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The Pioche weekly record. [volume] (Pioche, Nev.) 1877-1900, June 16, 1877, Image 1

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PiOCHE WEEKLY RECORD,
Published eycry Saturday by
RECORD PUBLISHING CO.
omOE: WARD'S BUILDING-, MAIN STK8ET,
OPPOSITE HALFIN'3 STOKE.
TERMS i
On yew, by Mill or Ejpress
glx Months
Nona forwarded till pa 1.1 for.
THIS PWOKU
Is delivered in Plocha and Bullionvllle at 25
cents per week, payable to the Carriers.
All persona having buaineua with this office are
requested to address the Kkcouu Puiilihhiso
Company. Wo have no authorized Agents.
THE PIOCHE WEEKLY RECORD.
VOL. XIV.
PIOCHE, NEV., SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 1877.
NO. 14
LOST M1NEN.
A Diimbfcrof stories of "lost divings"
have reoently been t o!. The Sliusts.
Courier of lale dutt-s liiiH contained a
number of items regarding the itrmndorj
inent of rich r. mots discovered in enrly
times, never t Ve (outid again. Toe
Trinity J.'ri-.'.jN hs Mo: f
ncciJi-atu'i Cu?.u. m noli di'(ju:-it by
two men in 1S51, which bus never been
recognized since. It,uppeir from the
Journal's nccoaut t hut ilia meu, tiiliiuR
with the in a mule, carrying u rocker,
cooking and mining utensil, find pro
visions, gtttrled for the Sitlmon River
disaiuH from the lower purt o( th State,
and leaving tho usually traveled route
Btruok aorosu the mountains. B-int!
delayed by no accident to tbe mule they
oneauiped at a certain place, minutely
' described, and prospecting the gravel
found unci) good results that they gave
uo their journey for the time?, built a
brush corral and etayed there a month.
At tbe end of that time being out ot pro
visions they left their camp, and on ar
riving at Shasta oach found letters re
quiring his presence elsewhere.. The
8'cret was kept until the death of one of
the men. when the other (ave directions
for finding the spot. The brush corral
is supposed to have been encountered
once again by a man who had lost his
way in the mountains, but tires in tbe
same year probably swept it away, thus
destroying tbe chief lund mark.
Another story is of a discovery made
between Soda Springs, on, the Sacra
mento, and the McCloud river mining
camp. A party of four on their way
ovtr tbe mountains, came across good
prospects, and one of the party was
tempted to remain a short time while
the others pushed on. Indians were
numerous and hostile at that time, and
they never returned to the place where
their companion bad stopped. Meeting
him subsequently they learned that the
prospects be had taken out amounted to
five dollars in an hour's panning. Nei
ther of tbe four, however, rocollected
the route taken from Sacramento with
sufficient exactness to have any hope of
finding tbe place again and were quite
positive that no one else bas ever since
then come across it.
From Chile comes a report of the dis
cevery of the lost Cristales gold mine,
once famous for its enormous yield in
colonial times, but lost for the past forty
years. At the beginning of the Chilean
revolution it rilled with water, and then
a land-slide removed all traces of it.
Such stories are common in every min
ing camp. A great many are undeniably
true, but it seldom happens that any
snccss attends the search for diggings
once lost. Miners can spin these yrans
by the hour and believe them too, bui
they do not often go in search of tbe
"lost diggings." 8- F. Stock Report.
ANCIENT COLORADO.
There has been recently discovered in
th- (Vrcile valley of the Animas, in Soutli
Wfst.rii Colorado, ihe ancient ruins of a
once extensive and populous city, indi
cating the presence centuries ago o! au
highly cultured and enlightened race
of people. The ruins of the houses,
corrals, towns, fortihuations, ditches,
pottery ware, drawings, non-interpreable
writings, etc., show that many arts were
cultivated by these prehiatorio peo
ple, which are now entirely lost.
