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The Twin Falls times. [volume] (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1905-1916, June 13, 1916, Image 6

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HAVE YOUR PAINTING
FIGURED ON
NOW
Telephone 43 and I will
give you an estimate
Geo. F. Bemiller
230 Second Ave. E..
GLASS-GLASS
All Sizes Carried
In Stock.
E. A. MOON
Shop near P. O.
Erickson's
REG LIVERY
Six Cylinder Seven-Passenger
Car.
Night Phone
535-J.
Day Stand
Perriae Corner.
BATH I NO
Every day and night al Arte
sian City—a pleasant auto.
Dance Wednesdays-fSaturdays
Aul« Stages 8:30 a. m.—1:30 p. in.
TeL 151—Round Trip Party Rates.
Auto Livery
Ed A. Minncrly—Rogcrson Hotel
NIGHT 415-J
PHONE 84
O A.N C E
Every Wednesday and Satur
day nights nt Artesian City—
and "(lie Water's Fine''.
Aal« Stages 8:30 a. in.—1:30 p. in.
TeL 1Ö1 —Round Trip Party Rates.
+
Cash Supply Store
of Jarbidge, Nev.
W. H. HUDSON, Proprietor.
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
FEED STABLES,
All Kinds of Transportation
Furnished Promptly.
♦+4- <•■«••«•+++++++•:•+++++++♦+++•»
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Grassy Hill
Homesteads'
Y
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; Let us locate you on a 320-acre
Homestead on Grassy Hill.
U TO SERVICE
■ ; S. C. & B. W. Turnipseed
FILER. IDAHO.
Tel. 507-J-5, Twin Falls.
&
Fly Time
Have your screens repaired or
replaced nidi new ones
•Screen doors made to order at
MOON'S SHOP
Near Posloffice.
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X Summer School! Summer School!
HALF RATES

4.
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Students prepared for the following positions;
Bookkeeper, Typist.
Federal positions: First Grade Clerk, Railway Mail Clerk, Letter
Stenographer,
- .*
Carrier.
Speed practice in all systems of shorthand.
Classes formed in French and Spanish.
Students, backward in studies, can review.
é
t
Summer Session May 16 to September 1, 1916
Winter Session September 1 to May 15, 1917
Eight students accepted positions in three months. You can enroll
at any time.
TWIN FALLS BUSINESS COLLEGE
CHAS. E. TAYLOR, Principal,
TURMOIL
A Novel By
BOOTH TARK.INGTON
Author of
Monsieur Beaucaire,"
Conquest of Canaan, "
"Penrod," etc.
The
SSHSeSSSHSBSHSHSESESaSîSHSHSaStîlj
Copyright UU. by Harper A JJrvUusn
SYNOPSIS.
y ,l<
CHAPTER I—Sheridan's attempt to
make a business man of his son Bibbs by
starting him In the machine shop end« In
Bibbs going to a sanitarium, a nervous
wreck.
CHAPTER II—On his return Bibbs Is
met at the station by his sister Edith.
CHAPTER HI—He finds himself an In
considerable and unconsidered ligure In
the "New House" ot tlie Sheridans. He
sees Mary Vertrees looking *#-t him from
a summer house next door.
chapter IV—The Vertreeses, old town
family and
mpoverished, call on the
Sheridans, newly-rich, and afterward dis
cuss them. Mary puts into words her
parents' unspoken wish that she marry
one of the Sheridan boys.
CHAI TER V—Al the Sheridan house
warming banquet Hheridan spreads him
self. Mary frankly encourages Jim Sheri
dan s attention, and Rlbbs bears he is to
be sent back to the machine shop.
CHAPTER VI—Mary tells her mother
about the banquet and shocks her moth
er b .Y.,î°l kin £ of Jirn as a matrimonial
possibility.
CHAPTER VII—Jim tells Mary Bibbs
Is not a lunatic—"Just queer." He pro
poses to Mary, who half accepts him.
CHAPTER VIII—Sheridan tells Bibbs
he must go back to the machine shop aa
" -, as .he strong enough, in spite of
Bibbs plea to be allowed to*wrlte.
IX—Edith and Sibyl, Roscoe
bheridan's wife, quarrel over Bobby Lam
horn; Sybil goes to Mary for help to keep
Larnhorn from marrying Edith, and Mary
leaves her in the room alone.
CHAPTER X—Bibbs has to break to
his father the news of Jim's sudden death.
CHAPTER XI—All the rest of the fam
ily helpless in their grief. Bibbs becomes
temporary master of the house. At the
funeral he meets Mary and rides home
with her.
soon
XII—Mrs. Sheridan pleads
wkh Bibbs lo return to the machine shop
for his father's sake, and ha consents.
