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The Point Pleasant register. [volume] (Point Pleasant, W. Va.) 1909-1939, August 25, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092106/1909-08-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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TO CONSTRUCT
RIVER CRAFT
'?r-r
KANAWHA AND OHIO RIVER TRANSPOR
TATION CO. TO ENGAGE IN RIVER
TRANSPORTATION.
J
With a capital stock of Si,200,000 :
the Kanawha and Ohio River Trans
portation company was chartered
Saturday at the office of the Secre
tary of State Stuart F. Reed to en
gage in the construction and opera
tion of water craft for transportation
purposes on the Mississippi, Ohio
and Great Kanawha rivers. The
incorporators are Howard C. Dick
son, Thornton J. Thea.ll, C. J. S.
DeVere and C. L. Norton, of New
York and B. A. Wordemann, of
Hoboker, New Jersey.
THAW
IN HIS CELL AT MATTEWAN-NO SPE-!
OAL PRIVILEGES,
' Mattewan, August 18?Harry K.
Thaw ate supper tonight at the
Mattewan state hospital for the
criminal insane.
Beginning tomorrow he will re
same his monotonous routine. Su
perintendent Lamb of the hospital
issued the following statement to
night:
"There Will be no changes at all
regarding Thaw's incarceration here.
He is subjected to the same rulings
as before he left to go to White
Plains. He will have a special room
not because he is Harry K. Thaw,
but for the reason that this hospital
is built to accommodate five hundred
patients and we now have nearly
SOOt. We are very crowded and some ;
of the patients have small rooms, ;
which were built for attendants. j
Thaw has one.
"I did not take it from Justice I
Mills* decision that Thaw was to j
have any special privileges. We:
will follow the Court's orders, how- :
ever, and if Thaw is not satisfied he j
can appeal to the courts. At pres- j
ent we adhere to the old routine." |
OHIO RIVER WATER.
11 has been suggested that inas- i
much as the river water is killing the i
fish it is dangerous to drink it. Ohio
river water is a pretty tough propo- 1
sition at any stage of the game, but'
there is something radically wrong
somewhere when it is possible for'
arid to work such destruction even '
by accident.?Wheeling News.
Our brother on the Ohio has a
right to kick possibly, but what
almut those who live on the once
beautiful Kanawha. Don't you fel
lows who are now out of your teens
remember when you could sit on the'
roof of your favorite packet and sec
the rocks and the fishes at a depth
of ten feet beneath the beautiful
blue? We'll never again experience
those sights, ^although the legisla
ture appointed a splendid committee
to look after the Kanawha's polution,
at the last session. Surely there is
something wrong.?Winfield Demo
crat.
SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT.
Senator Scott has gained a repu
tation for discretion in a way as
unique as it is ingenuous. He was
proceeding with great stand pat
unction the other day to read a long
protection speech when oenator Gore
asked a question. T^e West Vir
ginia Senator quickly replied: "I am
not very strong in running debate,
Mr. President, and I would prefer
not to be interrupted. Scott had
not forgotten that when he attempt
ed to keep pace with Bailey in run
ning debate and had stated his view
on a certain question, the Texas Sen
ator confounded him into speechless
ness by the declaration: "The Sen
ator thinks he thinks that, but when
he thinks, he will think he doesn't
think anything of the kind."
A NICE PLUM
FOR A. G. STAGG
X
DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF WORKSHOPS
AND FACTORIES.
Another plain has been landed by >
a Democrat, and this time the lucky
recipient is a Meigs county Demo-;
(Hat.
A. G. Stags, Central Committee
man for the Second ward received
notice Saturday of his appointment
as Deputy Inspector of Workshops
and Factories under Chief Inspector
Kearns, and went up to Columbus
Monday to qualify for the position
and receive instructions in the duties
of the position.
The position is a nice one, paring1
?1200 a year and expenses, and is !
therefore the best appointment that1
ever came to a Meigs county Demo
crat, since Governor Hoadley ap
pointed Judge F. C. Russell to fifl
out a common pleas judgeship 251
years ago.
Mr. Stagg, who is a splendid me-?
chanic, and has worked in shops all <
over the country, is well equipped
for the position, and his acquaint
ances are all confident that he will
make a splendid official. He is a
gentleman of education, refinement,
sterling honesty and has a pleasing j
personality which will make it a de
light to have him call upon you in
official capacity.
His appointment gives splendid
satisfaction to Meigs county Demo-:
crats, for the party never had a mem-1
ber, or one more deserving of polit- j
ical recognition. Republicans are :
also pleased with the selection, for
Mr. Stag? is popular in both parties. i
Ke succeeds Deputy Moore of
Ironton, and his district will embrace
a bunch of river counties.?Pomerov !
