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The Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, August 31, 1915, Image 7

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091218/1915-08-31/ed-1/seq-7/

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Sweet and Wholesome
Good as a chew of
Spear Head" means
the supreme degree of
rich, luscious flavor.
No other tobacco can
compare with SPEAR
HEAD in the sweet and
wholesome satisfaction
it gives. The purity of
u
Spear Head
PLUG TOBACCO
is safeguarded at every step
in its making. The factory
is as clean and sanitary as a
pure-food factory—the
processes are pure-food pro
cesses.
When the choice red Bur
ley has been pressed into
mellow-sweet SPEAR HEAD
w plugs you have a chew
m that simply can't be
■k equalled. Try it and
|A see for yourself.
>n»n
THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Invites you to see its officers when
you have any financial questions to
decide. We are the oldest bank on
Our experience is at
- the tract.
your disposal.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF TWIN FALLS
HOW MANY INDIANS IN IDAHO
Two Government Reports Fall to Tal
ly Indians in This State.
Washington -— How many Indians
are there in Idaho? Nobody seems to
know The census bureau has just
completel and published its report on
the Indian census taken in 1910, and
asserts that the total Indian popula
tion of the state in that year was 3488.
The Indian bureau statistics for 1910
show 3988 Indians in Idaho,
would naturally be presumed that the
census bureau would find more In
dians than the Indian bureau, inas
much as it undertakes to enumerate
all residents, whereas the Indian bu
reau deals only with Indians under its
own jurisdictions, but as a matter of
fewer Indians, taking the country as
a whole, than did the Indian bureau.
Can it be that the Indian bureau Is
padding its rolls to get more money
out of congress?
Census Bureau Figures.
Of the total number of Indians
found in Idaho by the census bureau,
2864 were full bloods, the remainder
mixed.
There were in 1910 2704 Indians in
Idaho 10 years of age or over, and of
these 1607 were illiterate. This is 59.4
The Indian schools, how
getting in their work for
It
per cent,
ever are
back in 1910 there were 2426 illiterate
Indians in Idaho more than 10 years
of age, or 76 per cent of the total of
Of the illiterates, 484 were
that age.
unable to speak English.
A goodly proportion of the Indians
of Idaho more than 10 years old are
reported as engaged in gainful occu
pations, there being 752 males and 52
females, or 55 per cent of the males
over 10 years and 4 per cent of the
femalfK* This seems to disprove the
old idea that the squaws are support
ing the bucks—in Idaho.
Of the Indians in Idaho, 1334, or
38 per cent are now taxed; in 1910,
1929, or 45 per cent were taxed.
Many Tribes Represented.
The census report shows the classi
Idaho Indians by
The
4
17
2
4
6
j
2
. 1035
1
.. 96
fication of the
tribes. The great bulk of Indians in
Idaho belong either to the Nez Perce
or Shoshone tribes* but a greet many
other tribes are represented,
classification follows:
Bannock .
Brotherton .
. 363
2
Cayuse .
Cherokee .
Coeur d'Alene
Colville .
Cree ..
Delaware .
Flathead ..
Kalispel .
Kootenai .
Modoc .
Mohawk .
Nez Perce .
Oklngan .
Paviotso .
Piegan .
Shoshone .
Spokane .
8
284
16
107
152
1259
Umatilla .
Walla Walla
Warm Springs
Wyandot .
Yakima .
Not Reported .
22
1
4
1
12
87
STATE LAND SALE.
Notice is hereby given that on Sat
urday, September 4, 1915, the follow
ing described tracts of land, belong
ing to the State of Idaho, and situated
in Twin Falls County, will be offered
for sale at public auction at the Court
House at Twin Falls, Twin Falls
County, Idaho, at 1:30 P. M. of said
day, to-wit:
Subdivi
sion.
Appraised
Sec.Twp.R. Value
36 10S15E $1100
Lease.
sw%ne^
nw>4nw!4 3101 Ex.'17.
sw%nw!4 " " " " "
se!4nw!4 " " ..
ne&sw!4 4389 Ex.'19 " " "
seViswi4 " " " "
DWÜsey« 3182 Ex.'17.
sw^seVi " " " " "
seV4se^4 " ..
Terms ot Sale:
One-tenth of the purchase price and
first year's interest on deferred pay
ments, cash on day of sale; the bal
ance in forty annual installments at
six per cent interest.
Improvements cash on day of sale.
Land sold subject to harvesting of
crops on land leased.
By order of the State Board of Land
Commissioners.
GEO. A. DAY,
State Land Commissioner.
