes violation of its
terms a misdemeanor punishable by
fine or imprisonment. —Capital News.
or
men
United States
THE FIRST WOLF
Big Wolf Captured In Southeastern
Idaho.
Delroy Empey brought In a grey
wolf hide to F. C. Bowman Thursday
and received a check for $25, the
amount of bounty the Grazing associ
ation pays on a wolf. This is the
first wolf hide to be brought to Mr.
Bowman, though the coyote hides have
been coming in pretty fast since the
bounty was offered
The wolf in question was taken
on the foothills only a short distance
from Ammon. He was one of a pack
of nine which has done considerable
damage to the dry farming section to
the east. Poison had been set in two
place, one with the carcass of a sheep
and the other with a freshly killed
horse. The wolves had devoured the
sheep with apparently little damage
to themselves. The dose prepared
for them In the carcass of the horse
proved more efficacious, however, and
as a result one of the pack succumbed
and others were pretty sick- The
trail through the snow of the animals
was followed for twenty miles and sev
eral (places showed where some of
them had wallowed in the snow and
indicated that they were sick, but no
more desd ones were found.—Idaho
Falls Times.
RENIGED ON PRIZE
One Regimental Award Denied Com
pany D.
Because of the many honors accord
ed Twin Falls premier militia com
pany during the past year, the regi
mental trophy was awarded another
company, although Company D. was
entitled to It on the basis of scores.
The regimental officers deciding it
for the sake of dividing around the
honors to give it to another company.
The loss of this trophy makes the com
pany fall short of a clean sweep of
ail honors, but does not dim its won
derful record. The silver cupe won
are now being called into Boise for
the purpose of engraving of the com
pany's name upon each.
MASONS CONFER MGRRS
Splendid Banquet Served at Temple
Wednesday Evening
Wednesday of this week was a busy
one for the Masons of Twin Falls and
visitors from surrounding, towns. Com
mencing at one o'clock that afternoon
the Twin Falls lodge conferred degrees
on several candidates. The
conferred were one entered
egress
bpren
tice, four fellowcraft and three muter
mv=en degrees. At six o'clock in the
evening the members and visitors to
the number of 170, sat, down to a
ifriendld banquet. After the inner-man
had been satisfied, touts
sponded to by several of the visitors
and members. The degree work was
then resumed and not finished natll
the early hours of the morning.
o
were ra
\
CITY IS FREE
OF INDEBTEDNESS:
Is Enjoying New freedom Fronr
Deficit.
QUARTER!, Y FINANCIAL STATE
MENT DISTINCTIVE
Bonded Indebtedness Only Encum
brance Against City of Twin Falls
Cared For in Sinking Fnnd.
The city of Twin Falls this year, ac
cording to the quarterly financial
statement should emerge this year
with a small surplus as the result of
its careful management during the
past few years. Four years ago Twin
Falls carried about a twenty thousand
dollar floating indebtedness or out
standing warrants to exceed its
nues and resources. Last year it bad
been cut down to about twenty-eight
hundred dollars.
At the beginning of the fiscal year,
another saving was made the taxpay
ers by a cut of seven mills in the levy
for 1914. Now, according to City Clerk
Taylor, if all the tax money be consid
ered iq the resources, that approxi
mately $12,000 will be left May first to
turn over to the next administration.
The bonded indebtedness is not cov
ered in the estimate, but is cared for
in the sinking fund and interest
ments which are a part of the city
expenses.
reve
pay
BOOTLEGGERS SENTENCED
Jadge W. A. Itabcock Passes Judgment
on Four Men,
Last Saturday was sentence day in
the district court, when four men who
were guilty of selling liquor contrary
to the local option law were brought
Stephen
months in the
a fine of
Bert Johnson, four months in jail and
a fine of $400.00. Elijah Smith, tW©
months in jail and a fine of $300.0«.
David Snyder was fined $150.00 and
costs. As soon as Snyder has served
out the fime in this county, he will be
taken to Payette, where he will be
compelled to answer to a
charge.
There are several others confined
in the jail, who will have their trial
for bootlegging at this term of court
Rich King*, throe
county jail, and
three hundred dollars.
up.
serious
THE BARRIER OF FLAMES
u
»*
Interesting Two Part Story of a Dog's
Love at the Orpheum.
"The Barrier of Flames" which is
to be seen at the Orpheum for the last
three nights of this week, is an Inter
esting story of the love of a dog for
his little mistresB. In this picture
will
$5,000.00 Scotch Collie, and featuring
Helen Bagley, the interesting little
girl of the same company. In this
picture will be seen Shep rescuing
Helen from a burning building, climb
ing the ladder, leading the firemen to
where the child is. When Helen In
safe Shep makes a flying leap from
the top story to the building to the
ground. The story will surely inter
est the children as well as the grown
be seen "Shep," Thamhouser
ups.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS MSTDK
Mountain Home Entertains Mem hors
•f Sixth District Monday.
On Monday of this week Mountain
Home entertained the Knights of Pyth
ias of the Sixth district. The muting
was well attended by delegates from
southern Idaho. After the basiaeaa
of the day had been transacted, n
splendid banquet waa served the vis
itors by the Pythian Stators of Moan
tain Home. The next meeting will ha
held at Glenns Ferry. The full ii win«
delegates were present from this (to:
W. E. Nixon, J. A. Dimond. Jnama
Grossman, Charles Kldrid, Gay i
itt, S. G. Gamble, U A. Hardy, C. C.
Biggins, William Minn ick.
FINE VAUDEVILLE ATTRACT)»
BUly
Btllf Murray and Ban
tor known as tke boy and
pnnNa Will be featured tag
tomorrow night as the vaad<
treptton at the Lavsttng th
and comedy
o
Murrays are dime! from tha 1
circuit playing some ot the
show houses in tha Iv« cf
wonderful range of voice and
of the ben wardrohea to
stage their ants,
certainly ç lease
goers.
it- Uprrejn
Twin Falls

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