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The Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, November 19, 1915, Image 8

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091218/1915-11-19/ed-1/seq-8/

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Q "/ wish I had ta ' cn time enough to have planned
the house a little more can fully.
Ç "/ realize note that it might have been more con
veniently arranged , and that it teould not have cost
any more to have had a modern looking and a highly
attractive outside appearance. "
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PLAN H9 ZI&
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<! Avoid h :ivin^ such regrets.
Q Our "C ustomers-Aid' Plan Book and Service
offers a variety of ideas, both as to the arrange
ment of rooms and us to exterior appearance.
We will combhie any of these ideas which may
appeal to you with any others that you may
already have, and make you a sketch without
any charge for doing so.
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€ This ; 'nci cly a part cf the service which
;:s modern b nitling supply merchants
dering to our customers.
<3 Our lumber ofliee is a clearii g house of build
ing ideas—the place to go for help in working
t "t your building problems.
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P L A N NO' 246
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46
GEM STATE LUMBER CO.
O 0 v t:
Merrill
C
.V O C I Ä t V 3
C. E. Lay, Manager.
Twin Falls Yards.
••»••••»•••••••«•••••a
••»••••»•••••••«•••••a
FILER NEWS
(From the Filer Journal.)
Geo. F. Allen has sold his Ford
and now rides about in an Oakland.
C. W. Case and Henry Brown are
in the hills this week looking for deer.
Mrs. Schildm&n and son, James,
leave Sunday for the big show at
San Francisco.
E. E. Landsberry and family will
move to Pocatello in a few days,
where they will make their home.
Harlan Fisher went to Lava Hot
Springs the first of the week, to
what could be done for his rheuma
tism.
The Birthday club met with Mrs.
Bidwell last week.
see
They were en
tertained at a sumptuous dinner and
apent a pleasant afternoon.
Joy waa thrown into the hearts of
the Browns and DetwilerB Tuesday
when a wire from Chicago brought
the pleasing news that their sheep
had topped the market at 9 cents.
At the Twin Falls Presbyterian
SATURDAY SPECIAL
40c Marshmallows 25c lb.
Ju»t Arrived—Strictly Fresh
V ARNE Y , The Live Candy Man
137 Main West
Phone 366
• /
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Invitesyouto see its officers when
you have any financial questions to
k decide. We are the oldest bank
■ the tract. %ur
■your disposal.
lyOST NATIONAL BANK OF TWIN FALLS
on
experience is at
manse on Monday, Nov. 1, Clarence
E. Lancaster and Miss Goldie Paxton,
both of this place were united In mar
riage.
P. W. Whlnery and Jas. Fitzgerald
both have new automobiles, and
strange as It may seem are able to
pass each other on the road. We did
not think the road was wide enough.
Filer station is about the busiest
one on the Short Line. So much to
do was the cause of the company hav
ing to send D. E. Sullivan of Twin
Falls to help Agent Truitt out last
Saturday.
Dennis Slattery left Monday for his
old home in the east. He will be
gone all winter. Dennis has been a
faithful worker and a big money mak
er since he has been on the tract and
can afford a vacation.
Rev. W. H. Warner, evangelist, will
conduct a series of religious services
in Filer, in the townslte building be
ginning Sunday, November 14, at 11
o'clock a. m. All are invited to at
tend and take part in these meetings.
P. G. Reilly, of Spokane was a Flier
visitor the first of the week. Mr.
Reilly was looking after business in
C. Pierce, and Miss Grace Lang a
cousin of Misa Dorothy Pierce, are
visiting here from Butte, Mont.
Frank Griffith has a fine lot of Jer
seya, no one ^doubts thi# for a mo- 1
terests here. A more genial Irish
man would be hard to find than this
wholesouled person, with his great
fund of wit, wisdom and general
cial qualities.
80 -
Brown Bros, of Twin Falls, Ida.,
recently purchased 1,000 head of fine
pure bred Shropshire ewes from Knol
lin & Finch, of Soda Springs, Ida., to
add to the small flock they already
have. They also breed Hampshires
and have a small flock of pure bred
ewes, besides handling a great many
grade sheep every year—Rural Spirit.
Rev- Flesher, of the Children's Home
Finding and Aid society of Boise, was
here Tuesday to supervise the loading
of the car containing donations for the
Home. The people responded very
generously as they always do for this
worthy cause. The children brought
in all sorts of things for the unfortu
nate kiddies who have no home, and
with charity in their hearts gave from
itheir plenty to those less favored
Mrs. Vandement visited several days
in Twin Falls last week.