Aug. 6-13-20-27
RIGHT FEEDING FOR CALVES
Flaxseed Jelly is Excellent Substitut«
for Fat or Cream—Give Some
Bran and Whole Oata.
There Is no need of feeding the or
dinary calf for a longer period than
one week on whole milk. Of course
the change to sweet skim milk should
not be made suddenly, nor without
substitutes for the fat or cream. To
replace the fat that has been removed
from the milk, as well as to furnish
additional protein, there Is nothing
that can take the place of flaxseed
jelly. This jelly should be added In
small quantities at first and slowly in
creased. Begin with a dessertspoonful
in each feed and gradually increase
until about a cupful is being fed night
and morning to the three-months-old
calf. To prepare this jelly steep one
pound of whole flaxseed in water al
most boiling, until a thick paste re
sults. It should be kept cool and sweet
until fed. In addition to the flaxseed
jelly a little dry bran and whole oats
should be fed. Some clean, sweet hay
will be found a valuable addition to
Jhe ration at a very early ace.
Large, clean cotton rags wanted at
Times office. -
PRACTICAL HINTS PICKED UP IN ORCHARD
?a
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Wonderful Japanese Cherry Trees, Noted for Their Beauty.
come
you are ready to put them in the j
ground. When they arrive, soak the
roots a little while in cold water, then
examine carefully, and cut off every
damaged root. All dead wood or im
perfect growth should be cut off just
before the first outbranching rootlet,
Cut from under side in a slanting di
rection, so that the exposed surface
will come in contact with the ground.
In trimming the trees, do not leave
any branch more than eight inches
long. The practice of cutting back to
within two or three feet, particularly
on very young trees, is growing and
usually gives very satisfactory results.
In western Washington where fruit
growing now has become a great in
dustry, yearling trees are planted more
than any other. They are cut down to
about one-third of their growth, and
are every year trimmed to grow low
Bpreading branches. Most of the ap
ples in that country are picked by men
standing on the ground—ladders sel
dom being necessary.
Professor Bailey says that vigorous
pruning does not injure the growth
of the tree. Of course this does not
mean indiscriminate slashing of roots
or top, but pruning made with
care and good judgment. If the weak
rootB and branches are cut off, more
strength goes to the sound ones, and
better results are obtained.
Probably the best results come from
pruning the orchard rather vigorously
•very two or three years, but if one is
not an expert at pruning, and cannot
obtain the right sort of help, better
let the trees alone until they can be
properly pruned, even if this can be
done only once every three or four
years.
Peach trees which get frozen badly,
sometimes can be saved by cutting off
below the snow line, allowing them to
sprout again.
If you have not properly protected
the young trees from rabbits and mice
a walk through the orchard about this
time may give you some unpleasant
surprises.
Oyster shell bark louse attacks
apple trees mainly. Sulphur-lime
should be used when the leaves are
off the trees. If this spraying is in
effective use kerosene emulsion or
whale oil soap when the eggs hatch.
It will facilitate the work of plant
ing the orchard if the land is laid out
in straight rows the distance apart
the trees are to be planted.
The distance apart that trees are set
is governed by the kind and variety
to be planted.
Wounds on trees heal from the
downward flow of sap from the leaves,
and not from the upward flow of sap
from the roots.
Pick up and burn all twigs and
GRAIN LOUSE DOES CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE
:|:$s
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Excellent Results From Well-Cared For Field.
(By LEONARD HASEMAN. Missouri Ex
periment Station.)
The common grain louse la now
coming in for its share of attention
along with the army worm, the chinch
bug and the Hessian fly. It is a small
green or yellowlah-green louse which
collects in the head of wheat,
mature louse has wings. It attacks
wheat by sucking the sap. Injury to
^ripening wheat Is usually quite slight
The
have dropped from
trees, since they may contain injuri
ous insects.
In planting fruit trees, dig the holes
large enough to receive the roots v.-ith
out crowding.
Very few fruit growers realize the
amount of plant food a crop of fruit
extracts from the soil each year
A bill now before congress provides
that windfall apples shall not be
packed with picked fruit and regu
lates the size of packages requiring
a standard bushel box and a standard
barrel.
MATURE BREEDING
STOCK IS FAVORED
Pork From Small and Undevel
oped Animals Is Too Fat to
Meet Market Demands.
(By R. G. WF.ATIIERSTONE.)
Early maturity for the pork' barrel
is one thing and early maturity for
breeding purposes is quite another,
yet the two are closely related and it
is desirable that we consider them
together. The tendency must come
from the small or dwarf varieties.
But we may produce pigs with an
inherited tendency to make a rapid
growth from birth to the time they
are fit for market and at the same
time attain the size and vigor of our
matured breeding stock.
