OCR Interpretation


The Twin Falls times. [volume] (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, March 10, 1916, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091218/1916-03-10/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ZEPPELINS AGAIN
RAID ENGLAND |
Twelve Killed in Latest Raid Thirl}
three Injured—Fire Victims Vre
Children.
LONDON. Twelve persons were
killed and 33 injured in last night's
Zeppelin raid. Three Zippelins took
part in the attack. This information
was given out officially today.
The statement follows:
"The number of Zeppelins which
took part in last night's raid is now
believed to have been three.
"After crossing the coast, the air
ships took various courses/ and from
the devious nature of their flight ap
parently were uncertain as to their
bearings. The area visited Included
Yorkshire. Lincolnshire. Rutland,
Huntington, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk,
Essex and Kent.
"As far as is known, about 40 bombs
were dropped altogether. The casual
ties so far as ascertained amount to:
"Killed, three men, four women,
five children: injured, 33.
"The material damage was: Two
terrace houses practically destroyed ;
one office, one public house, a cafe,
and several shops partially destroyed
and a block of almshouses badly dam
aged,"
The censor permits publication of
a few incidents in connection with the
Zeppelin raid. In one of the principal
areas visited a block of workmen's
dwellings was demolished) A woman
and her four children, all under nine
years, were killed. The woman's hus
band was taken to a hospital in a
serious condition.
LEND PITS IN BOWSER SENTRY.
The Lind Auto company has put dn
a Bowser Sentry gasoline tank on
Main street, behind its garage, where
auto men can fill up their machines
without leaving the main thorough
fare.
»
! LET
j THOMPSON
DO IT
J

i
and it will be built right
Bungalows my Specialty
Æ
a
I'M
sV
s j :
t
t
ana'g tpi
jm

!*■
Sïo'.*'*'
-■ç
Ji
JËL
Better talk with me about that
NEW
HOME
PHONE J48.M
P. R. Thompson
CONTRACTOR
344 6th Avenue East, Twin Falls
Where WeKill
Building Cost.
Bet it would sur
prise you if you
knew how much
saving of materials
is made by the use
of our "Customers
AicT plans
^1 We are studying your
problems all the time—
studying the uses for
which different kinds of
lumber are best suited.
And that's why we
have so many satisfied
customers.
fl Let's plan together—then
you will appreciate the ser
vice of the—
GEM STATE LUMBER CO,
C. E. LAY, Manager
Twin Falls, Idaho.