Their houses are built of most every
kind of stone, from small boulders to tbe
Quest sandstones. This valley has been
covered with buildings of every size, the
two largest being 300 by 0,000 feet, and
about 300 (nit opart. They are built of
small blocks of sandstone, laid in adobe
mud, the outside wall being four feet,
au i Ihe iuside wall from a foot and a
half to Ihree feet thick. In tbe lower
story are found port-holes a foot square.
No signs of a door are visible in the
outer walls, and the ingress must have
been from the top, in the inside there
b.-ing passages from room to room. Most
of them are small, from 8 by 10 to 12 by
14 feet, tbe doors being 2 by 4 feet. The
arches over tbe doors and port-holes are
made of small cedar poles two inches
vide, placed ncrons, on which tbe mas
onry is placed. Tbe Bleepers supporting
the floors are of cedar, about eight inches
thick, and from twenty to fifty feet long,
and about 3 feet apart. A layer of small
round poles was then placed serosa tbe
sleepers, then a layer of thinly-split
cedar sticks, then about three inches of
earth, then a layer of cedar bark, then
another layer of dirt, then a carpet of
some kind of coarse grass. The rooms
that have been protected from exposure
are whitewashed, and the walls are orna
mented with drawings and writings. In
one of these rooms tbe impression of a
hand dipped in whitewash on a joist is
as plaiu as if it bad been done only
yesterday. In another room there are
drawing of tarantulas, centepedes, horses
and men.
In some of the rooms have been found
human bones, bones of Bheep, corn-cobs,
goods, raw hides, and all colors and va
rieties of pottery ware. These two large
buildings are exactly tbe same in every
respect. Portions of tbe buildings plain
ly show that they were destroyed by fire,
the timbers being burned off and the
roofs caved in, leaving the lower rooms
entirely protected. Old ditches and
roads are to be seen in every direotion
The Navajo Indians say, in regard to
these ruins, that their forefathers oame
there five old men's ages ago (500 years),
and that these ruins were there, and tb
Bame then as now, and there is no record
whatever of their origin.
A LEOOD OP DONNKU LAKE.
Among the survivors of the Donner
party was a girl twelve years of age.
After facing the starvation and misery ot
that memorable winter when they were
snowed in at Donner Lake, tho few who
survived made their way over the mount
ains. Tbe'e were no roads, and great
and almost insuperable obstacles were
encountered by these starving immi
grants. At one place, a short distance
this side the summit, the wagons had to
be hoisted up a very Bteep plaoe, by ropes
attached to a large tamarack. They were
assisted at this juncture by a few Washoe
Indians, and among tbe band was a nne
lookiug fellow of about eighteen sum
mers, who was particularly attentive to
tbe party, and after scaling the mount-.
tains, offered bis services to accompany
tbem, oh he was acquainted with the
country. Nothing wrong was inferred
from the offer, but be was gladly accept
ed. He not only went with them over
the mountain road, but stayed in tbe
neighborhood where tho girl was reared
for years alterward. He never offered
any advances toward her, never offered
her an insulting word, and although it
was suspected that a strange attachment
had sprung up on his part toward tbe
girl, it was passed by unnotioed. When
the young woman married Noyab, the
Indian, returned to bis old borne in the
mountains, and the first place he sought
was bis old familiar hunting grounds by
the shore of the high mountain lake He
refused to mix or associate with his
old companions, although his parents
did all in their power to assuage bis
melancholy feelings; he became gloomy
and morose, and spent his nights and
days around the shores of tbe lake, often
sleeping on the very spot where the
family suffered the privations and agony
of that cheerless Winter. He soon bo
came an object of curiosity for the neigh
boring Indians, and his strange conduct
attraoted the attention of their "medi
cine man," who advised tho tribe that
the young brave was bewitched, or pos
sessed of tbe devil. This was a henious
offense with the tribe, and it decided his
fate. One morning he was found dead
among tho bushes, baving been mur
derer ed by some of bis own brethren.
