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Lincoln County record. [volume] (Pioche, Nev.) 1900-1905, March 10, 1905, Image 3

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Many Persons Have Catarrh of Kidneys,
Or. Catarrh of Bladder and Don't Know It. I
President Newhof and War
Correspondent Richards We re
Promptly Cured By Pe-ru-na.
Mr. 0. B. Newhof, 10 Delatnare street,
Albany, K. Y., President Montefiore
Club, writes: :
"Since my advanced age I find that
I bare been frequently troubled with
urinary ailments. The bladder seemed
Irritated, and my physician said that It
was catarrh caused by a protracted
cold which would be difficult to over
come on account of my advanced years.
I took Peruna, hardly daring to believe
that I would be helped, but found to
my relief that I soon began to mend.
The Irritation gradually subsided and
. the urinary difficulties Damned avmv. 1
I have enjoyed excellent health now for
the past seven months. I enjoy my
meals, sleep soundly, and am as well
as I was twenty years ago. I give all
praise to Peruna. "-C. B. Newhof.
Suffered From Catarrh of Kidneys,
Threatened With Nervous Collapse,
Cured by Pe-ru-na.
ilr. F. R. Richards, 609 E. Street, N,
W., 'Washington, I). C, War Corres
pondent, writes: "Exactly six years ago
I was ordered to Culia as Htaflf corres
pondent of the New York Kun. Iwam
charge of a Sun DispaU'h boat through
the 8panlh American war. The effect
of the tropical eliniate and the nervous
strain showed plainly on my return to
the states. Lassitude, depression to the
verge of melancholia, and incessant
kidney trouble made me practically an
Invalid, This undesirable condition
oontinued, despite the best of treatment.
Finally a brother newspaperman.who
like myself had served in the war, in
duced me to jfive a faithful trial to
Peruna. I did so. In a short time the
lassitude left me, my kidneys resumed
a healthy condition, and & complete
cure was effected. I cannot too strong
ly reoommed Peruna to those suffering
with kidney trouble. To-day I am able
to work as hard as at any time in my
life, and the examiner for a leading in
surance company pronounced me an
"A" risk."
In Poor Health Over Four Years.
Pe-ru-na Only Remedy of Real Benefit.
Mr. John Nimmo, 215 Lippincott, St.,
Toronto, Can., a prominent merchantof
that city and also a member of the
Masonic order, writes:
"I have been in poor health generally
for over four years. When I caught a
bad cold last winder it settled in the
bladder and kidneys, causing serious
trouDie. l took two trreatlr advertised
:
PRES. C. B. NEWHOF,
Suffered From Catarrh of Bladder.
JOHN BURT?mdxS
Author of Th Kldn.pp4 Mllltorj.lr.t," 'Colon.l Monroe's Doctrln . Etc
rBSD.r.IJ1'"' !' . I " AUrlrtts I CoevaioHT. tw. bt
rBapa.iut Ufbam AOam rewrved A. J. PaaaL Uippts
desired results. Peruna is the only
remedy which was really of any benefit
to me. I have not had a trace of kidney
trouble nor a cold in my system."
Pe-ru-na Contains No Narcotics.
One reason why Peruna has found
permanent use in so many homes is that
t columns no narcotic of any kind.
i-erunais perlevtlv harmless. It ran l,
used any length of time without acquir
ing1 a drug habit. Peruna does tint. r.
uutu temporary results, it is perman'
ent in its effect.
Jt has no bad effect unon the Kt-utom
and gradually eliminates catarrh by
"'""""K usurb oi catarrn. There
area multitude of homes where Peruna
lias Decn usea ott and on for twenty
years. Such a tiling could not be pos-
,A .j: ...i.T...... " .lT I : . i"iui urugsoi
'uu; iciucuico wuuuui nj iui( tno i a narcotic nslure.