POMONA GRANGE IN
HIIISOAIf DISTRICT
Near!} 10 0.Members Take Fifth Degree
Vt .Meeting Near Kden Interesting
Program is (liven.
EDEN "Butte Pomona Grange," Is
the name chosen by the members of
Hie new fifth degree Grange organized
at Hillsdale school house, Saturday,
March 4th, by C. E. B. Roberts of Ru
pert, treasurer of the Idaho State
Grange, wtlti about 1UU members. Ris
ing above the surrounding country,
old Skeleton Butte has always served
lanutnark for miles and miles.
as a
and it is the ambition of Butte Pom
ona to matte its influence serve as a
like guide in the development of this
section of the country. Its member
ship is composed of fourth degree
members from the subordinate
Granges of Russell, Lane
and Frontier
After a delicious dinner, followed
the election of officers and a pro
gram in charge of the state lecturer,
Mrs. Jas. C. Knott, who in introducing
the program, called the attention of
all patrons to the excellent
pages recently added to "The Nation
al Grange Monthly": "The Legisla
tive Work of the National Grange" and
"With the National Lecturer," and
urged that subordinate Granges sup
port the splendid work being done by
the "State Federation of Agriculture"
by subscribing to an active member
ship In the association.
The following program was greatly
enjoyed :
Grange Song, "Pomona," by the
members.
Recitation, Harriet Shannon.
Music by the Hillsdale Grange or
chestra, Mrs. Dentier, director.
Heading, Mrs. C. O. Greenwood.
Recitation by Mrs. Leroy Foster.
Darky ballard hy A. B. Rice.
Original poem, "Co-operation," by
John Gould.
Paper, "For the Good of the Order,"
Mrs. E. C. Bierbaum.
Address, "Grange Fire Insurance,"
J. P. Bates.
"Farmers' Mutual Telephone Co.,"
discussion opened by Mrs. Guy Dixon.
Grange closing song, by the mem
Hlllsdale
new
bers.
Following is a list of the officers
elected at the organization of the
Butte Pomona;
Worthy master, A.
overseer, Mrs, John L.
turer, Miss Elizabeth L. Gordon; ste
ward, Mrs. Whitney: assistant ste
ward J. O. Goss;
Reynolds ;
secretary, Mrs. E. C. Bierbaum; gate
keeper. J. Wilson; Ceres, Mrs. Dent
ier; Pomona, Mrs. Willey ; Flora, Mrs,
Alvah Clements; lady assistant ste
ward. Mrs. Raine.
J. P. Bates, secretary of the Grange
Fanners .muuai insurance Co., u,.u
steward of the Idaho State Grange,
explained fully the work of the com
pany and answered questions in re
gard to it. Agents have been appoint
ed in the various Granges and much
interest is being taken in this phase of
Grange work. Greatly appreciating
tlie tine hospitality of the Hillsdale
people, the executive committee voted
to hold the next meeting at Hillsdale,
Saturday, May 20, if the weather per
mits taking advantage of the kind of
fer of O. F. Allen to eat dinner and
hold the afternoon program in his
grove just across from the school
house. The Grange expressed its ap
preciation of the interest taken by Mr
Roberts in Us organization.
B. Hartley;
Gould; lec
K
chaplain, Mrs.
treasurer. J. B. Whitney;
PROPOSE ORDINANCE TO
SETTLE TELEPHONE DISPUTE
SALT LAKE.—In order to settle
once and for all the telephone situa
tion in Salt Lake county in regard
to charging toll for calls from one
exchange to another, it was suggested
this afternoon at a meeting between
representatives of the United Commer
cial Clubs of Salt Lake county and
county commissioners and representa
tives of the Mountain States Telephone
and Telegraph company that a county
ordinance bo enacted regulating terras
of services and rates, with the idea
in view that the ordinance would be
tested In the courts to establish the
status of existing authority in the
matter.
The county commissioners instruct
ed the county attorney to draft the
ordinance proposed by Attorney Carl
son and to send a formal request to
the telephone company for informa
tion and data to assist him in framing
the document. Mr. Carlson said he
has no doubt the company will gladly
furnish the information desired and
he thinks it will bring the matter to
an issue.
Dr. Emery said in his opinion the
telephone company is using as a "big
stick." ''to club the subscribers into
Une." the argument that the next state
legislature will undoubtedly pass a
law providing for a public utilities
commission and that then the sub
scribers will he compelled by law to
pay toll for inter-exchange calls.
DRUNKENNESS CAUSES MOST
TROUBLE, REPORT SHOWS
SALT LAKE.—Drunkenness puts
the city to more trouble and nearly as
much expense as all the other petty
offenses combined, according to the
monthly report of F. B. Hammond,
deputy clerk in the criminal division
of the city court, just filed. The total
number of cases on record .for Febru
ary is 408, of which 173 were charges
of drunkenness. Vagrancy ranks next
in number, there having been 129
charges filed. Other misdemeanors on
the record, such as disorderly conduct,
carrying concealed weapons and petit
larceny, make up the remainder of the
cases handled.
SEGREGATION OF THF
NEGROES IN ST. LOUIS
ST LOUIS.—Both the proposed
segregation ordinances were carried
at yesterday's election hy a malority
of 34,344, the vote being 62.220 for
segregation and 17,876 against.
One of the ordinances provides that
a negro may not become a resident
in a block occupied entirely by those
of opposite color. The other imposes
the same restrictions in blocks con
taining 75 per cent white or the like
percentage of negro residents.
MAYORS S1AND
FOR PREPAREDNESS!
Besolnlions Declare for Universal
Militarj Service and First \n>j in
the World.
ST. LOUIS, Mo.—A two-day confer
ence of mayors on national defense
closed Saturday night, with a banquet
at which the principal speakers were
" " 11 !>• : lain, tonner attor
United Stale.
Thompson i
Aiorgau oI
George
ney générai of tne
Mayor William Hale
Chicago, and Miss Anne
New I nrk.
Mayor Thompson said:
"Apparently as a people, we hav<
failed to profit hy our own experi
ence. The revoultionary war was won
by sheer audacity and a remarkable
display of nerve against tremendous
odds. The victory was no more due
to our ability than to our opponents'
assininity,
"Our civil war look an awful toll
from both sides, because neither was
prepared for that irrepressible conflict
It is a. reproach to us that we do not
learn from our own history.
"There Is not even a remote possi
bility that the people of this country
will ever bo called upon to wag'
a war of aggression on foreign soil.
but we may be called upon to defend
hearths and homes against
our own
Invasion.
"We may indulge in smug com
placency over our alleged neutrality,
but we cannot hide the ugly fact that
our people arc contributing to the
horrors of the conflict through the
stream of death-dealing munition go
ing from our shores to European hat
