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The Twin Falls times. [volume] (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, February 23, 1915, Image 1

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TWICE-A^VEEK
THE TWIN FALLS TIMES
TWIN FALLS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, IDAHO, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1915.
TENTH YEAR.
SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR
VOL. X. NO. 39
BUHL MAN GETS
POISONEDCANDY
Kills
red
M.
with
and
ed
ing
in
loaded With Strychnine Enough
to Kill a Bear
J. C. M'CAHE RECEIVES PACKAGE
FROM MOUNTAIN HOME.
Man Holding Grudge Against Recipient
Suspected of Offense. Postal Au
thorities Investigating.
A sensational poisoning case has de
veloped at Buhl, which may result in
a criminal cause celebre.
Several weeks ago J. C. McCabe, of
Buhl, brother of F. C. McCabe, the
well known sheepman, received a box
of candy in the mails. It was from
Mountain Home, but the address made
the recipient suspicious. The town of
Buhl was written 'Buell,' and Mr. Mc
Cabe, knowing that a very bitter ene
my of his who lived at Mountain Home
always wrote Buhl in that way, decid
ed that before he ate any of the confec
tionery he would have it examined.
Acting on the hint, he sent a sample
of the candy in the box to the labora
tory of the state university. The re
port of the chemist there amply con
firmed Mr. McCabe's suspicions. There
was enough strychnine in the confec
tion to kill a half a dozen horses. Evi
dently the man who forwarded the
gift as an expression of his holiday
sentiments was taking no chances—
"dead men tale no tales."
The authorities are working on the
and the federal sleuths are like
she
to
of
case,
wise taking a hand in the game. While
there is absolutely no doubt in Mr.-Mc
Cabe's mind as to the donor of the
gift, it is not always an easy matter to
prove a crime of this kind, and the of
ficers are seeking to bring it home to
the guilty one.—Filer Journal.
SUCCESSFUL MEETINGS
Great Crowds at Christian Church
.Sunday Morning and Evening.
Evangelist C. R. Vawter arrived in
Twin Falls Saturday as has been prev
iously announced and immediately took
charge of the revival services at the
Christian church. He proved himself
to be equal to all the favorable com
ment made about him. Mr. Vawter
puts his hearers at their ease by his
free and pleasant manner and pre
sents the Gospel plainly and directly
yet without any offensiveness.
in his first address Evangelist Vaw
ter said that God never puts a nre
mium on laziness. In His plan of sal
vation and human progress God some
how saw fit to use men's efforts, and
since He planned the saving of the
world after that fashion He must have
men's help. Doing places a man where
God can help him. When the Father,
through Christ, commands, man must
obey hecause nothing is useless that
God tells man to do.
It is human nature for a person to
surround himself with a shell of pre
conceived notions and prejudices. This
shell must be broken before the Truth
enter that person's life. Many feel
and
can
that to give up a view of lif
truth held for years or perhaps since
childhood is to be a 'turncoat.' This
is not the case. Any true man or wo
man will follow the light of Christ i
no matter where It leads.
The interest in the meetings thus |
far is all that could be desired. There
were 377 in the Bible school last Sun
day morning and such a large mim
ber of people attended the evening ser
vice that an overflow meeting was held
In the church basement by Evangelist
L. E. Chase. During the two services
Sunday, thirty persons took a stand
for Christ.
These evangelical meetings will con
tinue indefinitely. Everyone is invlt
ed
. COMMITTEE
TWIN FALLS IN MOVIES
Sharttz Film Company Taking Pictures
of City and Country.
Representatives of the Sharitz Film
of Cincinnatti, Ohio, a-c in
company
the city taking motion pictures i f the
priocipfcl places of interest in and
around the city. The men engaged in
the work will take pictures of the pub
He schools and pupils, having already
taken the pupils of the Bickel school.
A picture will be made of the fire de
pariment in action, one picture ns the
company leaves the fire station and
others as the department is making a
fast run for several blocks. The coin
will also have pictures of the
pany
buildings and street scenes of the
city, stores and business houses. A
picture of the Shoshone falls and oth
polnts of Interest will also be tak
As soon as the pictures are fin
ished they will be shown at one of the
local picture houses in the city. The
work would have bden done sooner If
ttm cloudy wout*or had not Interfered
with the operations.
er
en.