CHAPTER XIII—Bibbs purposely Inter
rupts a tete-a-tete between Edith and
Larnhorn. He tells Edith that he over
heard Lamhurn making love to Roscoe's
wife.
CHAPTER XIV—Mutual love of music
arouses an intimate friendship between
Bibbs and Mary.
CHAPTER XV-Mary sells her piano to
help out tlie finances of tile Vertrees lam
lly.
CHAPTER XVI—Roscoe and his wife
quarrel over Larnhorn.
CHAPTER XVII—Sheridan finds Ros
coe In an intoxicated condition during of
fice hours and takes him home.
CHAPTER XV1I1—Friendship between
Bihbs and Mary ripens into a inure inti
mate relation, and under Mary's inllu
ence Bibbs decides to return lo the ma
chine shop.
CHAPTER XIX—Sheridan finds his son
Roscoe's affairs in a muddled condition,
owing lo his intemperate habits.
CHAPTER XX.
Who looks a mustang in the eye?
Changety, chang, chang! Bash! Crash!
Bang!
So sang Bihbs, his musical gayeties
inaudible to his fellow workmen be
cause of the noise of the machinery.
He had discovered long ago that the
uproar was rhythmical, and it had
been intolerable; but now, on the aft
I ernoon of tlie fourth day of his return,
lie was accompanying the swing and
clash of tlie metals with jubilant va
quero fragments, mingling improvisa
tions of his own among them, and
mocking the zinc eater's crash with
vocal imitations;
Fearless and bold,
Chang! Bash! Behold!
With a leap from the ground
To the saddle in a bound,
And away—and away!
Ml-yay!
Tlie long room was ceaselessly thun
dering with metallic sound; the air
was thick with tlie smell of oil; the
floor trembled perpetually: everything
was implacably in motion—nowhere
was there a rest for the dizzied eye.
The first time he had entered tlie place
Bihbs had become dizzy instantly, and
six months of it had only added in
creasing nausea to faintness. But lie
felt neither now. "All day long I'll
send my thoughts to you. You must
keep remembering that your friend
stands beside you." He saw lier there
beside liiin. and the greasy, roaring
place became suffused with radiance.
The poet was happy in his machine
shop; he was still a poet there. And
he ted liis old zinc eater, and sung:
Away—and away!
iy!
crash, bash, chang!
his eyes,
he dies!
Crush, hash.
Wild nr
Fier cl:
IL
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bang! Bash, chang!
C—
b
'Ready to ding"
Our gloves In the ring—
"1 like the machine," said Bibbs.
"I've made a friend of It. 1 serenade
and talk to it, and then It talks back
to me."
"Indeed, Indeed? What does it say?"
"What I want to hear."
He was unaware of a sensation (hat
passed along (he lines of workmen.
Their great master had come among
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"I'm Not Drinking Because I've Got a
Thirst."
them, and they grinned to see him
standing with Doctor Gurney behind
the unconscious Bibbs. Sheridan nod
ded to those nearest him—lie had per
sonal acquaintance with nearly all of
them—hut he kept his attention upon
his son. Bibbs worked steadily, never
turning from his machine. Now and
then he varied his musical program
with remarks addressed to the zinc
eater.
"Go on, you old crash-basher! Chew
it up! It's good for you, if you t'on'1
try to bolt your vlttles. Fletcherize,
you pig! That s right—you'll never
get a lump in your gizaurd. Waut some
more? Here's a nice, snlny one."
The words were indistinguishable, but
Sheridan inclined his head to Gurney's
ear and shouted fiercely: "Talkin' to
himself! By George!"
Gurney laughed reassuringly, and
shook his head.
Bibbs returned to song.
Chang! Chang, bash, chang! It's I!
Who looks a mustang la the eye?
Fearless and bo—
His father grasped him by the arm.
"Here!" he shouted. "Let me show
you how to run a strip through there.
The foreman says you're some better'n
you used to be, but that's no way to
handle— Get out the way and let me
show you once."
"Better be careful." Bibbs warned
him, stepping to one side.
"Careful? Boh'!' Sheridan seized
a strip of zinc from the box. "What
you talkin' to yourself about? Tryin'
to make yourself think you're so
abused you're goin' wrong in the
head?"
" 'Abused?' No!" shouted Bibbs. "I
was singing—because I 'like It!' I told
you I'd come back and 'like it.' "
Sheridan may not have understood.

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"You Go Back to Your Work."