tlefields. Legally we are within our
rights in taking this business, but it
leaves us in a weak position to in
voke the Golden Rule if we should be
attacked
"A complication in our situation is
tlie powerful and crafty neigtibor that
has grown up in our west. Some day,
not far distant, demands will be made
upon us from that quarter which we
must refus. Shall we be able to de
fend our position? When that tiim
comes we shall have lo fight unless
our defense is made impregnable. We
invito aggression by our helplessness."
The conference at its final business
sessions adopted resolutions declaring
for universal military training, for a
navy that will make this country the
first naval power in the world, for
the locating of arsenals and munitions
plants at places distant from either
coast and from the Mexican or Ca
nadian borders, for the mobilization
of physical resources of the country,
for the standardization of all materials
used in war. for the organization of
transportation service for use.
The resolutions urge that congress
pass laws making the principles set
forth in the resolution effective.
APPEALS FOR FF EMISSION TO
Kill DFFFCT1VF ttVBF
DES MOINES. Iowa.—The action of
Dr. Harry J. Haiselden of Chicago in
permitting the death of the deformed
Bollinger baby, several months ago,
was recalled Thursday in this city by
Charles Cleveland, a laborer, who
asked the chief of police for assist
ance In killing his 2-months-old
daughter.
Cleveland spoke with discouraged
earnestness.
"Chief." he said, "won't you tell me
how I can kill my baby so it won't
be against the law. Maybe you'll help
me so it will be all right, like that
baby in Chicago."
"What's that? Say it a#;aln!" gasped
the chief.
"You see," went on Cleveland, "this
baby hasn't any regular mouth at all
and the doctors say that she might
not ever be able to eat regular food,
and, chief, she has fits all the time,
and my wife, she does nothing but cry
all the time and she's sick. So I asked
the doctors to kill Uie baby, but they
wouldn't because they said the police
wouldn't let them. So I came to ask
it you'd help me to do it all regular."
At Cleveland's desolate home the
city physjejan found the baby in con
vulsions and the mother in hysterics.
Ho instructed that both be taken to a
hospital. He said it would be impos
sible to operate on the infant during
the convulsions.
COPPER COMPANIES WILL
MAKE IMMENSE EARNINGS
SALT LAKE.—Based upon prices
and tonnage sold ahead, big returns
are in store for the shareholders of
all copper companies during the cur
rent year.
What high-priced copper means for
shareholders is reflected in the claim
that the total earnings of copper com
panies in this country, South America,
Mexico and Canada on a basis of 26,
cent copper and an average cost of 9
cents would reach the astounding to
tal of nearly $360,000,000 within a
period of 12 months.
Meetings of many of the porphyry
copper companies will be held in the
near future. Extra dividends would
not be at all surprising. All tlie
porphyry companies could adil to their
disbursements, particularly Utah and
Chino, but the matter of increases has
not been formally considered as yet.
GOOD WATER LIVE
ISSUE IN BUHL
E. A. Pearce who was up from Buhl
Friday on business said while here
that the interest in Clear Lakes water
and in the solution of the question of
pure water for the west end metro
polis was a live issue, the sentiment
being unanimously in favor of getting
water from tlie lakes if it would not
cost too much. The problem of a
filtering plant and other improvements
for the reservoir is being freely dis
cussed in Buhl, according to Mr.
Pearce. The council which retired
last year and of which he was a mem
ber. Investigated the cost of such
plant in connection with other im
provements incident to its successful
installation and found that it would
cost about $25,000.
THINGS BOOMING AT JARRIDGE.
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Manking were
! n this city Tuesday from Jnrhidge.
Mr. Manking says that everything a'
that town Is promising and that peo
ple there are especially enthusiastic
since a good strike In the Long Hike
mine, a couple of weeks ago.
RAIDER RETURNS TO
GERMANY SAFELY
Cruiser Startles World by Slipping
Through English Lines and Return
ing lo Home Port.
board 199 prisoners and
BERLIN. — The Gorman cruiser
Moewe arrived yesterday in a German
port, according to an official an
nouncement made here. She had on
1 , 000,000
marks in gold bars. The statement
follows:
"The naval general staff states that
S. M. S. Moewe, Commander Capt Bur
grave Count von Dohna-Scholdien,
after a successful cruise lasting sev
eral months, arrived today at some
home port with four British officers,
29 British marines and sailors, 166
men oi crews of enemy steamers,
among them 103 Indians, as prisoners
and 1,000,000 marks in gold bars.
"The vessel captured the following
enemy steamers, live greater part of
which were sunk and a small part of
which were sent as prizes to neutral
ports;
"The British steamers Colbridge,
3647 tons; Author, 3496 tons; Trader,
. , . . „„„„ . _
"60S tons; ^Ydnadno, .>035 tons; Dro
monby. 3627 tons; Farringsford, 3146
tons; Clan MacTavish, 5816 tons; Ap
P a ™. 7781 tons; Westburn, 3300 tons;
Horace, 3335 tons; Flamenco, 4629
tons; Saxon Prince, 3471 tons.
"The British sailing vessel Edin
burgh, 1473 tons.
"The French steamer Maroni. 3109
töa ;U _ , ,
,,P 10 Belgian st®8*ner Luxembourg,
tons -
"At several points on enemy coast
Moewe also laid mines to which,
«mong others, the battleship King Ed
ward VII. fell victim.'
The Moewe first became famous
when the Appam reached Newport
News with a story which astonished
'he world. It was learned that the
commerce raider had captured and
sunk seven British vessels in the main
Une, of traffic between South Africa
an(1 Europe in addition to seizing the
Appam, which had almost been given
U P f or ' os L
The next heard of the German raider
was on the arrival at (.anary islands
" l * 1 ' month of the 'Westburn in
j
charge of a German prize crew. It was
then made known that the Moewe had
sunk five more steamships off the
coast of Brazil.
The Saxon Prince and Maroni prob
a'o'.y were captured by the Moewe on
her way back to Germany, as their
sailing dates show they were both on
the high seas toward the end of Feb
ruary.
Tiie identity of the Moewe has not
hern established here definitely. Pris
oners from captured ships which were
transferred to the westbound said on
their arrival at the Canary islands
that the Moewe's guns were smaller
l ^ an seven inches. According to one
| was fomer,y a tramp
a repetition of »our want ad. In the
course of your quest for a cook, may
•<e good policy
V'