Another difficulty 1 have observed
in producing pork from the small and
undeveloped breeding animals is that
the pork is too fat to meet the market
demands, which call for a carcass that
will furnish pork that is well-marbled
with fat and lean meat, and this kind
of meat comes from pigs that are
from matured parents and that have
the inherited tendency to make growth
rather than to take on too much fat
at the period when they are being fin
ished for market.
The pigs from a well-developed 500,
pound sow will v make more pork In
less time than those from a young, im
mature sow. If this is not the case,
why are all of the phenomenal weights
made by the leading show' animals in
the under-a-year class maîé by pigs
that come from matured sires and
dams?
Selecting Draft Stallion.
Soundness should be the basis in
the selection of a draft stallion.
Good Combination.
Poultry and fruit make a good com
bination.
even though the pest may be abun
dant. This is not the much-dreaded
green bug which comes early In the
spring and which attacks the stems
and leaves of wheat," completely kill
ing the plant
The grain louse develops very rap
idly and when the weather la favor
able for its development and unfavor
able for Its enemies, it Is able to do
considerable damage to wheat
F.
am
NOTES FOR SWINE BREEDERS
Success With Pigs Cannot Be At
tributed to Luck—Model Farm
Should Have Natural Shade.
Progression is the order of the day,
and in no direction is there more prog
ress made than in the breeding and
feeding of swine.
The time is past when we can con
sider a man's success in swine grow
ing based upon luck.
Good drainage is essential on the
hog farm, and no amount of tile or ar
tificial draining will take the place
of good natural drainage.
While hills and valleys make an
Ideal place for a hog farm, the herd
should be kept as near to the source
of the water as possible because of
the danger of the stock becoming af
flicted with cholera and other diseases
caused by the stream being contami
nated by swine further up stream.
A model breeding farm should be
provided with a timber lot or large
There is no shade like nat
grove.
nral shade, and trees soften the cold
winds during the winter. Their value
cannot be overestimated when proper
ly utilized by the swine grower.
The breeder who would be success
ful in this age of close competition
must have the closest and keenest dis
crimination of what is necessary to
constitute an animal of individual
merit, or more properly he must have
firmly fixed in his mind the exact con
tour of a perfect pig. Then he must
have an idea of the kind of breeding
stock required to produce such a pig.
There are numerous breeds of swine,
varying not only in size, color, shape,
feeding qualities and general char
acteristics, but also in the quality of
their product.
It is not the great big fat pig that
brings home the money, but the pig
that will weigh from 200 to 300 pounds
at from six to ten months of age that
captures the top prices.
The breeding animals of the herd
should receive the very best care and
attention at all times, but with all of
our knowledge of breeding and feed
ing, the science of swine growing is
yet in its infancy.
KEEPING SWINE IN WINTER
Profit Can Be Made in Feeding Home
Grown Feeds, Such as Clover,
Alfalfa and Ensilage.
It is a common question to be asked
If It will pay to winter swine. I can
«ee but one way to winter swine at a
reasonable cost, and It is to winter
them on as cheap feed as is possible,
and make home-grown feeds, clover,
alfalfa and ensilage, form a prominent
part of the ration.
If we can winter an animal in this
way and feed out only a small amount
of grain I think we can make it profit
able to keep a number of pigs through
the winter and make fairly good
gains, but it is a common occurrence
•v
*
I
. ■ '
Winter Comfort for Little Ones.
to go on*a farm in the spring and see
100 hogs which will weigh the same
in May as they did in December, and
all of the corn cribs empty.
Something is wrong when wo see
that kind of hogs, but no one will dis
pute the fact that the average feeder
eithtr feeds out more feed than can be
fed with a profit or else has a bunch
of scrub pigs in the spring.
There is one advantage in wintering
pigs, we have them in time to feed out
and reap the benefits cf a good sum
mer market, and in that manner re
ceive considerable more money than
we would if we were compelled to mar
ket them while the market was over
stocked in November or December.—
J M. D.
Packing House Demands.
The demand at the packing houses is
for leaner pork and smaller weight
hogs. The feeders must cater to these
requirements by feeding less corn and
more protein feeds and shortening the
fattening period.
do
Give Pigs a Variety.
Feed fall pigs during winter a mod
erate ration of com and supplement
with bran, shorts and snch other ni
trogenous feeds as you have on hand
to give variety to the ration.
■ ■ ■
PROFESSIONAL OAIMA
F. A. WESTON
Architect, les. A. L Au.
I plan anything from bmiflww
skyscrapers. Specialty: Unbi '
construction. Present office at
Cor. Blue Lakes Blvd. and
Ave., Twin Falls, Idaho.
