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The Point Pleasant register. (Point Pleasant, W. Va.) 1909-1939, April 20, 1910, Image 1

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POINT PLEASANT REGISTER
VOLUME 47. POINT PLEASANT. "W. VA.. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 1910. NO. 41
LARGE GRANDSTAND
iffiNC ERECTED AT BASE BALL PARK?
/ WILL SEAT 300 PEOPLE.
Work began yesterday on the fine
new grandstand at the Point Pleas
?ant-Gallipolis ball park. The stand
will cost between two and three hun
dred dollars and will have a seating
capacity of better than three hun-;
dred. The balance of the lumber
necessary to complete the fence, is
expected here daily and upon its ar
rival work will be resumed along that
line with the intention of completing
it by the tame the players begin to
arrive which will be about the 25th.
Two more players have been sign-'
ed, one of them being i pitcher.
The following is a list of the stock
holders to date: H. H. Henry,
John E. Brown, W. YV. Baxter, D.
Marshall, C. YV. Alexander, Alex'
Kelso, J. H. Hutchinson, Clyde C.
. Ingles,E. P. Arlington, L. S. Knapp,;
YV. W. Riley, YV. YV. Bryan, Spen
cer Hotel, Ed. YVinegar, L. S. Ech
? ols, A. B. YY'arring, Homer Smith,
Geo. Poffenbarger, C. B. Smith, ?
John G. Stortz, Rankin YY'iiey, O.
A. Roush, J. C. Franklin, A. L. !
Cottrell, J. S. Spencer, B. Franklin, '
Sr., B. Franklin, Jr., Sam Greenlee,
C. V. Rumer, YV. P. Hubbard, C.
Consor, Sam L. Parsons, Fred Smith.
G. YV. Cossin, J. Friedman & Co., !
Chas. E. Stone, J. YY\ Hoover, Na
than B. Scott, J. P. Austin, John
Rock, Fred Burks, T. Stribling, YY".
YV. Sigler, F. V. Butcher, James R.
Short, A. B. McCulloch, H. A. Bar-'
bee, P. B. Buxton, Lee Arlington,
M. A. YY'illiams, John Price, Filson 1
Bros., C. F. Smith, T. S. Hanes,!
Sommerville & Somerville, Roy Russ
ell Stone, Chas. Buxton, J. M. Fad-j
ley.
The Uniforms are here and will be '
?n display in J. Friedman's window
today. The uniform to be used by j
the team at home is white with
black trimmings. The one for use
away from home is a blueish gray
?trimmed in black.
Playing Manager "Reddy" Mack ;
arrived Monday night and will assist'
Manager Henry in fixing up the!
grounds. The different batteries will ?
l>e here Friday and the balance of j
the players will report next Monday. !
The $500.00 bonus insureing that:
this team will complete the season is
on deposit at The Merchants Nation
al Bank, and everything in base ball I
circles is moving with a vim.
The following players have signed !
up:
Jos. Mack, 2nd base.
Everett T. Morgan, catcher.
John Smith, outfielder.
David E. Glenn pitcher.
Robt. Harrison, pitcher.
Elmer Daughertv, c., outfld.
D. M. Park, outfielder.
' Stuart Burdett Sd base.
Paul Y'alentine, infielder.
Henry Hamilton, outfield.
Harve Robinett, infielder.
Manuel Shafer pitcher.
Ed. YV. Kuehn pitcher.
Harry H. Crow, outfielder.
Ernest Gilmore, catcher.
Fred Martin, infielder.
YVm. Conrov, catcher.
Fred H. Mullenkamp, 1st base.
Chas. Schallick, catcher.
Horace Brown, pitcher.
B. Young, catcher.
EXHIBITION DAY.
There is some talk among the Y'ir
ginia Y'allev leaguers, of having an
exhibition day in one of the cities in
the league, possibly Huntington,
shortly alter the owning of the sea
son. Fungo hitting, long distance
throwing, bunting and circling the
sacks against time will be some of the
features of the gala day. Each and
every town in the circuit will send
champions to compete for the honors
on exhibition day, and the town that
lands* the event will be considered
lucky.?Huntington Advetiser.
Mr. L. R. Campbell has returned
to his home at Norfolk, V"a., his
mother remaining here for a visit
with her daughter, Mrs. J. B.
Tippett.
BOILER EXPLODES
ONE DEAD AND THREE OTHERS FATALLY
SCALDED WHEN BROILER LET GO.
Madison, Boone County was the
scene of a horrible accident last Fri
day morning, when the saw mill
boiler, owned and operated by Ex
Sherriff Jas. McDermitt exploded.
Thornton and McDermott, well
known Coal -river lumbermen, had
just erected a new mill and started
operation Friday morning, their first
work being to cut hickory rail for the
extension of their tram way tracks in
to the timberland. Although the
boiler had been tested previous to the
beginning or operation Friday,
some defect in connection with the
arrangement of the steam generating
apparatus caused a boiler explosion
which completely wrcckcd the plant.
The big boiler was severed in the
middle. The half containing the fire
box was thrown two hundred feet back
ward, while the front half was buried
twenty feet, where it lodged against
a >ock.