At all events, lie made no reply, hut
began to run tlie strip of zinc through
(lie machine. He did it awkwardly—
and witli bad results.
"Here!" lie shouted,
way. Watch how I do It.
nothin' to it, if you put your ml ml on
it." By liis own showing then his mind
was not upon it. He continued to talk.
"All you got to look out for Is to keep
it pressed over to—"
"Don't run your hand up with It,"
Bibbs vociferated, leaning toward him.
"Run nothin'! You got to—"
"Look out!" shouted Bibbs and Gur
ney together, and they both sprang for
ward. But Sheridan's right hand had
followed the strip too far, and the zinc
eater had bitten off the tips of the first
and second fingers. He swore vehe
"This is tlie
There's
mently, and wrung his hand, sending a
shower of red drops over himself and
Bibbs, but Gurney grasped his wrist,
and said, sharply;
"Come out of here,
the lavatory in the office. Bibbs, fetch
my bag. It's In my machine, outside."
And when Bibbs brought the bag to
the washroom he found the doctor still
grasping Sheridan's wrist, holding the
Injured hand over a basin. Sheridan
had lost color, and temper, too. He
glared over his shoulder at his son as
the latter handed the bag to Gurney.
"You go on back to your work," he
said. "I've had worse snips than that
from a pencil sharpener."
"Oh, no. you haven't!" said Gurney.
"I have too!" Sheridan retorted, an
grily. "Bibbs, you go on back to your
work. There's no reason to stand
around here watch in' ole Doc Gurney
tryin' to keep himself awake w'orkin'
on a scratch that only needs a little
courtplaster. I slipped or it wouldn't
happened. You get back on your job."
"All right," said Bibbs.
"Here!" Sheridan bellowed, ns his
son was passing out of the door. "You
watch out when you're runnin' that
machine! You hear what I say? I
slipped, or I wouldn't got scratched,
hut you—you're liable to get your
whole hand cut off! You keep your
eyes open!"
"Yes, sir." And Bibhs returned to
the zinc eater thoughtfully.
Half an hour later Gurney touched
him on the shoulder and beckoned him
outside, where conversation was pos
sible. "I sent him home. Bibbs. He'll
have to be careful of that hand. Go
get your overalls off. I'll take you
for a drive and leave you at home.
"Can't," said Bibbs. "Got to stick
to my job till the whistle blows."
"No, you don't," the doctor returned,
smothering a yawn. "He wants me to
take you down to my office and give
you an overhauling to see how much
harm these four days on the machine
have done you. I guess you folks have
got that old naan pretty thoroughly
upset, between you, up at your house!
But I don't Intend to go over you. I
can see with my eyes half shut—"
"Yes," Bibbs interrupted, "that'«
what they are."
"I say I can see you're starting out,
at least, in good shape. What's made
the difference?"
"I like tlie machine," said Bibbs.
"Weil, well! ' The doctor stretched
himself and stamped his foot repeat
edly. "Better come along and take a
drive with me. You can take the time
off that he allowed for the examina
tion, and—"
Come over to
"Not at all," said Bibbs. "I'm going
to stand by the old zinc enter till live
o'clock. I tell you I like it!"
"Then I suppose that's the end of
your wanting to write."
"I don't know about that." Bibbs
said, thoughtfully; "but the zinc eater
doesn't Interfere with my thinking, at
least. It's better than being in busi
ness: I'm sure of that. I don't want
anything to change. I'd be content to
lead just the life I'm leading now to
the end of my days."
"You do beat the devil!" exclaimed
Gurney. "Your father's right when he
tells me you're a mystery. Perhaps
the Almighty knew what he was about
when he made you, but it takes a lot
of faith to believe it! Well, I'm off.
Go on back to your murdering old ma
chine." He climbed into his car,
which he operated himself, but he re
frained from setting it immediately in
motion. "Well, I rubbed it in on the
old man that you had warned him not
to slide his hand along too far. and
that he got hurt because he didn't pay
attention to your warning, and because
he was trying to show you how to do
something you were already doing a
great deal better than he could. You
tell him I'll be around to look at it
and change the dressing tomorrow
morning. Goodby."
But when he paid the promised visit
the next morning he did more than
change the dressing upon the damaged
hand. The Injury was severe of its
kind, and Gurney spent a long time
over it. though Sheridan was rebellious
and scornful, being brought to a de
gree of tractability only by means of
horrible threats and talk of amputa
tion. However, he appeared at the
dinner table with his hand supported
In a sling, which he seemed to regard
as an indignity, while the natural in
quiries upon tlie subject evidently
struck him ns deliberate insults. Mrs.