He was burned with appropriate cere
monies as was the custom in those days.
the story, although possessing a sem
blance of romance, was told us last week
while out to the lake, by an intelligent
buck, who Bays it is vouched for among
tbe older members of the tribe. We bad
known of the fact that a yonng Indian
had guided the party, and report had in
formed us that bin name was "Trnonee,
after whom the river was named. Other
informants say Truckee was the one who
guided tbe Fremont party. Truokee
Republican.
BANKING HOUSES.
JOB FEINTING.
TERMS Of ADVERTISING.
Afwesnment niaun ,a
Delinquent Bales, per square... I
Postponement Delinquencies, per Hun....
Dissolution Notloen ID
m otic to creditors 10
Court Summcns, per square
Special Locals Fifty Cents per line, for first
uu ienvnisioresonsnDseqaant insertion.
JOB WORK.
Done at the Rxcoktj offle. In th Hut .tvtsi
known to the art; and must be paid for on ds.
livery, unless persons bavins: the work dona
uave stauamg accounts with the offloe. Bo a .
vtatlon from this rule.
THE STATE
BANK OF NEVADA
E I O C XI 33.
STAGE LINES.
Board of Directors!
JOHN P. KELLET President
J AS. FINLATSON Tloe President
0HA8. A. WIEDEBHOLD ....Secretary
0. F. PHILSON J. W. WRIGHT,
R. II. BOURSE HARRY I. THORNTON.
Attorneys i THOKNTON.KELI.EYt GABBER
-rvEPOBITS RECEIVED, EITHER ON OPEN
l7 account or to issue certincstes tnereior pay-
Die on demand. , ,
EXCHANGE DRAWN UPON
NEW YORK and SAN FRANCISCO,
And other principal cities cf the U, 8.
Also upon
LONDON, DUBLIN, PARIS, BERLIN
And all of the principal cities of Europe.
Currency Bought and Sold.
Collections Promptly Made.
Railroad and Mining Stocks Bought
aud Sold on eominUsion.
7" Money Loaned on Stocks. I
Correspondents i
LAIDLAW SCO., Agents of the Bank I N(fw Jort
LONDON and SAN FRANCISCO
BANK LIMITED and J. H.
LATHAM a CO., Stock
Brokers
JOB PRINTING!
EVERY OTHER DAY
STAGE LINES.
....TO....
23 TJ H. JES EC jBl .
f AUK . T . SJI3.00.
W. El. GRIFFIN,
33 rjucinn.
Wouldn't Swap Wivks. When Sir
Samuel Baker, tbe African traveler, wag
taking leave of Kamrasi, King of Cnyore,
that potentate asked him as a particular
favor to leave lady Baker behind. Ibis
cool request raised Sir Samuel's ire and
in high indignation he told the king that
if ever he made such a request again he
would shoot him. Lady Baker, too, who
overheard and understood the offer, felt
that a word from her would not be out
of place, and gavi the monarch a piece
of her mind iu tbe strongest language
Bhe could oommaud. His Majesty for a
while was greatly astonished, being un
conscious of having given any offense.
At last, seeing that bis guests were really
nDgry. be said, in a deprecating tone,
"Don't be angry, I did not mean to
offend you by asking for your wife. I
will give you a wife if yon want one, and
I thought you would have uo objections
to give me yours. It is my custom to
give my visitors pretty wives, and I
thongbt you would like to exchange.
Don't make a fuss about it; if you dou't
like to do as others do there's an end of
it."
A correspondent of tbe New York
Stockholder, writing from Gainesville
Georgia, Bays the following concerning
me existence oi gold, diamonds, and
other precious atones in that reoion
" Mr. Jeunings, of Brooklyn, New York,
has purchased tbeoelebrated Glade mine.
twelve miles from this city, which has
oeen worked tor forty yearB for gold,
sua nag yindea more tnau tbirtv sDlen
did diamonds. The present sale places
'Be property in Ihe bands of a gentle
man wbo not only bas will and determin
ntion of purpose to develop it, but ample
means to do go. This is all we ask, for
ine development will create a sensation,
nd a rush like California and Africa.
the diamonds are here, and all people
will soon believe it. I will further state
we are finding the precious corundum,
or ruby, one mile from this oity, and
supphires; and are preparing to wash on
a large scale noon, for tbe ruby and dia
monds. We have no doubt of a brilliant
ncoesg."