Over 300 cars of spuds have been
shipped from this station this fall.
H. H. Schildman left for Chicago
Monday with his sheep.
Earl Wlalker spent Sunday in Bur
ley visiting his brother, Claude.
Chas. McCleary has converted the
old M. E. church into a fine bungalow.
H. W, Dryden and family have mov
ed back from Kimberly. We bet they
are glad of it.
Chris Snyder left with the trainload
of sheep Monday for a visit to his old
home at Hastings, Neb.,
Miss Ethel Kessler, of Twin Falls,
visited In Filer over Sunday as the
guest of Miss Clara Slater.
Frank Brown and wife of Twin
Falls attended the Eastern Star meet
ing and reception, Friday night.
Gilbert Gulick is building
barn north of town on his place. Hig
genbotham & Ellis are doing the work.
Jim Odell passed through town Mon
day morning with two loads of lum
ber. He will build a barn on his place
weat of town.
Lee Snelson has moved part of the
old postofflee building onto a lot west
of Ed Brennan's and will convert it
into a dwelling.
C. S. Orm has moved back from
Rogerson and rented the Filer hotel.
Chas. Bassford has rented the build
ing just south of the hotel.
Mrs. Cochrine, mother of Mrs. F.
a new
ment, and when his milk tests 5-6 at
the cheese factory they know he leads
the van.
One of the best thinks in the lec
ture line was delivered in the opera
house last night. Ralph Parlette is a
national figure and his lecture en the
"University of Hard Knocks" should
be heard by everybody in the land, es
pecially young men. It applies, how
ever, to all classes of people, and is
delivered in a manner that appeals
to you. His homely sayings and word
pictures are wonderfully drawn and
holds one from the time he starts
til he closes. He talked two hours
and could have held his audience
other hour easy. It is too bad that
a bigger audience was not present.
An intellectual treat does not seem
to appeal to Filer people to as great
an extent as it should.
Dr. Flesher, who had charge of
aflng the car with supplies for the
lirdren's home at Boise, heartily
thanked the people of this community
for their generous response, and also
all who kindly assisted in any way.
Besides many packages
fresh groceries and vegetables,
sacks of potatoes and 3 sacks and 4
boxes of apples were donated. The
railroad offers free transportation
until Dec. 1st for any gifts for the
home, and any sacks of vegetables
fruit carefully marked "Childrens
Home Boise," if delivered at this sta
tion not later than Thanksgiving week,
will be sent free of charge to Boise,
and any donation will be heartily ap
predated as the Society is now
ing for 100 homeless children and
only one-half of the expense of main
taining the two homes, Boise and
Lewiston, is met by the state. The re
mainder must be from donations and
gifts. An opportunity to give so easi
ly to this worthy cause will not be
granted this community again for
three years as the car will go to the
other sections for the following two
years.
un
an
lo
of useful
14
or
cor
HOGS AND IRRIGATION
Possibilities of the Industry Pointed
Out iu Government Report.
Farmers
on reclamation projects,
where forage and grain crops are the
chief crops are urged by the depart
ment to consider very carefully the
possibilities of raising hogs
means of converting crops into pro
ducts which will bear transportation
charges. An investigation of this
problem on the North Platte reclama
tion project, in western Nebraska and
eastern Wyoming, has led to the con
clusion that the swine industry can be
extended with great profit to the
community. Similar conditions it is
believed prevail on a number of other
projects.
On the North Platte, it is stated in
a report on this subject, there ap
pears to be no reason why the annual
exportation of hogs should not be de
veloped to a point where the result
ing revenue will represent an import
ant part of the farmers' receipts from
their crops. The demonstration work
which has already been conducted
with a view to extending and improv
ing the swine industry will, therefore
be continued. In particular, attention
is being bestowed upon arousing the
farmers to the necessity of commun
ity action in controlling hog cholera.
There is also, it is said, room for im
provement in feeding and housing
methods. Better results would be ob
tained if more grain were produced
and fed in connection with alfalfa
pasture.