Democrat. I
Mr.-Stagg -for many years was a
a resident of this town, and everyone:
here is glad of his good fortune. He
was then, as now, a Democrat and
an earnest worker for the success of
his party. Shake, AL
HEROISM OF THE DEAD ENGINEER.
Atlanta, Ga., Aug. IS.?Passen
gers who were on the southern train,
wrecked near Bristol, Va., last even-1
ing, arrived here tonight, bringing j
details <>f the bravery of Engineerj
Samuel Bush, of Knoxville, Tenn.,:
who d:ed today as the result of his:
injuries.
Bush was slowly and painfully
working his way out of the wreck of
his engine, scalded and frightfully'
I ru'sed, when a few passengers who j
retained their senses, dug into the1
mass of twisted and burning iron to
meet him.
As the passengers began a hunt!
for whiskey to stimulate him, and
were breaking open suit cases in their
search, Bush asked for a last look at
his old engine as hojielcss a wreck as
its engineer. When they came to
him with liquor he begged them to
look after the comfort of the passen
gers.
He was told no passengers had
been injured and he said:
"That's good. But before I take
this whiskey I want you men to
smell my breath and testify, if need
be, that I had not been drinking
when'this happened."
Although suffering terribly the
brave engineer would not touch the
stimulant until four of Jie men had
smelled his breath and promised to
bear witness to his sobriety.
"All an engineer has is his record,"
he said, feebly, "and he cannot af
ford to have anything against that."
And Engineer Bush went out up
on his last run with his record spot
less.
Word has been received by the
police here to be on the lookout for
Joseph Jordan, age 16, of Scranton,
Pa., who mysteriously disappeared
from his home about a week ago.
The parents offer ?500 reward for the
knowledge of his whereabouts.
LICOLN CENT
WORTH NICKEL
CAN BE USED IN SLOT MACHINES AND
ALSO IN TELEPHONE PAY
STATIONS.
;
Lincolcn pennies, being about the
sixe mid constituency of the ordinary
nickel, it is said, are being used for
the five cent piecc on slot machines,
and in telephone booths, to the an
noyance of the owners of the ma
chines and the phone, lines. While
the coins are not exactly alike in any
especial material feature, the differ
ence in weight is so little that the
Lincoln penny will work the ordinary
game that calls for five times the
amount. The sizes, while also not
the same, are sufficiently similar to
permit of using the penny in five
cent machines. It is said that at
several places where there are toll
stations on the phone lines the pen
nies have turned up and that when
the new penny comes into general
circulation it will be necessary to re
arrange the mechanism.
UP AGAINST IT
EXPECTED TO STOP THE POLLUTION OF
SEVERAL STREAMS
The commission appointed by Gov.
Glasscock to investigate the causes
of the pollution of the Gauley and
New Rivers, composed of ex-Gov.
\V. A. McCorkle, Senator Adam B.
Littlepage and W. W. Wood is hiv
ing trouble.
They are expected to devise ways
and means for stopping the pollution.
They have investigated only the
Gauley river thus far, going as far as
Richwood, where they found a thriv
ing city -of- MOO inhabitaatft^-wbasc
sole existence depends on the plant
of the Cherry River Boom and Lum
ber Company and the West Virginia !
Pulp and Pa|>er Mill. Those plants I
make deposits of deleterious matter
into the river and if -they are com- i
pelled to suspend ojierations the
town of Richwood will be w iped out i
of existence. The commission is in
a quandarv.
"
STREET PAVING.
VIAND STREET ORDERED PAVED FROM
7TH TO 11TH STREETS.
At a meeting of the city council j
last night ordinancos were passed;
ordering the paving of Viand street,:
from 7th to 11 th street. The first;
class Spilman blocks were contracted i
for at $11.50 per M., delivered here. !
commencing on the 7th or 8th of'
September.
WILL PURIFY THE OHIO.
Governor ""homas R. Marshall,
of Indiana, has written to Governor j
Harmon, of Ohio, his desire to co- \
: operate in the plan for improved;
sanitarv regulations for the Ohio
: river.
Joint commissions of which Judge
E. E. Corn, of Ironton, is a mem
! ber have been provided by l'enns
'? wlvania, Kentucky, West Virginia
and Ohio. Indiana has taken no
action, probably because the previous
governor refuses to call the project
to the attention of the Hoosier leg
islature.
The commission of which Dr. C.
O. Probst, secretary of the Ohio
Board of Health, is secretary, has
held one meeting to outline the
work. Each state is working this
summer on a sanitarv- survey of the
stream. Many of them have been
emptying sewerage into it. The
waters to be made as palatable as
possible for domestic use. At the
next meeting of the joint commission
the Indiana governor will have rep
resentatives paid from his contingent
fund, a thing Ohio has never allowed
her executives for emergency use.