When they want to find out in th
country if a girl is courting or not, an
old lady stens in and remarks: "I m
there ain't no one sick in this here house
pr nothing, is there? 1 seen a light barn
in nigh on to twelve o'olock last night
""J.,1. don't smell no oamphire nor
nnlkl.l . ...
Tho month of Ramazan is kept by all
good mussulmans as a period of the
strictest fast during the day, from sun
rise to sunset; they abstain not only from
food of any kind whatever, bat even
from liquids, taking no drop of water
during tbe time; they suspend also the
enjoyment of tobacco, which u scarcely
less indispensable to their daily life. As
a compensation for these rigorous pri
vations, the night is partly devoted to
feasting. For the rich and idle, who
pass in sleep the greater part of their
davs of penitence, tbe suffering is con.
siderablv lessened; but for tbe poorer
classes, for workmen and servants, the
tetnezan, when it fails during tbe long
daysof tbe hot summer months, is cruel
ly severe; and it is to be remarked that
creciselv these hard workiDg and labor
ing "faiihful" are those wbo bold the
most strictly to their religious observ
ances. Aged people and children are not
required to keep the fast of Ramazan;
and women iu delioate health uro also
freed from tho obligation for the time,
but thev are expected fo make up tbe re.
quired number of penitentlul days before
its occurrence in the ensuing year; ana
the. ill advised visitor wbo may risk a
visit to u harem as that season is draw
ing near' is sure to find several of the
inmates undergoing their days of 'peh-
rip,', (abstinence), and consequently
pale, weary, and slightly out ot humor.
London Society,
Tun Gh'kobd BALLoos.-There is such
a demand for Bpaoe within the inclosnre
nf the Paris Exhibition of 1878 that the
Direotor-General is obliged to decline to
grant permissian to M. Gifford to con
struct bis monster balloon on Govern'
meut land. The construction will take
place on land lent for the purpose, at a
short distanoe irom tne uamp ue mars.
The preliminary teebnioal arrangements
. , i . . j .,- j rpi
have Deen maue oy ru. uiuoru, tus
leneth of the rope wbioh will be conioal,
will be COO metres (1,908 feet). The
asoonding force, when loaded with bal
lent. Buido-ropes. grapnels and fifty pas
sengers will be 5 ton. The weight of
the onble will be IV. tons when fully ex
pended. The asoending force of tbe
hydrogen filling the envelope will be 23
tons. The diameter of the balloon will
be 31 metres (1111, feet), and tbe height
50 metres(lGl feet) from the lower part
of the car to the upper part of the valve;
and the engine to draw down the baloon
will be 200 horse-power.
Ayoung Amerioan damsel, of thorough
ly unembarrassed manners, reoently
went to call on Gustavo Dore and fouud
bim at work upon a picture, whereupon
she was sood enoutfh not only to tell
him whBt to do next, but aotnally take
the brush out of bis band and add tbe
necessary touches herself. Tho gentle
man wbo accompanied ber was over
whelmed with oonfusion, but tbe good-
natured artist only laughed.
The Jackson Pilot says: Dr. David
Rosser fired two shots at Chisholm's
daughter and little son to force tbem to
let go the prison door, which they held
to prevent biB entranoe. He wag soon
after shot dead. Old man Rosser came
tbe following day to get bis remains
On dragging down the sheet which
covered the body, aud Beeing the upper
portion of tbe face shot away, the gentle
parent remarked, "Humph! Must have
fired both barrels into him. That's
what he gets for coming here. I told
bim to stay at borne."