Sheridan, having been unable to con
tain her solicitude several times dur
ing the day. and having been checked
each time in a manner that blanched
her check, hastened to warn Koscoe
and Sibyl, upon their arrival at live,
to omit any reference to the injury and
to avoid even looking at the sling if
they nossiblv could.
(To be continued.1
WIND AFFECTS CONSUMPTION
OF GASOLINE IN AUTOS
Motorists who complain of the high
price of gasoline should have a few
harsh words to say for Old Boreas.
The god of the winds, as shown by
tests conducted during the past week,
increase the gas consumption fully
forty per cent when he is at work with
ordinary velocity: when he is really
trying, Mr. Wind undoubtedly makes
his batting average much higher.
E. E. Thompson, president of the
Thompson-La Casse company at Fres
no, kept a careful check on wind and
gasoline when he made the run from
tlie Raisin City to San Francisco. The
trip north was made on Tuesday, and
the return journey Thursday, and
order to learn if the wind velocity
was anywhere near the same Mr.
Thompson inquired at the govern
ment weather bureau regarding condi
tions on the two days. The official
report was that the wind speed was
approximately the same.
Coming up the valley from Fresno
the Thompson Maxwell touring car
showed what its owner thought was a
mighty poor gasoline average. On the
197-mile run nine and a half gallons
of fllud were used. This meant that
the carburetor took a gallon of gaso
line for each 20.7 miles of the road
covered.
Going home the fuel consumption
absolutely different tliaf Mr.
was so
Thompson paused to inquire, and fin
ally placed the blame with Boreas.
However, road conditions going south
from the Bay City were also forced to
shoulder part of the blame, for the
"roll" is all in favor of the south
The Maxwell used up
bound run.
just five gallons and one gill of gaso
line.
"Motorists looking for high gaso
line averages want to consider the
wind as a mighty strong factor," said
Mr. Thompson. "I have made the
Fresno-San Francisco run hundreds
of times, but not until recently did I
pay much attention to fuel consump
tion. The difference between the
northern and southern runs was so
pronounced that it could hardly be
laid to the grade conditions, and not
until I thought of the wind was I able
to place the blame."
Motorists will find that the above
conditions are quite similar in Idaho,
as E. S. Johnson of the Johnson Auto
Sales Co. has made several tests of
this nature.
Chautuaqua On Business Basis
Until a person looks over the list of
chautauquas that are being held in all
parts of the United States this sum
mer, the magnitude of the Chautauqua
business is hardly grasped. The Chau
tauqua has probably shown a great
er growth than any other institution
of modern times and each year the to
tal Chautauqua attendance has in
creased two hundred per cent over the
preceding year. 1916 will see a great
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J. H. McNICHOLS & CO.
PHONE 200
Transfer & Garbage Hauled at
Reasonable Prices
- 4 —+-+-+-+-+- 4 —
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TO TRADE FOR :
SALMON LANDJ
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Four and Eight Room Houses; Busi
ness and Resident Lots in Mountain
Home, Idaho.
i
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t
acre dry farm in section
where dry farming is no experiment, for
Twin Falls city property.
Also 160
O. P. DUVALL
•—4--+—4.-4.—4.—4.—4—4.—*F
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A soft drink—an achievement of masterful and scicntic brew
Ualiitahle and wholesome it is fast becoming (he accepted re
freshment of the inter-mountain west.
Have a few bottles sent home today—test Its taste and quality
at leisure.
Ing.
SERVE ICE COLD
THE SALT LAKE CITY BREWING CO.
Blue Lakes Bottling Works
DISTRIBUTORS
Twin Falls,
Idaho
than ever and the five'
er Increase
thousand two hundrod American chau
tauquas, it Is estimated, will be at
tended by no less than fifteen million
people.
To keep these chautauQuas in opera
tion requires the services of many
hundreds of people and the list of men
and women who devote all or part of
the summer months to this kind of
work, includes many of America's
notables. Besides the hundreds of
musical attractions, lecturers and en
tertainers, there are many hundreds
of advance men, college crew boys and
other assistants who manage the im
dctail of the chautauquas.
mense
The Chautauqua of today is operated
strict business basis and unlike
other movements of the present
on a
many .
day, the Chautauqua pays its bills and
financially is a success. When it is
understood that fifteen millions of
dollars were spent last year in pro
moting the chautauquas of the United
States, it will be readily understood
that the Chautauqua is exerting an in
fluence not only in hundreds of com
munities but throughout the nation as
institution that is making good on
—Advertisement.
n
a business basis. ,
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HAIN ST OPPOSITE HEARNS BLDG.SALT LAKE CITT
131
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