OLD MOUND
AT MOUNBSVULE
TO BE BEAUTIFIED AT LAST?ACTUAL
WORK HAS BEGUN.
In charge of Prison Guard Miller,
the florist of the penitentiary, a large
Rang of convicts were yesterday
morning placed to work in tearing
out all famous old pre-historic Indian
mound which was recently purchased
from the McFadden . heirs by the
state. Several old redwood trees
which have stood on the old mound
for over a hundred years, were re
moved.
Warden J. E. Mathews will have
charge in having the old mound
beautified. It is his idea to have all
the dead timber removed and the
grass planted on the banks. A pre
historic log cabin will be erectcd on
the top of the style that was built
in the Ohio valley when the first
white settlers came to this section, j
The ground at the foot of the
mound will be laid out in a beautiful
park, adorned with beds of flowers
and a fountain will probably be
placed in the center which will be
filled with gold fish. Drive ways
will be built to the mound and & path
will be built to the rustic cabin on
the top. A tunnel will be dug from
one end of the mound to the other
and it is expected that during the
excavation many old relics will be
found.
NOT GOING TOGO YET.
The Intelligencer says that Daw
son is "going to go to China. % e
want to know 1 Is he going to New
York to go, or is he going to San
Francisco to go to China.* Or is he
just simply going to go on to think
about going to go to China or going
tp ?o t;o stay at home. where he.has
a better chance of going to go for a
senatorial toga? Anyhow Dawson al
ways had the reputation of going
some.?St. Marys Oracle.
QGANTIC REPORT
OF AMERICAN FARMER SHOWN IN CROP
REPORT.
Washington, August IP.?It used
to be "Lo the jxxir farmer!" Now it's
"Oh the pluocratic agriculturist I"
"Billions upon billions the farmer
has again piled up his wealth," says
Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, in
his annual report, made public todaj .
In the crop-year of 1908 the total
valuation of farm products Mas S" ,
778,000,000, the biggest in the
world's history, as the secretary sug
gests.
While these figures contain some
duplication, Wilson explains, on the
other hand, they do not contain some
important items of wealth production,
and the fact remains that the un
thinkable amount of seven and three
fourths billions of dollars of wealth
have been produced by farmers this
year for national sustenance and for
export to the craving millions of
foreign nation.
"it is a real tangible wealth, as it
exists at the time it leaves the hands
of the producer. It is about four
I times the value of the products of
i the mines, including minerals, oils
: and precious metals.
"From these agricultural products
the manufacturing and mechanical
industries that use agricultural pro
ducts as materials draw 86 per cent
of their total materials, and these
industries use 42 per cent on all ma
terials used in the entire business
of manufacturing. These figures in
dicate the extent to which the manu
facturing industries are attributed to
agriculture, although no recognition
is given to this fact.
"The farm value of farm products
this year is $290,000,000 above the
value for 1907 and ?3,061,000,00
above the census amount for 1899.
During the last ten years the wealth
production of the farms of this coun
try has exceeded the fabulous amount
of $60,600,000,000.
! "Greatest of all crops is Indian
I com, the priceless gift of the nation..
FOR REUNION OF
BLUE AND GRAY
I - I
INTERESTING PROGRAM IS TO BE GIVEN
AT RAVENSWOOD, W. YJL,
COMMENCING TOfiAY.
Ravenswood is making big prepare
tions to entertain the reunion of the1
. Blue and Gray, Wednesday, Tburs- j
. day and Friday, August 25, S6 and !
27. There will be big crowds there
each day. Governor Glasscock will
be there to speak Thursday, the sec
ond day. ITierfc will be a base ball
game each afternoon, as follows:
Wednesday afternoon. 2 :SO Lauck
port A. C. vs. Ravenswood; Thurs
day afternoon. Reedy vs. Ravens
wood; Friday morning, 10:30, Spen
ber A. C. vs. Ravenswood; Friday
afternoon, 2 K)0 Spencer vs. Ravens
wood. The Reedy and Ravenswood
bands will play cach day of the re- j
union.
JOKE ON THE FARMER.
Fashion robs the fanner of a grqit
deal more than he knows. Accord
ing to a bird expert, he loses 838,
000,000 a year just became women
wear feathers, plums and stuffed
birds in their hats. Thus th<? farm
er, who usually goes very little on
style has to pay for fashionable rai
ment just the same, and the worst
of it Is somebody else is wearing it.
Birds destroy noxious insects and'
prevent the growth of weeds by eat-,
ing the seeds, but there arc still a
great many bad insects and many
miles of weeds. The inference is
that if the birds killed by milliners j
were left to help those who escape
there would not be nearly so many
of either.
So the joke is on the farmer both
ways.__ __
CHAMPION CONTRARY WOMAN.