In 1913 about 55 per cent of the
crop acreage on the North Platte pro
ject was devoted to alfalfa and about
32 per cent to grain. As in the case
of many of the other reclamation pro
jects, the cost of transportation from
the North Platte region to the large
market centers is so high that the
price paid to farmers for hay and
grain leaves only a small margin
of profit. In 1913 for example, the lo
cal price of alfalfa was from $3 to $5
a ton, and for different grains from 40
cents to 70 cents per bushel. Experi
ments conducted at the experiment
farm that year showed that alfalfa
when pastured by hogs had a value
equivalent to $35 a ton and that when
corn was hogged off its value as a
feed was from 90 cents to $1 a bush
el. These figures made it obvious that
it was, in general, more profitable for
the farmers on the project to convert
their alfalfa and corn into pork than
to attempt to dispose of them directly.
Local conditions also favor the de
velopment of the swine industry. For
age crops and grains can be produced
cheaply and abundantly,
tively little capital Is needed to
a start in the business, the returns
come promptly, and the swine popula
tion increases rapidly. Under these
conditions the four chief factors of
success In hog raising are declared
to be:
(1) The standardization of breeds
in the community.
(2) The adoption of satisfactory
methods of breeding, feeding, housing
and marketing.
(3) Adequate control of diseases.
(4) Community co-operation.
In developing these requisites, the
department has worked in co-opera
tion with the University of Nebraska
and the Nebraska State Live Stock
Sanitary Board. This
work has apparently borne good fruit,
for the number of hogs on the pro
ject rose from 14,000 on November 1,
1913, to 22,241 on November 1, 1914,
an increase of approximately 60 per
cent. In addition, a large number of
farmers have expressed their inten
tion of entering the business, and
many of those who now have herds are
planning to increase their size. There
are it is said, ample facilities for
producing all the feed that is nece
sary for four or five times as many
hogs as are now being grown.
About 10 per cent of the hogs on
the project are pure-bred and about
90 per cent grades of a fairly good
type. By far the greatest number are
,Duroc-Jerseys and, under the cir
cumstances, this breed is advocated
for the project because the uniform
adoption of one particular breed will
facilitvte improvements and econo
mies. Poland Chinas hire also been
found to do well but they are in the
great minority at present
|\factory if adequate shelter is provld
ad. Otherwise, however, large losses
as a
of
Compara
secure
in
co-operative
out
It is a common practice to raise two
litters a year, and this proves satis
at
a
is
occur in the fall litters during cold
weather. Fall pigs can be wintered
at comparatively low cost, but they
should be farrowed sufficiently early
to make a good growth before cold
weather. The following year they
can be economically fattened on grain
and alfalfa pasture and marketed soon
after midsummer. Spring pigs can ob
tain most of their growth from al
falfa pasture, with a 2 to 3 per cent
ration of grain increased in the /all.
In this way they can be finished for
market before Christmas.
An acre of alfalfa furnishes ample
grazing for twelve 100-pound shoats,
but with proper methods more can be
carried. The best results are obtain
ed from dividing the pasture into two
parts, using each' alternately. Ex
cessive pasturage -ho'ild be avoided
at all times. It is best to provide
more alfalfa than the hogs car. feed
down closely and to Clip the pasture
when the general alfalfa crop is cut.
When a grain ration of 3 pounds a
day for each 100 pounds of live weight
is fed, the most advantageous returns
from an acre of alfalfa are apparent
ly secured. With ordinary prices for
grain a 2 to 3 per cent ration can be
made profitable.
Corn is the principal grain used to
supplement alfalfa pasture and hay.
While the average yield in 1914 on the
project was only 15^ bushels per acre
a large number of farmers secured a
yield of 40 bushels and a few of
than 60 bushelB. Those farmers who
tried hogging down the corn in 1914
report very satisfactory results. This
method is an inexpensive way of har
vesting the corn, and it also adds a
considerable quantity of fertilizer to
the soil.
more
In the report recently pub
lished by the Department of Agricul
ture of the demonstration work on the
project, this method is strongly recom
mended for general adoption. The use
Vt self feeders is also recommended
and it is stated that twice
as many
were in use on the project in 1914
in 1913.
Denver is the chief market for the
fat hogs raised on the project, about
two-thirds of which are shipped by
the farmers themselves and one-third
sold to local buyers. Co-operative
shipping, It is said, might be profit
ably practiced to a greater extent than
it now is.
The chief problem, however, con
fronting hog raisers on the project
is the control of disease. The natural
conditions are such, it is said that the
health of the animals should be good
and their quarters easily maintained
in a sanitary condition. On the oUier
hand, the universal use of irrigation
water furnishes a ready channel for
disseminating disease and the only
way of overcoming this danger is by
means of community co-poeraUon.