Say Plainly lo Your Grocer
That you want LION COFFEE always, and ho,
being a square man, will not try to sell you any- '
thing els a. You may not care for our opinion, but
What About foe United Judgment of Millions
of houBekeepers who have used LION COFFEE
for over a quarter of a century?
Is there any stronger proof of merit, than, the
Confidence of the People
and ever Increasing popularity ?
LION COFFEE Is carelully se
lected at tbe plantation, shipped
direct to our various factories,
where it Is skillfully roasted and
carefully packed In sealed pack
agesunlike loose coflee, which
Is exposed to germs, dust, In
sects, etc. LION COFFEEreaAb.es
i ou as pure and clean as when
It lelt the factory. Sold only In
1 lb. packages.
Lion-head on every package.
Save these Lion-heads for valuable premiums,
SOLD BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE
W00LS0N SPICE CO., Toledo, Ohio.
CHAPTER TWO Continued.
Prince growled. John looked up the
road.
"There's someone coming," he said.
Jessie turned and saw Miss Maiden
approaching. She looked at her mud
dy feet, her bcdrasglod hat and her
splattered blouse and Bkirt.
"I'll get an awful scolding," she
said, half to herself and half to the
boy. Then lor the first time she
scrutinized John Hurt. She noted
that he was will dressed; that he
was not barefooted", like most farmer
boys, and that he was handsome and
self-possessed.
"Do you belong to the riffraff?"
asked Jessie, lowering her voice so
that the approaching governess
should not hear her.
"Never heard of it," replied John
Burt In a puzzled smile. "What
is ltt"
"I don't know," said Jessie; "but
my papa don't allow me to associate
with the riffraff, and I forgot until
Just now to ask you if you are a riff
raff." A look of pain came to the honest
ace of the boy. Before he could
wpeak Jessie turned to meet Miss
Maiden.
"Why, Jessie Carden, what have
you been doing?" With a cry of dis
may the governess dropped an arm
ful of flowers and surveyed the wreck
of the sailor suit.
Jessie looked penitent Indeed as
she gazed at the muddy shoes and the
torn stocking; but contrition is a fee
ble flane in the heart of a child.
"Never mind the old clothes,
Govle," she said. "Watch me catch
a crab! I can do It just splendid!"
"Jessie, lay that pole down and
come away with me," said Miss Mai
den sternly. "How dare you play
with a strange boy! What would
your father say? Come with me at
mont of the farm. He did not know
how long bo would bo gone It might
De a year or it might be five. With
some tenderness he kissed the weep
ing orphans, and tramped down the
road in the direction of Hlngham.
Five years later the Segrecansett
dropped anchor at New Bedford. None
of the crew that went on with her re
turned, Peter Burt sold the cargo,
paid off his men, disposed of his in
terest in the ship, and on the follow
ing day walked Into the Burt farm
house. He was greeted affectionate
ly by his son Joseph, who for a year
had lived alone In the old house. A
week later the boy was Bent to school
In Boston, and Peter Burt began his
Bolitary occupancy of the ancestral
home.
Shortly before Peter Burt's return,
Robert had married, and the old man
was delighted when the young couple
made a visit to the old farm. The
foliuwlng year John Burt was born,
and Peter Burt Journeyed to Boston
to witness the christening.
Two years later Robert Burns Burt
and his wifo were Instantly killed in
a railroad accident. The train crashed
through a bridge, it was winter, and
bitterly col. Of the fifteen passen
gers In the car occupied by Robert
Burt, but one escaped. A child, two
years old, was found warmly wrapped
in Its traveling blanket, uninjured, on
a cake of ice, a few minutes after the
car plunged beneath the water. It
was John Burt.
In the opinion of his neighbors,
Peter Burt was crazy from the hour
the news came to him. Strange
stories were whispered concerning
Captain Burt, as he was then called.
Belated travelers along the lonely
road saw lights burning through all
hours of the night. They heard the
old man talking or praying in a ioud
voice.
x i i
"ThUk you're smart, dont ye?" re
sponded the strange boy as be baited
his hook. "Crazy Burt's boy, ain't
ye? No objection to my flshln', have
you?"