Another. Homicidk. A correspondent
writing under date of the 7th instant
gives the following particulars of
tragedy which occurred at Halleck sta
tion in this county on that day:
About 12:30o clock this afternoon
colored man named Mills drew a knife
on Mrs. Deering and a man named
Webb. Webb struck tbe negro in the
moutb, and with tbe assistance of Mr.
Deering took the knife from him. Deer
iog then paid the negro what be was
owing bim, and ordered bim to leave the
house aud not return. J. be negro wen
to F. E. Hughes' bouse and attemped to
obtain possession of a shot gun, but was
prevented by James l' lUerty. The negro
left Hughes and went to Griffin i
saloon. Webb and Fiuerty soon follow-
ed bim there. Webb struck the negro
two or three times, Griffin and Finerty
doing all tbey oould to prevent the strik
ing, and Finerty finally suooeeded in
getting Webb to stop. Tbe negro re
turned to Hughes', and obtained tha
shot gun. He tben returned to Griffin's,
and as Finerty opened the front door to
come out of the saloon shot him dead
Tbe negro gtarted to run toward tha
river, but when Griffin came out of tbe
baok door of the bouse shot toe second
time. As tbe negro was on bis way to
Griffin's. A. J. Hatch told htm to stop
but he replied. "You attend to your own
business, or I will give you a uobo
Sheriff Seitz and a party are after tb
negro, and should ha be caught will
probably fare pretty rougb, as young
Fiuerty was highly esteemed by all who
kuew bim, and if any ot tne citizens,
other than Mr. Seitz, should capture
hiui bis execution would not ocst tbe
county anything. Tusoarora Raview,
...
Hauk Munk is still Chief Eugineer
a Lake Taboo stsge.
HALP-DalLT V&UM
HAMILTON TO
SCHELL
ROBINNON
CREEK,
AMI
Sas Francisco
Jal-tl.
1. W. WRIQHT. Bank Manager.
PIOCHE RECORD
NEWSPJAPER
-AND-
JOB .PRINTING
OJb'Jb'IOE,
AMD iOIII,
WELLS, FARGO & CO.,
PIOCHE, NEV.,
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUS
INESS. Deposits received on Open Ao-I
count or Certincstes issuea therefor.
Exchange drawn on all tho principal cities of I
the united states, Canada snu Europe.
Will purchase Silver and Crude Bullion or I
make advances on same and ship for owner's
sccount.
COBBESPOITOEBTS! "
WELLS, FARGO dc CO., J
San Francisco, CaL
WELLS, FARGO & CO., ;
45 Broadway, New Tork.
EIVES, & ALLEN,
61 King William street, London, Eng.,
Agents Wells, Fargo a Oo.
AND TBI-WKXXLT FROM
HAMILTON TO OHESET CHEEK
EVERT OTHER DAT FROM
PIOCHE TO SALT LAKE CUT.
VIA LEEDS.
FARE TO TERMINUS, 140.
GILMEE & SALISBURY, Proprietors.
CARBTUK TJ. g. HAIL AND WELLM, FAR
GO OO.'B EXPRESS.
Tho Thm Lines mowly Blocked with
Vlnm AMERICAN HORSE amJ
new CONCORD COACHKM.
ataoes leave Piocne at 8 o'clock A. SI.. ,
makiUK doss connection with Railroad, tltags
from Hamilton.
Ofl!o at Well. Faro; dt C. '.
nal-tf
MAIN STREET,
Pioohe, KToxr.
EUREKA
AND.
OFFICE In Wells, Fargo
Main street, Floche, Nevada.
Co's Building,
mr-.HJ.tI
V11EDERD0LD & GOODllili
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN;
STATIONERY,
SCHOOL BOOKS,
T "W "ST S TOVMKS
PERIODICALS ND
NEWSPAPERS
or Ul KXHDS.
Imported and Domestic
CIGARS,
TOBACCOS,
PIPES, CUTLERY, ETO.