Hog cholera appeared on the project
in 1913 and was widespread early In
1914. The campaign against the dis
ease was directed (1) toward the se
curing and enforcing of a quarantine
order; (2) to securing prompt reports
of all outbreaks in order to treat the
hogs in the infected hedrs; and (3)
to improving sanitary condition. Hogs
which showed visible symptoms of
sickness were either killed or placed
in a quarantine pen in order to pre
vent tjiem from spreading infection.
The other hogs in the exposed herds
were treated
with anti-hog-cholera
serum. Altogether, in the six months
from July 1 to December 31, 1914, 4,887
hogs were treated with the serum, the
average, therefore, for each hog that
died after treatment 5 hogs
ed. An outbreak of cholera in a herd
which is not treated frequently
suits in a loss of as many as 90 per
cent of the hogs. The total cost of
the treatment for the six months was
estimated at $2,400 and the saving at
$25,000.
While it evidently pays, therefore to
fight hog cholera with serum, it is
still more profitable ot take proper
precautions to see that it does not
appear.
were sav
re
Treatment with the
, serum
alone provides immunity for from 30
to 90 days only, and unless
proper
sanitary measures are taken, reinfec
tion is almost certain to follow. The
simultaneous treatment In which both
virus and serum are Injected Is open
to the objection that in incompetent
hands it may spread the disease. This
treatment should therefore be admin
istered only by experienced persons.
Since a diseased herd is a menace to
all the neighbors, the control of hog
cholera is distinctly a community mat
ter and neighborhood organizations
are recommended as an efficient way
of dealing with the problem. In fact
the swine industry as a whole, it is
said, should be regarded as a commun
ity affair. There are many ways in
which it will be profitable to all
con
cerned for the farmers on a project to
work together.
ADVERTISED LIST.
List of letters remaining unclaimed
in the Twin Falls postofflee for the
week ending Nov. 15, 1916. Parties
calling for these letters will please
say "advertised Nov. 1915, 1916."
Annis, Miss Grace M.
Andrews, Charlie.
Dorsten, Dick.
Hagar, Mrs. B. M.
Holpe, Louis.
Harris, Mrs. W. H.
Idaho Fruit & Produce Exchange.
Kelley, Fred.
Lacy, George E.
Lamurel, L.
Laris, Mrs. Ruby.
Midkiff, H. D.
McConnell, Jess.
Ohio Sales Co.
Quinlan, Dan.
Strahl, Miss Inez.
Thayer, Geo. W.
Wright, A. C.
Walcott, H.
Williams, Miss Helen
Ward, J. W.
Postage due on above letters one
cent each. Letters remaining at the
end of fourteen days will be sent to
the dead letter office.
M. A. STRONK, Postmaster.
When the nous« you ought to be llv
ug In now is vacated unexpected!)
>nd Is for 'ent, you'll get the new»
brough th. classified columns
Aggressive use of the classified col
umnes will rent good properties, In o>
out of seasons, and practically cut ou*
losses from vacancies.
Large, clean cotton raga wanted'»I
Tlayi office
PKUriHUW
F. Ju WESTON
Architect» I
I plan anything
skyscrapers. Sp<
construction. Pn
Cor. Blue Lakes
Are., Twin .Falls. Idahn,
DE. 0. W. SEARS
Osteopathic rtf
Acute and chronic dim
fully tYeati
Office Over Booth Ip
Fall«» IdS
Phones: Office IS« Sei
■ÎS4. L A.
rag! bungalow» 4
affif: Unburaa §k
»t7 office sit
r#' and Heyov
h
SUCCna,
: !
Nb Ce* T-*
learn *
INITT HO»-,
eternity
WHITE CB08S MATE!
Open for medical and f
Reasonable f
Ml Fifth Ave. E. F
Phono 6*»*-4
DBS. ATKEBTON and, ATHEBTtva ,
Practlt of
mJST** T "TÉ
Chronic Diseases à Specially
Phone SM. -,
Office 220 4th Ave. East, TwfnTF
Idaho.
Chiropractic and
DENTISTS.
DR. D. BROWN LEWE &8
Dentist. w
Specialist In Crown and Bridge »«,. *. !
Over Varney's Candy 8 torc
Guibert Building.