There was a taunting sarcasm In
his voice, and defiance in his air,
Without waiting for reply he cast
his line Into the water.
"You can fish as long as you please
on your own side of the creek," said
John sullenly. For half an hour no
word was spoken. John caught four
bass during that time, while Jim
hooked only eel grass. Then he cast
his line across the pool, dropping it a
few feet from John s line.
John Burt's face flushed angrily,
"Keep on your own side!" be com
manded.
"I'll fish where I darn please! This
isn't your creek!" retorted Jim Blake
with a defiant grin. "If it Is, what
are you going to do about It?"
As he spoke John brought his hook
near the surface, and by a sudden
twist "snagged" Jim Blake's line.
With a Jerk he whipped the rod from
his opponent's band. Young Blake
was furious. John calmly towed the
rod across the pool, unsnarled the
lines, and threw the rod on the bank.
Obeying a boy's flrs Instinct, Jim
looked for a stone, but found none.
Then he Jumped for the log. Drop
ping his rod, John Burt also sprang
forward, and they met in the center
of the bridge.
(To be continued.)
Why the 8es Is Salt.
Why should the sea be salt, when
Uie lakes and rivers are fresh? This
Is a question that comparatively few
people stop to think about. They rec
ognize the fact, but do not take the
trouble to reason about it.
There are four salts in sea water-
sodium chlorldo (common salt), mag
nesium, potassium and calcium. These
are minerals and are washed out of
the rocks of the earth by the Btreams
and carried to the sea in a state of
solution.
The water of the sea is being con
stantly evaporated, and it comes to
the land as rain, snow, hall or sleet.
But this evaporation leaves the Bait
in the sea, and as the streams are all
the time carrying more salt there the
quantity is constantly Increasing, but
so gradually that it Is not noticed In
the water.
It has been estimated that If all the
salt were obtained out of the waters
of the sea there would be enough to
cover the continent of North America
to a depth of half a mile.
In some parts of the world the salt
used by the people Is all obtained
from sea water, but not whore there
are salt mines or salt springs, for the
quality of that obtained from them Is
much superior to that yielded by sea
water.
onoe!" She gathered up the flowers
and took Jessie by tbe hand.
"Good-bye, Prince! Good-bye. John
Burt!" Jessie waved her hand gaily
at her fishing companion as Miss Mai
den turned into tho path leading
through the woods.
"He was real nice, and you're aw
ful good, Govle, not to scold him!"
were the words that reached John
Burt as he carried his basket of crabs
to the wagon.
CHAPTER THREE.
WE....
TREAT and CURE
CATARRH and til cwabl diaaaaea
of th, ay, r. noia. Ihroat, lunfa, atom
acK. Ilvar. bowala. kidnrya. bladdar tnd
all chronic. itaTvoiiaand pnvata diaoaaaa
ol balh aaxta. and diastaaa of children.
Hom Treatment Cum, Wrlta
for free ajiuptom Hat If yoo o. li
mit rail. Conaultatlon tree.
sa. a. t. Bonis.
Special Offer in Private Diseases
dr. a. w. burii
tTnfortDti. of both min, who r suffering from PrtTfttc dihimi.
8HUBIC81 DO NOT iSK YOU TO Par Tiit7l?,.l'.."'"ll! trwitraent. MIS.
TON WISH TO VOIJRSKl.r tKTll- CL KKD-USLKS
11KB BHOKK31
Bit
(IKS PERMANENTLY, aucl to FKOVM their aklll In ihl. eSlIiT ,, 8KAS?8
re .oh o.,.. before the patient la required w p., Lr2 Shorea ?"m.'"X lLil
IN BOTH
reat and
ho prafer,
ni.y par mo lea id mnall wt?ek r or mnnl h t lna i in.,.,. . 1,1 -
PLAN OF DKALINI4 WITH TIIK A PVI iptl'h rfi,r . JT - . t. Pr,Kre8e,. Tills HON EST
pennr to a duped patient? Take no ohnev-,o,i can, oi taie !oS, nof,.. ir!,'".'"r,.re"1?."' ?