Charleston?Charleston lays claim ,
to having the champion contrary;
woman. Sonic days ago Mrs. Mock
Overstreet whs fined for harboring a
vicious dog. The fine was not paid
at the time, and she was placed in .
jail. When a daughter, a few hours,
later, paid the fine and went to the j
jail to get her mother, the latter,
promptly and indignantly refused to (
leave the jail, declaring that she could i
be just as contrary as those who put!
her in jail. A day's incarceration did ^
not even lessen her idea of revenge j
and officers had to forcibly eject her |
from the cell and building.
ANDY SPEAR DEAD.
Andy Spear, a former well known
resident of this city, died at the
home of his sister in Cleveland last
week. In his younger days Andy
attained celebrity as a black face ar
tist with the small minstrel shows of
his day. Later on he and his wife
toured the smaller towns with a troup
of trained dogs. After his wife died :
he drifted around and apparently]
had a hard time to get along. He
was a whole-souled generous man and
true to his friends. The kst time
we saw him, he passed through here
enroute to the Jamestown exposi
tion and left us an album as a me
mento. Peace be to his ashes.?
Gallipolis Bulletin.
AS LISTED BY THE INTELLIGENCER.
Up to date the list of prospective
candidates for the Republican nom
ination for governor includes Wm.
F. Hite, of Cabell; Sherman Robin
son, of Bitchie; Charles W. Dillon,
of Fayette; Stuart F. Reed, of Har
rison ; John Sherman Darst, of Jack
son; Robt. "Hailett, of Ohio; Fred
O. Blue, of Barbour; P. W. Morris,
of Wood; and C. W. Swisher, of
Marion, Kanawha and Tyler.?
Wheeling Intelligencer.
There will be lots of fun at the
Mason County Fair.
THE GREATEST
PERFORMANCE
DURING THE FAIR VAS BY THE CREAT
HORSES, HAPPY J. AND HAPPY F.
The pent horsed Happy J., whicl
trotted the first heat in the matel
race on Thursday over Shattucl
Park track in SslgK and the second
in 8:10?, with his sir^ear old daugh
ter, Happy F., at his saddle the en
tire way are the greatest sire and
daughter ever shown in the United
States, which was also the greatest
performance of the kind on record.
These two horses are the champ
ion trotters of the sUte and are as
sured a warm welcome from Park
ersburg race goers if they should re
turn here.
They are owned by Mr. I. W.
Supplee, of Bryn Mawr, Pa., and
have been trained and raced by R. P.
Liter, of Point Pleasant, W. Va.,
who has shown remarkable skin in
developing two such grand perform
ers.?Parkensburg Sentinel.
DAM LOCATED
TWO DAIS PLANNED BETWEEN HUNT
DiGTON AND NUMBER 26. '
Recent development indicate that
the government authorities have ma- ,
terially changed their plans wi3i ref
erence to the location of locks and
dams in this part of the Ohio river,
and that this change will probably
work to the betterment of the local
situation.
Early this week a corps of govern
ment engineers landed at Swan
Creek, and, going ashore began mak
ing surveys which they declared \ ?.
would be termed in the government
records Dam 27 A.^ This dam is t?,jQ
miles below Dam 26.
From the same authority it is
learned that another part of this
plan includes Dam 27 B, which is to
be located about half way between
Proctorville and Dog Ham Bar.
The surveys for both these d.ims will
be completed while the engineers arc
in this part of the river, and the
plans forwarded to the authorities at
Washington.
Dam 28, which is to be located a
comparatively short distance below
Huntington, will afford a navigable
stage between all the cities of this
region including Gallipolis, Point
Pleasant and l'omeroy.
The section of the river betweet
Portsmouth and Gallipolis has beet .
fairly alive with government engi
neers for three weeks.
A LAZY BOY'S INVENTION.
The long-handled shovel has made
over three hundred thousand dollars^ -
for its inventor, and the inventor was
a lazv, shiftless boy of sventeen nam
ed Reuben Davis, whose father lived
in Vermont at the time. He set
Reuben to digging dirt and loading
it on a wagon, and the short-liandled
shovel made the boy's back ache.
One afternoon when his father was
; away, he took out the short handle
' and substitued a long one, and found ?
the work much easier. When Mr.
J Davis reached, home Reuben got a
(whipping; but after the old gentle
j man had nsed the shovel himself, he
saw that it was a good thing, and had
i it patented. Thev are now manu
factured almost by the million.
WANTED A REST.
What the people of this state need
is a good long rest from legislation of
all kinds and be allowed to become
at least partially acquinted with the
many laws that have been enacted at
the regular, special, ordinary and ex
tra-ordinary sessions of the state leg
islature in the past *ix ? yea^.??
Grantsville News
Every man is a soloist w
comes to singing his own praises.

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