Telephone 109
TWIN FALLS
Itu-*"*
ATTORNEYS.
NOBTH A STEPHAN
Attorseys-st-Lsw
General PrscUce
Offl. over Clos* Book Store. Phone 1 j
E. M. WOLFE
Lawyer.
Office In 1. D. Building
TWIN FALLS
IDar-C
A 8 HEB B. WILSON
Lawyer
Practice in all courte.
Room 14 First National Bank h <^_
Twin Falla, Idaho.
Office Phone 96 Residence Phoor » «9
8 WEELEÏ A 8 WEELEÏ
Attorney s-at-La w
Will practice In all Couru .
TWIN FALLS - - - n/.f
Me mber Twlu Falls C ommerlcal ti
W. P. Guthrie
GUTHRIE A BOWEN
Attoraeys-at-Law
Offices: Shoshone Building
TWIN FALLS '
A M Be
1IV
J. n. WISE, LAWYER
Office rooms $ and 7, Twla 9
Bank and Trust Co. BuiUJld
_ Twin Falls, Idaho. 1
_SURVEYORS I
d. t. PORTERFIELD, cTË! ^
Mining, Hydraulic and Street*
Work.
LICENSED LAND BURVETt»
Room 13, First National Bank Bui
UealdencQ -Phop«
_UNDERTAKERS
THE CHOSBY COMPANY
Funeral Directors and Embai
C. J. Crosby, Manager
Coroner's Office Telephon*
_Twin Falls, Idaho
GROSSMAN AND EMES ~ J
Funeral Directors and Licensed 1
balmers.
All calls responded to promptly dal
night. Lady assistant. Large m
era chapel. Private ambulant
Brizee Bldg., 126-180 2nd Ave. E
Phones: Office 110, Res. 285 or lln
Twin Falls, Idaho.
Ill»
_L
_ PBESSMAK1NG
MBS. F. A. WESTON
First Class Dressmaking
At reasonable prices
Central Building
FRATERNAL SOCIETIES
IL W. A. CAMP ïES
No. 10896 M
»ad and 4th Thursday K
Moose Mall
H. C. SCRANTON Consai.
Telephone No. 369-J^ Paul Smith G M
Residence Phoney 674 .
twin falls lodge no. 4 »» 1 l ofI
Meets Second end Fourth Wedaeadel
of Month, 8 o'clock.
J. W. IRON, i j. p. JOHN 8 TO
c - c - K. R. and
1
. G. HULL
Plaie Taaer.
32 years experience In tuning, volet»*
and action regulating
end repairing
Office at Bogersoa Hotel
P. O. Box 574
TWIN FALLS
IDA "
IDAHO SOUTHERN UAILKoi*
Train Schedule.
Effective May 17, 1914
Dally No. 2. Stations. Dally N>
S:30 a. m. Lv..Gooding.. Ar l: 00 p*
«.45 a.m. Lv.. Bennett. .Ar l2:*5i»Ä.
9:06 a.m. Lv.. WednelL.Ar 13^26 la ^_
9:20 a.m. Lv..Admore..Ar 1S10 p a
9:36 a.m. Ar. .Jerome. .Lv lil;66
J. H. RADClin ..
_. General Passenger A««*'
4ILNER A 'Oi.TH SIDE RAILS«
Train Schedule.
„ ^relive November II, 1 » 14 .
Dally No. 4, Stations.
a e
• t»
.. .. , Dally N< t
*' ra Lt • Ar 5:05 a n
p ' m - Churchill.Ar 4:80 p #
12:80 p. m. Lv.Island.Ar 4:80 u n
12:40 p. m. Lv...Marlon..Ar 4:10 a »
12:50 p. m. Ar. .Oakley. .Lv 4:00 e «r
J. H. RADCLIFFE
_ General Passenger Ago.
SCHEDULE
Twla Falls Electric Ballraaj
Leave
S. L Depot
7:30 A. M.
1:00 P. M.;....
3:45 P. M..
9:80 A. M.
1:00 P. M.
8:30 P. M.
Leave
Bhoahon* Fait.
.8:00 A. M
.1:45 P M
.5:00 P. M
Sunday
10:00 A. M
1:4« P M
_ . 5:80 P. M
Bpecail rate of 25 cents round trip
tolpa ma< *® eac ** Saturday on all
Sept. 13, 1915. In effect nntll fnr
ther notice.
R. R- SPAFFOBD, Sec'y

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