Nine-tenth, of ao called ' W( AK.NBSSK8 OK ft IKN " are .ta V "'""'t 'o
ADH? vK"l" iI'A,?',-,"- WCaL TRMtK Jt' ' or?"". 'cS nTaRI-'
Sir iSSSS
nirific unr-i i. r " 'S,"" r" "' or at the omre.
... I" """" " w ' 10 ; annnayi an 1 boild-iya 10 a m lo U.
DBS. SHORES & SHORES, Expert Specialists. 249 TA
SEEDS
Good Seedi py, when you buy Purity
Seeda . get ,h, best (f 0BtBoi. frM
VOGELER SEED CO.
ALT LAKB
01TV, UTAH
SEEDS
POULTRf SUPPLIES
'"Si ILLUSTRATED CATALOQUS
THE LEE PIONEER SEED CO.
OEWVtW. OCLOHAOO
RELIABLE ASSAYS
n I Gold and Silver 11.00
1'i."; ',-1 WlGold.Siiw. Copper.. 1.50
laoer Gold. Retorte and Rich orea Uounbt.
Ooden flssau Co. 'SisSK-
BEST BY TEST
"I have tried all kinds of waterproof
clothing and have never found anything
at any price to compare with your Fish
Brand for protection from all Icmdi of
weather."
(The nime tnd addrctl of the
writer of thii umolicited letter
may be hd upon application.) ' '
A. J. TOWER CO.
Boston. U. S A.
The Sign of the F,dl
or of WarranM Wrt Wenlhn Clothing
TOWER CANADIAN
CO , LIMITED
Toronto, Canada
; NEW PENSION LAWS JSS
APPlSo NATHAN RK'KFORU, 814 IT St
i Vtaablugton. 1. C.
w- N. U Salt Lake-No. SO. 1905
LiliUU laji.11?' a. rTH.fTi'fS'
. tyi'"l llHtliC aiL fCL.VC k-Bll ."V
' CaaH
P1
i. wai j
SEVEN LEADERS
Barred Plymouth nork. Black Mlnaroa. Rhode
Inland Keds. KniT OrtiltiKioos, Brown Leghorn,
While Leghorn. Wtif:p Wrnndnttea. Ail prlw
winner. Eks. 12 for l.i. Wrjuui. Get tbe bcit.
Alto Incubator and Prouder. Chick food.
VOGELER SEEO CO. IXlbZZ
It afflicted with
oraayea uae
Thompson's Eye Water
When Answering Advertisement1
Kindly Mention This Paper,
John Burt'i Boyhood.
For two hundred years the Burt
house had withstood the blasts of
winter and the withering heat of sum
mer. Time had workod upon the
rough exterior until It seemed like a
huge rectangular rock, weather-worn
and storm beaten. The small ulateau
on which it stood sloped northward
to the sea. Rugged rocks to the west
stood as a wall, frowning at the quiet
beauties of salt marsh and cedar
swamp below. To the south were
patches of meadow wrested from
wood and rock by generations of toil.
Through this fairer section a brook
wandered between banks festooned
with watercress. Old settlers knew
the locality by the name of Rocky
Woods.
When Hezeklah Burt died, Peter
Burt inherited the hold homestead In
Rocky Woods. He was a young giant
with the shoulders of a Hercules. At
the age of thirty he took to wife the
fairest maiden of the surrounding
country, and to them a son was born
and christened Robert Burns Burt. A
year later the mother sickened and
died. The grief of Peter Burt was
terrible as his strength. For a year
be remained a prisoner in his house;
then returned to work, and for two
years labored with the energy cf a
demon. His second marriage followed.