RUPfRT MAN MURDERS
Kills Woman Who Refused to Mary
Him.
Rupert—A double tragedy occur
red Saturday night at Minidoka, a !
small village some 15 miles from !
Rupert, when T. W. R. Nelson, a
prominent and wealthy merchant of
Rupert, shot and killed Mrs. Nellie
M. Pittenger, also of Rupert, after
wards turning the gun upon himself
with fatal effect,
Mrs. Pittenger, who ran a boarding
house here, also owned 'a dry ranch
near Minidoka, cornering on Kimani,
and had reached Minidoka on her way
home from a visit to the
Learning of her return Nelson hoard
ed the evening train from Rupert and
went to Minidoka to meet her, find
ing her at the hotel.
A coroner's inquest was held Sunday
morning, the jury returning a verdict
in accordance with the facts in the ,
The principal witness at the .
a j
If
ranch.
case.
inquest was Mrs. Edna Hunter,
sister of the murdered woman, who |
was present when the shooting was
done. She testified that Nelson fol
lowed her sister up stairs and that
she had remained to the room, real
izing that Nelson had a gun and had
been drinking.
Pittenger, "Are you going to marry
me?" She replied "No, I would not
marry the best man that ever
walked."
At that he reached .into his hip
pocket for his revolver and shot her
to the chest. She fell to her knee9
and began to moan and he shot her
again.
secured a gun she had in her pocket
book and fired at Nelson in defense
of her sister. Then Nelson turned
the gun on himself and fired two
shots, one reaching the brain and
killing him instantly.
Nelson was about 62 years old and
had a large family of grown up chil
dren.
and furniture store in
another at Paul. Idaho,
terested in two banks in Utah and
other enterprises. He has always
beeu regarded as a level headed busi
and was highly respected.
Nelson asked Mrs.
The witness testified that she
He owned a large hardware
Rupert and
He was in
to
to
nss man
Both victims of the double tragedy
will be buried in the Rupert ceme
tery, Mrs. Pittenger on Tuesday and
Mr. Nelson on Wednesday.—Statesman.
MIMA

«
Well Known Play Shown In Pictures
at the Layering Saturday.
in
the
his
sal
and
the
that
to
pre
feel
and
The play-goers of Twin Falls will
have an opportunity to witness a beau
tiful play in five acts, dramatized from
Marie Corelli's most widely read Ro
mantic story of the land of the Mid
night Sun, entitled "Thelma," at the
Layering theatre, Saturday, February
27.
"Thelma" is a wholesome story read
by all tongues and can be found
the books in the libraries of
among
those who love good, clean fiction,
you have read the book you will he
surprised to see how well the story has
been written into dramatic form and
you will see the characters of the
story apparently step from the book
to act out the story surrounded by
the atmosphere of Norway and Eng
land.
Richardson and Talbert, who are
bringing "Thelma" to Twin Falls, have
placed the characters of the story into
the hands of an exceptionally strong
of artists who portray the
This beautiful scenery and electrical ef
wo- f ect8 You will see the Echo Cave,
i t b e Midnight Sun, the Rainbow of
Death, the Burning Ship, in which the
thus | old viking makes his last sea voyage,
etc
Sun- Remember the date an? buy your
tickets early. Reserved seats on sale
ser- at the Rexall Drug store,
held
con
company
characters true to life as the story
and have mouuted the play with
BORAH ASKS FOR LOAN
Fifty MHUon Dollars to Help the
Homesteaders.
Washington, Feh. 13.—Senator W.
E. Borah today offered his bill auth
orizing a loan of $50,000,000 to a rec
lamation fund, us an amendment to
the administration water power bill,
now on the senate calendar. This
amendment contemplates the transfer
of $50,000,000 from the treasury to the
reclamation fund, to order to hasten
the completion of projects now under
way, and to permit authorization and
construction of several important new
projects, including the Black Canyon
project to Idaho
Senator Borah also offered his bill,
amending the cultivation clause of the
three-year homestead law, as an
amendment to the administration bill
providing for 6t0-acre stock-raising
homesteads,
vides that homesteaders in lieu of cul
tivation, may establish good faith by
malting improvements on their land to
the extent of $1.50 an acre a year.