AOENTS FOB
Eureka Daily Sentinel,
The attention cf Merchants and Mining Com
panies of Southern Nevada and South.
western Utah is called to tha fact that
Job Printing of every discretion Is
done at the Rxooao Office In
elegant style and at the
LOWEST PRICES.
Business Cards,
Wedding Cards,
Letter-Heads,
Bill-Heads,
Ore Receipts,
Assay Blanks.
Programmes,
PALISADE
RAIL ROAD.
NOTICE TO SHIPPERS.
GREAT REDUCTION
IN-
RATES OF FREIGHT!
SHORTKST AND QUICK KMT ROUT
TO PIOCHE.
VIA EUREKA AND PALISADE R. H.
AND FAST FREIGHT TEAMS.
Rates payable In United States gold
ooln or Its equivalent.
All Consiirnments of Goods Forwsrdad with
Promptness and Dispatch. No Forwarding
or Commission Charfres.
Mark Goods Car "E. k P. R. R."
All Liquors and Liquids will be transported
only at the owner's risk of leakage.
On and after May 1st and until No
vember lst.18Te, Bates on all Fint-Class
Freight from Palisade to Plocha will be Three
(3) Cents per Pound, Including transfer st Pal
isade sod Eureka.
W. V. GHIFflN,
al3-tf Agent.
P. H. TOD'S SHOOS,
Corner Main and Meadow Valley ate.
Handbills,
Posters, etc..
A ND ALL KIND OF FANCY AND PLAIN
i. Job Printing done In flrst-olaes style snd
at snort notice,.
CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA I
Dallies delivered oy Carrier to an J part I
oi Town
A ND ALL
MAIN STREET,
OH
OPPOSITE MEAD.
Bp
VALLEY PIOCHE, NEV.
fl-tf
ALPS MILL.
PE0FESSI0NAL OAKDS.
GEO. T. GORMAN,
NOTARY PUBLIC for LINCOLN
COUNTY.
COMMISSIONER OF DEEDS FOR
CALIFORNIA AMD UTAH,
Ueoonl OBios Lacour Strool
Jcl PlOOHi.KEV.
GIVEiUS A CALL.
Satisfaction guaranteed In all. cases.
RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY.
CUSTOM ORES
RECEIVED AND
WORKED ON
SHORT NOTICE.
A. J. BLAIB,
dtO-tf BnpsrlBttadsBt.
BB3T "WINES,
L1ZQTJOB.S, X3to.
T'HIS IB DESERVEDLY A PLACE OF GEN
ERAL reeort by all who Indulge ls
Social Glass. Olva him a call.
IsS-tf
NOTICE.
T AKE NOTICE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED
own two-thirds Interest (undivided) in
thst oertsin ilver mine in Bristol Mining Dis
trict, Lincoln oounty, Nevsda. known under Us
original and only true location nams as th
"Bully Boy Mine," Bill now claimed to Be
named, under a pretended second location, as
tbe " Great Eastern Mine;" that any purchase
or sale of said mine made withont the oonssnt
or authority of the uudersignsd will be invalid,
ana an persons are herooy cautioned mat on
H. G. Steele and one Abe Rlosrds, who Illegally
claim the exclusive title to said mine, have no
right to dispose of the same.
B. r. HIVES,
J. R. DUFF,
mjrS-0d JOHN O' DOUGHERTY
NOTICE.
IX) PATRICK I AVAHAGH. AND TO WHOM
it may oont-era. tou are hereby notiied
that yon are indebted to tho undersigned
in tha sum of $460, geld coin, for Honey
expended by me In working the " Home Bale
mine," situated In Ely Mining Dlstriot, Lincoln
county, Stste of Nevada. Unless yon pay mo,
at my residence In Pioohe, Nevada, the above
proportional snare or said expenditure on sua
mine within ninety d.ys from data, tvgstber
with costs, your Interest la said Bias will be
forfeited to bus by duo moosse of law.
fHOMAS J. McsUBON.
Flocks, Nevada, Marsh 33, 1ITT.
ft II
A
1 1
1 1
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