He led to the altar the daughter of a
poor farmer, aud of this prosaic union
seven children were born.
ter. fifteen years of work and sor
row the patient wife folded her tired
hands, closed her weary eyes and
sank into that sleep which awakens
not to toil. If Teter Burt loved his
second wife, he never told her so. If
he loved her children, his expression
of affection took a peculiar form. He
mcde no secret of his favoritism for
Robert Burns Burt, the only child of
his first wife.
Robert was. a boy of whom any
father would be proud. At twelve he
wag sent to school in Hingham. At
nineteen he entered Harvard, gradu
ating In four years with honors. Af
ter two more years devoted to a law
course, he began practice In Boston,
and his success was Instantaneous.
For ten years after the death of his
wife, Peter Burt conducted the farm
of his forefathers. One after another
of his sons and daughters, as they
became of age, left the old home,
never to return. One night after sup
per Peter Burt Informed the remain
ing children that tie was going to sea.
He had bought an Interest In a whal
ing vessel, and wotdd sail from New
Bedford in a week. To Sarah tho
eldest of the children he gave three
hundred dollars, together with In
structions concerning the' manage-
Upon the death of Robert, Peter
Burt went to Boston and buried his
dead. With tearless eyes he saw tbe
pride of his old age lowered Into the
grave. Robert Burns Burt was a care
ful lawyer, and his will covered ever,y
contingency. It appointed his father
executor of his small estate, and In
trusted him with the care of his son.
Peter Burt placed the boy in the keep
ing of a competent nurse, and re
turned to his farm.
Save for the occasional smoke from
the chimney, there was no sign that
Peter Burt existed throughout t the
three months that followed. His son
Joseph called at the house, but was
not admitted.
At the end of this period the old
man emerged and was seen In Hing
ham. For the first time in years he
spoke to his neighbors, who noticed
that his hair was as driven snow,
ana mat nis lace shone with a
strange light. In the calm manner
of one controlled by an unalterable
conviction, he stated that he had
made his peace with God, and was in
spired by Hira. He had received the
gift of prophecy and of understand'
ing.
. wnen John Hurt was seven years
old his grandfather brought him to
the old farmhouse. With the boy
came his nurse and her husband,
William Jasper, the latter charged
with the duties of hired man. Thus
John Burt began hlB life on the farm,
When John had mastered bis let
ters and primer he was sent to school
In Hlngham, taking the regular course
for five years. Then a private tutor
came from Boston. Five days in the
week the boy studied under this
young man's direction, and made rap
id progress. With his stern old face
lighted with Joy and pride, Peter Burt
would listen to tho recitations.
CHAPTER FOUR.
Spool Building.
There Is nothing more Interesting
for an Ingenious boy or girl. Given
lot of spools and a ball of florists' wire,
so much can be done that It Is Impos
sible to give a detailed description. To
collect spools Is a much easier Job
than the old-fashioned practice of col
lecting buttons. Old buttons are
sometimes valuable In piecing out a
set, but empty spoolB are usually
thrown away. A person of enterprise
can always collect them, and the
umallest and most insignificant Is not
to be despised. A coming architect
can plan a house, and the builder of
a suspension bridge can siring his
spools securely on wire and produce a
complete and' steady structure. Strong
little taborets may be made of them,
if there is solid wood for the table
part; the spools may be used for the
legs and supports. A trash basket
may be made of them, strung one on
top of the other, with a wooden bot
tom, and lined wijth gay cretonne. The
smaller spools make pretty picture
frames, especially If painted white or
green. They may be used In a hun
dred ornamental ways, they may be
collected from a dozen different
sources, and they are sure to provide
amusement for innumerable rainv
days.
Woman 's Kidney Troubles
Lydla E. Plnriham's Vegetable Compound Is Espe
cially Successful in Curing This Fatal
Disease.
Zgly and 'aAe
Of all the diseases known, with
which womeu are afflicted, kidney dis
ease is the most fatal. In fact, unless
early and correct treatment Is applied,
vie weary patient leldom survives.