Both bills, to which amendments wére
offered, have passed the house and
have been reported to the senate.—
Idaho Falls Register.
Film
in
the
and
in
pub
de
the
and
a
coin
the
I solicit the most difficult eaaog
refraction. Dr. Robert A. Parrott,
Tills amendment pro
the
A
oth
tak
fin
the
The
If
pert optometrist.—Adv.
MOTORISTS MAY
60 INTO PARK
!
, Hecause of the fair and general
. activity this should prove an excep
j tional season for motor travel, and
there is reasonable assurance that
Pocatello will witness a great deal of
such traffic, which of necessity must
come through the Gate City of Idaho
before it can be distributed over the
state.
That Yellowstone park will be open
to automobiles this year is now prac
tically a certainty, according to ad
vices received this week by R. W.
Spangler, the Idaho representative of
the "American Automobile association.
In a communication received from
A. G. -Batchelder, chairman of the
executive committee of the A. A. A.,
who is in Washington, D. C., he sayB
the association is bending every ef
fort to have the park opened in time
for the motor tourist travel. Chair
man Batchelder quotes a letter re
ceived from Senator Brady as fol
lows :
Washington, Feb. 13.—Mr. A. G.
Batchelder, American Automobile as
sociation, Riggs building, Washington,
D. C.—My dear Mr. Batchelder:
I have your favor of February 10th
relative to securing the admission of
automobiles to Yellowstone park so
that the 1915 interstate travelers will
have an opportunity of using their
own vehicles in the park during the
season of 1915. I had several con
ferences with Mr. Miller relative to
this matter and my understanding
was that we would be able to have
automobiles in the park during 1915,
I assure you that I am much in favor
of this movement and will be glad to
assist In any way I can to have this
service established.
I am enclosing herewith for your
Information a copy of a letter I have
just written to Mr. Mather.
Very truly yours,
(Signed) JAMES H. BRADY.
February 13th, 1915. Hon. Stephen
T. Mather, assistant to the secretary
of the interior, Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Mather:—I had several
conferences with your predecessor,
Mr. Miller, relative to having automo
biles
park.
If me that as soon as conditions were
ripe it would be beneficial to have
automobiles used in the park. It was
necessary at that time to have certain
improvements and changes made in
the roads through the park. My un
derstanding is that this work has
been completed and I have been won
dering if it was not possible to give
the people who visit the exposition the
advantages that automobile service in
the park would afford. It would be a
splendid thing if we could have this
service in the park during the ex
position and I will be glad to have
any information along this line that
you can furnish me, and I will be glad
to co-operate with you in every way
I can in order to secure this Bervice
which would be of so much benefit to
the public.
Senator J. H. Brady Working
to Open Gateway
GOOD NEWS RECEIVED FROM THE
HEAD OF ASSOCIATION
Hundreds of Tourists Will he Through
Western States on Their Way to
California.
dall
The
and
lish
and
ing
|
of
of
in the Yellowstone National
Mr. Miller fully agreed with
he
the
by
are
the
ef
of
the
sale
Very truly yours,
(Signod) JAMES H. BRADY.
In the press report sent out by
Chairman Batchelder to over 2,000
newspapers and about 200 farm pub
lications throughout the United States
is this paragraph:
For those who would emerge from
Yellowstone at the western gate there
would be offered the Idaho route,
which would include Shoshone falls,
deservedly known as the Nlaeara of
the west, and successfully compet
ing with the great cataract In its pic
turesque grandeur.
Unquestionably the western coun
try is going to make an irresistible at>
peal to a large percentage of the mil
lion and three-quarters of motor car
road travelers.—Pocatello Tribune.
the
W.
rec
to
bill,
This
the
and
new
bill,
the
an
bill
cul
by
to
year.
wére
and
SYMPHONY CONCERT
High Stiool Auditorium, Monda /Ev
ening, March First. /
tra will
give one of their popular edneerts at
the high school auditorium, Monday
evening, March first. The orchestra
is composed of thirty-ffve of the city's
best musicians, who have been re
hearsing for the past three months
for the event. The program Includes
the finest standard overtures, as well
as several of the lighter numbers. The
orchestra will be assisted by Miss Pau
line Alfonte, violin: Mrs C O i-nneley
soprano and Prof. Claudo Hyde, 'anor
of*The ttiubIc lovers of this cltv are as
ex-|sured of two hours of the finest mu
sic ever heard here.