H
.

i
e
You will realize the very first time you
ride in this car that it has all the comfort,
responsiveness and power you want in a car
4
*
I
±
£
I
$
■ \
There will be no mistaking the buoyant
spring action—the marked freedom from
gear shifting—the swiftness with which
the car gets under way—the fine balance
which makes it stick to the road, or the
dogged pulling power of the silent motor
\
i
I
I
The wheelbase is 110 inches
The price of the car complete is $785
f. o. b. Detroit
I
\l

< i

I
k


Pt
:
I
i.J
\
<(•
±:
A -

.)■
I
I
$
iti
h.
<
-
II
Lind Automobile Co.
<
Vi
\\
T *
Oldest Garage and Automobile Firm in Southern Idaho
Twin Falls—Phone 299
rr
U
U
u
Vi
r
T
itaa astëtsaaa aaaaa- :■
r-ir
PEACE HOPELESS IN
EUROPE SAYS HOUSE
Personal Representative
President's
Returns and Reports, After Visit to
Foreign Capitals.
WASHINGTON.—Col. E. M. House,
who returned yesterday from Europe,
is understood to have told President
Wilson that he found no more pros
pects for peace during his recent visit
to the capitals of belligerent nations
than he did on his visit last spring.
The president and Col. House talked
so long this morning that the presi
dent was forty minutes late keeping
his first engagement at the executive
offices, a very unusual proceeding for
him.
Col. House today parried questions
as to the status of the armed ship
controversy with the statement that
those in Washington knew more about
the subject than he did. He absolutely
refused to discuss any pending dip
lomatic questions or to comment on
the foreign situation.
When Col. House left for Europe
reports were persistent that he went
abroad to investigate the peace situa
tion, but that was emphatically denied
by President Wilson and Secretary
Lansing.
It was understood today that Col.
House expressed great admiration for
the way American diplomats abroad
were carrying on their work. He told
the president in detail about the state
of public sentiment in Germany,
France and England, and is under
stood to have had much to say on the
feeling in Germany in support of the
submarine policy.
At VARNEY'S THIS WEEK
NIFTY MIXED
18 c lb.
*
:
THE AUTOPIANO
Maxie by the largest factory in the world devoted exclusively lo
player pianos. Used almost exclusively by the Army and Navy.
Sold in Idaho only by
The Boise Filers Music House
a
JUDGE SHANK TO GO
TO BUHl TO LIVE
Intimates That He Will Resign
Has Fallen Heir to Property and
Will Fnter Business in Bnhl.
The county commissioners at their
session Saturday were surprised by
the statement from Judge Jacb Shank,
that he might resign his position in
the near future and go to Buhl to live
and enter business, and that it would
be up to them to select a successor.
It had been known for some days that
Judge Shank was contemplating mov
ing to Buhl, but the intimation that
he expected to resign before the ex
piration of his term was not known.
Judge Shank recently fell heir to a
large amount of property in Buffalo,
N. Y., and it is understood that he in
tends to Invest part of it in a business
enterprise in* the west end city where
he resided before being elected to his
present office.
LET THE RULES REMAIN
AS THEY WERE
United States Attorney McClear has
been informed of an attempted in
fraction of the rules of the postal de
partment at Fairy Lawn, Ida. A man
appeared at the postoffice and began
to look over the mail before it was
distributed. He was told that such
inquisitiveness was against the rules
of the department. Grabbing a three
inch pipe, he announced that the rules
would be changed then and there. The
assistant postmaster seized a revolver
and asserted that there would be no
change in the rules at present. The
inquisitive man dropped his pipe and
concluded to defer his amendment.

xml | txt