Being- fully aware of this. Mrs. Pink
ham. early in her career, gave exhaust
ive siuay to vne suhject, and in pro
ducing her great remedy Jor woman's
ills Lydia E. rinkham'a Vegetable
Compound was careful to see that it
contained the correct combination of
herbs which was sure to control that
fatal disease, woman's kidney troubles.
The Vegetable Compound acta In har
mony with the laws that govern the
entire female system, and while there
are many so called remedies for kidney
troubles, Lydia E. I'inkbam's Vege
table Compound is the only one ettpe-
ciauy preparea lor women, ana thou
sands have been cured of serious kidney
derangements by it. Derangements of
tne lemiuiue organs quickly affect the
kidneys, and when a woman has such
symptoms as pain or weight in the
loins, backache, bearing down pains,
urine too frequent, scanty or higU col
ored, producing scalding or burning,
or deposits like brick dust In it; un
usual thirst, swellingof hands and feet,
swelling under the eyes or sharp pains
in the back running down the Inside
of her groin, she may be sure her kid
neys are affected and should lose no
time in combating the disease with
Lydia K. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound, the woman's remedy for wo
man's ills.
The following letters show how
marvelously successful it Is,
Mrs, Samuel Frake, of Prospect
riains, N. J., writes:
Dear Mr. Pinkham:
I cannot thank vou anoue-h for what T.TrlU
K. Vinkliama Venerable lkmtuud headline
forma. When I flint wrote to you I had tuf-
ixreu tor ynara wun wnat uw doctor called
kidney trouble and roneeatlon of the womb.
My bark ai'hetl dreadfully all the time, and I
ulTnred ao with that hnaring-down feeling I
could hardly walk acrom the room. I did not
get any DftWr, ao decided to stop doctoring
with my physician and take Lydia B. Pink
haru'a V egf'tabU l.'tmKHuid and I am thank
ful to aay It baa entirely cured me. I do all
inv own work, have no more backache and
all the bad yniptonu have disappeared.
I cannot p'raiua your medicine nough, and
would ad viae all women tulTarlng with kldne
trouble to try it
Mrs. J. W. Lang, of 828 Third Are
nue, New York, writes:
Dear Mra. Pinkham
I have lieon a great aufTerer with kidney
trouble. My back ached all the time and
was diaroumged. I heard that Lydia K.
Pitikhain'a Vegetable Compound would enra
kidney diaeaae, and I began to take It: and It
haa cured me when everything else had failed,
1 have recommended it to lout of neonls and
they all praiae it very highly.
Mm. Plnkhtiin's Standing; In
Tit at ion.
Women Buffering from kidney
trouble, or any form of female weak
ness are Invited to promptly communi
cate with Mrs Pinkham, at Lynn,
Mass. tint or tne great volume of ex
perience which hIio has to draw from,
It is more than likely she has the very
knowledge that will help your ease.
Her advice is free and always help
ful.
Ivdla L Pinkham's Voidable Compound i a Woman' Kemcdy for Womfii'i Ilia,
FOR
MEN.
A Luxurious Bed.
An Indian potentate recently order
ed from Paris a bed which will rival
the rajah's hed in the Arabian Nights.
It Is of satinwood, richly carved, and
ornamented wlth'silver plates In re
pousse work, adorned with bouquets
of roses, pink and corn, the rajah's
coat of arms being placed at the head.
At each corner stands a statue of a
girl one French, one Greek, one Span
ish and one Italian. Each Is tinted ac
cording to the complexion of her race,
and wears a suitable hued wig, either
black, blond, chestnut or auburn.
These maidens have movable eyes,
and their only ornament Is a gold
bracelet round one arm, which waves
over the sleeper s head either a fan
or a yak's tail fly flapper. The fur
ther enjoyment Is heightened by en
Ingenious arrangement In the mat
tress, which, as soon as any one lies
down, plays a selection of Gounod's
airs. Ohio State Journal.