Twin Falls Symphony Ore
pro
FILER FARMER
IN LAWS TOILS
play
ic
Mrs.
most
large
the
was
the
for
ley
Alleged to Have Fired Several Shots
at Neighbors as They Fled Froml lQ
jlj .neva
'
part
ter.
like
as
ty
the
as
as
as
to
for
the
in
of
of
so
to
to
was
in
un
has
give
the
in
a
this
ex
have
that
glad
way
to
Quarrel Oyer Boundary
Ends In Gun Play.
Line
JESSE MOI, ER ARRESTED FOR AT
TEMPT TO COMMIT MURDER.
Jesse Moler, a farmer residing on a
school section north of here, was ar
rested Sunday evening by Sheriff Ken
dall on a charge of attempted murder.
The complaint was sworn to by C. D.
McKinley and F. C. Ripley, who, to
gether with D. A. and A. G. McKinley
and others, were attempting to estab
lish the boundaries between the Moler
and McKinley farms, Sunday after
noon. Witnesses to the affair claim
that Moler accosted the party, making
.vicious threats" and attempted to pro
voke a fight with his insults, but fail
ing in this he returned to hiB shack
where he procured a double barreled
shot gun and a belt of cartridges
whereupon the party fled while Moler
fired upon them. There were six wit
nesses to the shooting.
The defendant was bound over
awaiting the action of the district
court, in session at the present time in
Twin Falls.—Statesman.
NAMPA DANCES REGULATED
City Council Limits Dancejr to Old
Fashioned Kind y
At a regular mopting of the city
council Monday evening the danger
of rabies from rabid dogs and coy
otes was discussed and resulted in an
ordinance being passed requiring all
dogs within the city limits to be muz
zled. The mayor was authorized to
issue a proclamation requiring imme
diate obedience of the ordinance.
New tangled dances were not ap
proved by the city dads and an ord
inance was passed limiting the tersi
corean devotees to the old-fashioned
dances. The Tango, the Fox trot and
the Maxixe may do for sports but they
won't go in good old Nampa where a
semblance of cleanliness will be main
tained anyway. In accordance with
the terms of the ordinance, placards
have been printed and put up in the
dance halls of the city Following is
a copy of the placards:
Nothing but conventional dancing
allowed. This means one arm must
be extended or hanging loose _at side.
No close dancing allowed. There
must be six Inches between heads,
and no heads allowed on shoulde 1- or
arm. The law in regard to drinking
will be strictly enforced. The smell
of liquor on the breath is sufficient
evidence. By order of mayor and
council.—Nampa Record.
Company D, ol Twin Falls, Putting
Rose on the Map.
HAVE YOU SEEN" ROSE?
Meaning of course, the play "A Rose
of the Desert," a comedy drama writ
ten by Leonard Williams of this city
and to be produced by local talen at
the Layering theatre on the fourth of
March, for the benefit of the Armory
Fund of Co. D, N. G. I.
The play is semi-western in trend,
the first two acts taking place in the
foothills of the Rockies, where a young
western doctor finds Rose. The Btory
is carried to Chicago, where everything
turns out as you don't expect it to.
There is not a dull moment in the
two and one-half hours of play, as
there is plenty of comedy and many
trying situations.
The play bas^Just been published In
the east and Is' assured a big run the
coming season. This is the first per
formance under the author's direction
and should not be missed if you like
good wholesome comedy.
Tickets at Skeels-Wiley Drug store.
by
2,000
pub
from
there
route,
falls,
of
pic
coun
at>
mil
car
pm
/Ev
M
will
at
city's
re
well
The
Pau
'anor
as
mu
COAL
ill
ir.
PLEASED LARGE AUDIENCE
Home Talent Company in "The Match
maker" is Good.