WHITE CROSS MATERNITY
Open for medical and maternity
Reasonable Terms
361 Fifth Ave. E.
Phone MA
DRS. ATHERTON and ATHERTHI
Practitioners of
Chiropractic and Sanitarium Tmb
ments.
Chronic Diseases a Specialty.
Phone 296.
Office 220 4 th Ave. East, Twin FMI m
Idaho.
DENTISTS.
DR. D. BROWN LEWERS
Dentist.
Specialist in Crown and Bridge Wwrh,
Over Varney's Candy Store
Guibert Building.
Telephone 109
TWIN FALLS
IDASÖ
ATTORNEYS.
NORTH & STEPHAN
Attorneys-at-Law
General Practice
Offi. over Clos' Book Store. Phone RM
E. M. WOLFE
Lawyer.
Office in I. D. Building.
TWIN FALLS
id Aim
ASHER B. WILSON
Lawyer
Practice in all courts.
Room 14 First National Bank
Twin Falls, Idaho.
Office Phone 96 Residence Phon«
SWEELEY & SWEELEY
Attorney s-at-Law
Will practice in all Courts.
TWIN FALLS
Member Twin Falls Comnicrlcal
IDtAHR
W. P. Guthrie
GUTHKIE & BOWEN
Attorney s-at-Law
Offices: Twin Falls Bank and Vial
Building
IDAHO:
TWIN FALLS
J. H. WISE, LAWYER
Office rooms 6 and 7, Twla Fal
Bank and Trust Co. Building
Twin Falls, Idaho.
UNDERTAKERS.
THE CROSBY COMPANY
Funeral Directors and Yishalanur.«
C. J. Crosby, Manager
Telephon« MF
Coroner's Office
Twin Falls, Idaho
P. J. GROSSMAN
Successor of C. J. Walker
UNDERTAKER
Open Day & Night. All Calls RespeuA
ed to Promptly. Private Ambul—
Harder Bldg. 230 Second Ave.
In Falls,
Phone 110.
DRESSMAKING
MRS. F. A. WESTON
First Class Dressmaking
At reasonable prices
Central Building.
SURVEYORS
J. C. PORTERFIELD, C. E.
Mining, Hydranlic and Structural
Work.
LICENSED LAND SURVEYOR
Room 13, First National Bank BaiUMg
Residence Phone 686W
FRATERNAL SOCIETIES.
M. W. A. CAMP
No. 10890
2nd and 4th Thursday
Moose Hall
H. C. SCRANTON Consul.
Telephone No. 369-J. Paul Smith, Clack*
Residence Phone 574.
S. G. HULL
Plano Tuner.
22 years experience in tuning, roMt|
and action regulating
and repairing
Office at Rogerson Hotel
P. O. Box 574
TWIN FALLS
IDAHC
IDAHO SOUTHERN RAILBOAMt
Train Schedule.
Effective May 17. 1914.
Daily No. 2. Stations. Dally Hm. X.
8:30 a. m. Lv. .Gooding. .Ar l:00*Bk.
8:45 a.m. Lv. .Bennett. .Ar 12:36 p. _
9:05 a. in. Lv.. WednelL.Ar 12:25 pus.
9:20 a.m. Lv..Admore..Ar 12:16 p.
9:35 a. in. Ar. .Jerome. .Lv 11:66a._
J. H. RADCIFFR,
General Passenger Agmtk
M1LNEK A NO 14 TH SIDE RAILROARk
Train Schedule.
Effective November 11, 1914»
Stations.
Datly No. 4.
11:45 a. m. Lv. .Milner.. Ar 5:06 *
12:20 p. in. Lv. Churchill.Ar 4:39* m.
12:30 p. m. Lv. Island.Ar 4:29 p. sa.
12:40 p. ni. Lv.. .Marion. .Ar 4:M p. at.
12:50 p. m. Ar. .Oakley. .Lv 4:M p.
J. H. RADCLIFFR.
General Paasenger Ageia*
Dally Nô. M
SCHEDULE
Twin Falls Electric RaHreai
Leave
O. 8. L. Depot
1:00 P. M.
3:30 P. M.
7:30 P. M.
Leave
Shoshone Cktfla*
....1:46 P. m
-6:0* r we
- 9:6» K Ur
Sully
9:30 A. M
1:00 P. M.
3:30 P. M.
7:30 P. M... » _ 9:6» p. Kf
Round Trip to ghoebOM Falla
40 CSSTS v , - ,
19:9» A. IE
. 1:46 P. *
. 6:99 F. IE
Sept 14, N914. In
m

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