W. L. DOUGLAS
S 3 M & S3.22 SHOES
wiirUI ltfruiir Hi fir r -. IkhI ( vtf, tav Mtllitrg him. aut.t.
rinr wriarlny n-mlii i-. I'hfy ur Ju.t U(J thus I hut
r from tt..tH to?.0. The only llllrr urn la th ui-iff.
We I. UielM Wit. AO htM mur t m.akr. holtl httr
hiiM- he 1 1 -r. fir loner r, nrtil r ol'gr:. 1 n r iil- Hutu tiny
an hrr .O ahoc oil Ihf murkrl tti1u v. W.I,.. Ikoimlita guitr.
inifa) thfir vhIii ly ifuilti hta nnmit ianl prt- on the
hiMtdin ot itth a It of. Iook lor it. Tiekf no tmUadlutf . W. I,,
JkoHahta JM.AO hoa ui-f aolti iltrounh hi own ntiail alorta In
Ihr -tort pul rltlra, 11 ml b v allots Vulfra r vr m hern. Kumitt
(er whertt toti liv, W.l.luugluaahoeBitr within yuiirreaaiii.
filSTTBR THAy OTHER AT AST PR ft. 'I,
"roethelait tHrtr-veftr !ktiv(tm W.Lfimg'mtS.VUho? mi fiutnJ if not
n'l ai0i. hni br-tttr th ttu fw hv1. wirHt
Ihas, L. tanell, Aut. l'uW The ap,tat ,teHt Hunk, lit hatuip .h$. In.
Bovt wear W. L. Donrlu $2.50 ani $2.00 shou bev9 thy fit
batter, bold their ihape, and wear lonifer than other makoi.
W.L.DOUGLAS $4.00 SHCES CANNOT BE EQUALLED ATANV PRICE.
L t)oti(ifa ut't Vonma I.Wtihm in ht iWa.
Cult it cvnauirml to be the. fin at paifnt leather proitucrt.
f 4 st i ' i ,o ic i: v i; r kt w i i, ot w e a r ii it v
W, L. remittal has th Utiteat ho mitt onW hnmitcM In tti wnrl((,
Vo troittilw to Pt (it !y mail. y xirft pimyi drliveiy. If you rtetun
further fnfurnnttion, write jot JlluMtratnl t'atitiooue of Hprina Mutes.
I W.L.DOUCLAS, BROCKTON, MASSACHUSETTS
1 VaA' i
MMkliWakilsah
HALL'S CANKER AND DIPHTHERIA REMEDY
Oft TH MOUTH. TH'.OaT.
TOMAOH AND SOWaL.,..
ro sals ev all onuaaieTa
AND aaNSHAL STORSS
NEVER FAILS
NBlden-Judson Drug Co., General Agents. Salt Lake City, Utah.
Regulate Prices of Medicine.
In Prussia the price of medicine U
regulated by the state, a new price
list being published every year.
TEA
Tea thoughts are like dream
thoughts, not tied to , our
cares and sorrows.
Gives Credit to Wife.
Prince Mlrsky, Russia's reform
statesman, attributes much of his suc
cess in public life to hid brilliant wife.
TEA
You can have good tea if
you want it, wherever you
are.
Tour grocer return, rour raotier If you doat
like Hoiiimug lied.
Bettsr Overalls can't
be made than the
"MOUNTAINRER"
. brand, made by Z. C.
M. I. and for aula by
all reliable atorea.
James Blake.
John Burt was fourteen year eld
when he first met James Blake. The
elder Blake had purchased the. old
Leonard farm, and so had become the
nearest neighbor of Peter Burt. There
were several children In the Blake
family, but this narrative has concern
only with James, the eldest, a boy of
Jonn Burt s age.
The two farms were separated by a
creek, which, at a place called the
Willows, widened to a pool, famed as
a Ashing and swimming place. One
June morning John was seated on a
log spanning the narrow neck of this
reacn oi water, ne naa landed a
bass, when the cracking of twigs and
the swaying of the underbrush on the
farther side of the creok attracted his
attention.