"The .Matchmaker," a home talent
play staged by the Twin Falls Dramat
ic club, under the able direction of
Mrs. Wilfred McKay Olson, proved
most pleasing Monday evening to a
large audience at the Layering. The
results of experience and drill from
the staging of "Polly of the Circus"
was very apparent and very little of
the amateurish hesitancy was noted
through the whole evening. The plot
centering around the ministrations of
Father Daily, the priest with a genius
for matchmaking allowed M. J. Macau
ley in that role to develop the well
known wit and repartee of the Irish
lQ the amusing situations. Miss Ge
.neva Stafford as the dashing young
widow, Mrs. Walltogton, played her
part In a clever manner, as did Herb.
Lauterbach, as her lover, Colonel Pot
ter. Miss Mildred Conway, as the
young heroine and ward of Jim Carter,
attempted a very difficult role with
marked succesb, fcarryingi her part
like a seasoned actress. W. M. Olson
as Jim Carter, showed, too, his abili
ty as a finished actor. Miss Gladys
Dwight as mischief-making, harum
scarum Polly, was also able to enliven
the scenes with Father Dally by her
wonderful vocabulary to pure adulter
ated American slang. Mias Combs,
as Silent Ann, showed a perfect com
mand of every situation in a very dif
ficult part. Albert Benoit, disguised
beyond the recognition of his friends, of
as Pierre, maintained his reputation by
as a clever and versatile actor. Charles
Hutto as Leslie, the tenderfoot, was up out
to his usual standard. John Sinerna as will
Willy Buckman with monocle in eye, the
drew plenty of applause at every ap
pearance in his love making.
The company, after only a brief time
for rehearsal, was able to surpass in
the entire performance, a numher of to
tock compamies which have appeared
in this cRy.
its
FMr Wednesday and Thursday of
this week the Isis will present to the
Twin Falls public a two-pant drama,
of love and politics called "The Game
of Life." A fine comedy will be seen
with the title "Two Hearts That Beat
as Ten," this is said to be a comedy
hard to beat.
the
cern
to
time
the
this
was
THE GAME Of Llff
a
is
or
Two-Part Drama at the Isle, Wed. and
Thurs. ol This Week.
There will also
be seen a splendid Biograph drama
and one of George Ade's comedies.
Friday and Saturday Col. Heeza Liar
will be introduced to the Twin Falls
public again.
\
DISTRICT COURE WORK
Trial if Ralph Cunningham and Harry
Haft well Being Held This Week.
Thq criminal cases in the district
court are being disposed of at the pres
ent time. FYiday afternoon the case of
RaLph Cunningham and Harry Hart
well, who are charged with the crime
of'grand larceny, which is alleged in
the complaint of killing cattle on the
rhnge was commenced. All of Saturday
ywas consumed in securing a Jury to
try the case. Tuesday the case was
still before the court, and it is more
than likely it will not be finished un
til the last of the week.
-
WORLD FAMOUS NOVEL
at
of
the
to.
the
as
In
the
per
like
St. Elmo at the Orpheum, Wednesday
Only of This Week.
The management of the Orpheum
theatre has been able to secure for
Wednesday of this week to motion
pictures, the world famous novel "St.
Elmo," in six parts. This is the great
est love story of the ages In picture
form. The picture Is taken at Long
Beach, California, with the beautiful
settings of that semi-tropical country.
The story in book form has captivated
millions, so do not fail to Bee it In
picture form.
CHANGE IN BUSINESS EHMI
^rjfes From
J. E. Cress Sells Store to P
Colorado.
It is understood that the Cress Gro
cery store on south Main street has
changed hands. Mr. Cress selling to
parties from Colorado. The change in
ownership will take place in a few
days, the business being carried on at
the old stand.
A FEW EVERY DAY PRICES
At Binkert's Cash Grocery. Pay cash
at a cash store and you will save
money. We pay the market price for
eggs and butter in exchange for gro
ceries and you get the benefit of thesf*
prices. 2 gal. Jacket syrup, $1.00; 1
gal. 65c; a good steel cut coffee, 25c;
8 bars yellow soap 25c; Tomatoes 10c;
can Armour's hulk mince meat 15c lb.;
fresh peanutB 2 lbs. 25c; English wal
nuts 26c lb.; 6 gal. oil 85c. Wo have
a fresh and complete line of D. M.