A moment later a boy emereed
from tho thicket. He surveyed John
with an expression more of contempt
than of surprise. The new comer was
a tall, well-formed lad, straight as an
arrow, quick and graceful in his
movements. He also carried a rod,
which he rested against the log; and
for a few seconds he calmly gazed at
"can Burt.
"Hello!"
"Hello!" answered John Burt.
"Flshln'?"
"No; swimming," replied John.
Steepest of Mountains.
Mount McKlnley Is known to be
the steepest of all the great motifr
tains of the world, and It Is unlike
most other great peaks from the fact
that arctic conditions begin at Its
very base. The prospective conquer
er of this Immense uplift must pick
his path over broken stones, Icy
slopes, sharp cliffs and an average
slope of 45 degrees for at least 14,
000 feet
Dogs That Smoke Pipes.
These two Aoga, Dewey and Ruth,
are tbe pets of a Minneapolis man.
Their skill at balancing pipes between
their teeth is but one of the many
clever tricks they have learned. In
Justice It should be said that the pipes
are never lighted, but the dogs enjoy
them, all the same, and anybody who
tries to Interfere with the after-dinner
smoke must watch for a fight
For Bible-Students.
If the children slain In Herod's
Slaughter of the Innocents were
burled In sand and but the right arm
showing, how could you tell the girls
from the boys?
This has puzzled many theoloelans.
but the answer is slTle: Only bovs
were slaughtered. Woman's Home
Companion.
Turquoise a Lucky Stone.
Tbe Orientals have a proverb, "That
a turquoise given by a loving hand
carries with it happlnefB and good for
tune"; and another, "That the tur
quoise pales when the well-beln? of
the giver Is In danger." Who, then,
would not be the possessor of a lucky
turquoise?
TEA
This is a better country
because we are in it tea
country.
And that isn't all.
Wrlta for eur Enow ledge Book, A.Bohllllnf &
Company, Ban Francisco.
A Foregone Conclusion.
When a husband and wife an both
of one mind it Isn't a difficult task to
figure out which originally owned the
mind. Philadelphia Inquirer.
TEA
The indulgence in tea is
so very slight, that the pleas
tire escapes attention, unless
one waits a bit.
Wrile for our Knowledse Book, t . Schllllm a
Company. San Franclaco.
Covetous bngineers.
The civil engineer often wishes with
a sigh that be were really monarch of
all that bo surveys. gomervllla Jour
nal.
VERY FEW, FF ANY,
CIGARS SOLD AT 6
CENTS. CO 'ST AS
MUCH TO MANUFACT
URE. OR COST THE
DEALER AS MUCH AS
IF THE DEALER TRIES TO
SELL YOU SOME OTHER
ASK YOURSELF WHY?
Salzer's
National Oafs
CmttMt oat of the oentoTT.
Tie idol In Otiio M, in Mich.
TM. In Mi 2;5. and lii N. .Dakota
8J' i m. per acre.
X u i oau Dyia uiac raooro in iun.
For 10c and this notice
i w matt jroo im lota of farm wd
ample ana our rautioR, iii l
ing k atxMit una oai wonor two a
tuouatDOa or oilier aeeua,
JOHN A. 8'tLZER SEE0C
WANTED
Four fUleaniPD In th and mfji'liilnff torrttary. to
ntDraseiit and advrtlne tlie Wbt'ienale Depart in ent
of an nld ftHtftf.i tit tied commercial bou of aolld
financial it and in it. HiapltUne. Salary as.!K per day,
ald weekly, with exinwi advanced direct from
eadquartert, llr and bnugy fiirntebed wbaa
Dtcaiary. We fiirn!h evt-rvtblutf. Potitloo pariran
eiit. AMrft o. E. RLEW, 8eorUry. M
Monon Bufldlng, Chicago, III

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