Ferry and C. C. Morse garden and
flower seeds. We deliver. Phone 311.
324 Main avenue south.—Adv.
CANDY FACTORY
TO POCATELLO
of the advantages which would accrue
by reason of the location. With the
railroads radiating in all directions
out of Pocatello, the shipping falicities
will prove very advantageous, whle
the increase in capital will practically
double the possibilities of the business
and guaranty a sure profit to the in
vestors,
Bath of the young men have resided
to Twin Falls for a number of years
and have been active in all civic af
fairs and it is with regret that the
business men will see the business and
its promoters leave the city.
W. Z. Smith is in Pocatello at pres
ent arranging for the removal which
will be made as soon as possible after
the first of March. J. W. D. Smith,
who is pushing the sale of Sho-Fa
products on the road, will make his
of headquarters in Twin Falls for the
Secures Added Capital In New
Location.
LOCAL ESTABLISHMENT CHANG*
1NG BASE OF OPERATIONS
Pioneer Idaho Candy Firm Now Reach
ing Out lor Wider Field of Endeavor.
With Better Facilities.
The Smith Candy company, probably
the pioneer candy manufacturing con
cern in Idaho, will the last of this
week to remove its plant from this city
to Pocatello, where it will enlarge its
business to almost double its present
capacity. The founders of one of Twin
Falls' industries, W. Z. and J. W. D.
Smith, have been negotiating for some
time with Pocatello men who were de
sirous of putting more capital Into
the buslnees. As a result, comes the
announcement of the removal from
this city to the Gate City. The move
was made after consideration of all
present, while the management of the
factory will be in the hands of W. Z.
Smith in the Gate City. A number of
the skilled employes of the company
will also remove to Pocatello.
YOUNG MAN HELD FOR RUSTLING
Francis B. Peck Arrested For Butcher
ing Cattle at Shoshone.
George D. Campbell was at Soldier
on Monday making an arrest for Sher
iff Clements, of Blaine county. He
took into custody Francis B. Peck,
who is charged with cattle rustling.
Matt Caldwell, who was apprehended
in Shoshone last week, Is in custody
with the same charge. It is alleged
against Peck and Caldwell that in Oc
tober last, they slaughtered cattle from
the range and sold the meat. Num
bers of the buried hides were recov
ered.
Cyrus Holden, who was arrested
last week in Utah, is said to have re
vealed the location of the slaughter
pan used by the rustlers. Numbers
of the hides that had been buried were
recovered. When the officers went
after Peck, whose home is near the
Magic dam, they found he had left
there and was located at Soldier,
where he was a hospital patient. Hol
den is held as being Implicated in a
charge of horse stealing and to Joe
Wheeler, who arrested him, he has
made a clean breast of various enter
prises.
It is said that among the buyers of
the meat was the commissary depart
ment of the highway district road
camps.—Shoshone Journal.
of
in
the
to
un
for
"St.
Long
In
CONVICTED OF LARCENY
George Nolan and Percy Heath Con
victed of Cattle Stealing.
The trial of George Nolan and Percy
Heath, who were charged with stealing
cattle from Ira Brackett, of the Three
Creek country, occupied the most of
last week. The Jury was given the
case Friday evening, returning a ver
dict of guilty Saturday morning. The
men have not yet been sentenced. The
case was a hard fought one from the
start to the finish, the two men being
defended by C. O. ixmgley and W. E.
Golden, of the firm of Longley and
Walters, while the state's case was
handled by County Attorney J. E. Da
vies, assisted by C. M. Booth.
From
Gro
has
to
in
few
at
MEETING OF COURT OF HONOR
cash
save
for
gro
thesf*
1
25c;
10c;
lb.;
wal
have
M.
and
311.
New Organisation Holds Fine Meeting.
Thursday Evening.
The Court of Honor, which was or
ganized in this city a few weeks am,
held a splendid meeting in Hooke hall
last Thursday evening. A cl MM pt
twelve candidates was g
evenln
held
ted
will bn
win bn
ig. The next m
March 4, a card pftty
given, with dancing and a flan
lunch. 8tate Organiser Penney will
be present for the occasion. •
Ä

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