Wyatt Larue, a block setter, was
thrown sixty feet, and both legs were
broken.
He was so horribly scalded that the
skin fell from every part of his body,
and he died in two hours after the
accident.
Gordon Fitzwater, formerly of Mil
ton, was thrown for a great distance,
and was also so badly scalded that his
life is despaired of.
R. L. Gibbeat, the fireman, who
was standing at the rear of the en
gine, was thrown fifty feet and landed
in the branches of an elm tree. He
was taken dWri unconscious and may
die.
The most peculiar experience, and
at the same time the least harmful,
was that which befel Harry Chandler
"otf-bearer.''
Chandler was te ? feet in the rear
of the boiler when the explosion oc
curred. He was thrown into the bed
of the creck fifty feet from where he
was standing when the shock came,
and when he regained consciousness
was sitting in the sandy bottom of
the small stream, in six inches of
water, unhurt except being slightly
scalded, and numbed by the shock
of the explosion.
Of the six men around the mill
when the explosion came, two who
were standing nearer than some of
those who were injured escape un
hurt, except that their eyes and
cheeks were slightly scalded by the
rebouud of the steam.
J. FRED EADS DEAD.
J. Fred Ends died at bis home near
town, last Thursday night, after an
illness of over two years, during
which he suffered untold agony, from
the dreaded malady cancer.
He was a man of excellent habits,
fine moral character, a member of
both the subordinate and the chapter
branches of the I. O. O. F. lodge of
which he was an enthusiastic worker.
He was 02 years old at the time of
his death, having lived in this vicinity
all of his life.
He is survived by a kind and lov
ing wife, who did all in her power to
relieve his sufferings until the end
came.
The funeral was held from his late
home, Sunday, under the auspices of
the lodge of Odd Fellows, and was
largely attended. Interment follow
ed at Lone Oak cemetery.
CONTROL OF AH EASTERN COMPANY
IS BOUGHT BY HOYT FOR THE NEW CINCINNATI LIFE-DEAL GIVES CONTROL OF
HARTFORD LIFE, OF CONNECTICUT-HAS FIVE MILLION ASSETS.
Officiafannouncement was made
in the East yesterday that the Cin-I
cinnati Life Insurance Company,
which has been organized here by
George B. Cox and associates, has
purchased the controlling stock in
the Hartford Life Insurance Com
pany, of Hartford, Conn.
The Hartford Life has a stock
capital of $500,000, of which the
controlling interest is owned by Gen
eral Geo. E. Keeney, who is Presi
dent of the company. The Hartford
Life, had, according to its official re-'
ports on January 1, 1910, had assets!
^f Si',54!. and insurance in force '
aggregating $52,654,608. The pre-'
mium income of I OOP was $2,.'513,796!
and the aggregate in<-ume from all'
sources, including premium, was
$2,513,(51. There was jwiid to
policy holders during that' year!
?M,"93,S7I and the total disburse-'
COL COOPER
-I
PARDONED BY GOV. PATTERSON-SON
WILL BE RE-TRIED.
Nashville, Tenn., April IS?While j
the supreme court of Tennessee to- !
day was confirming the conviction of
Colonel Duncan B. Cooper for the
slaying, on November 9, 1908, In a.
Nashville street, of former United
States Senator E. W. Carmack, Gov
i ernor Patterson wrote a full pardon I
for the defendant, declaring that in
his belief Colonel Cooper was not
guilty. The supreme court remand
ed for retrial the case of Robin Cooper,!
convicted of the some crime as his!
father.
"lhe situation is tense to-night, be
cause of allegations by friends of Car- ?
mack that politics entered into the'
case. It is probable that Robin
Cooper will never be re-tried, it is
said. Both Coopers had been sen-!
tenced to 20 years imprisonment.
The court was divided both in con-.
firming the sentence of Colonel;
Cooper and in remanding the ease of
his son. It was while Chief Justice
Beard was reading a dissenting opin
ion in the case of Colonel Coo|>er, I
that Governor Malcolm R. Patterson
pardoned the defendant, declaring in
the document:
Being thoroughly familiar with
the record, having read all the testi
mony and testified to certain facts
within my personal knowledge, it is
neither desirable nor necessarv to
delay action. In my opinion, neither
of the defendants is guilty and they
have not had a fair and impartial
trial, but were convicted contrary to
| the law and evidence.
1 "The proof showed that Robin
Cooper killed the deceased and that
Colonel Cooper did not fire a shot.
W ithout reflection upon the court,
it is inconceivable in my mind, and
repugnant to every principle of jus
tice, that a man should be found
, guilty of murder who was not in a
conspiracy to kill, and when in fact
he did not kill."
Colonel Cooper was still at the
eapitol when th* pardon was entered
, in the secretary of state's office. He
was at once surrounded by a crowd
of friends seeking to congratulate
him. The reversal in his son's case
seemed to please him to the exclusion
of his own freedom.
ments were $2,251,816.
The Cincinnati Life Insurance
Company has been in the process of
organization, that is in so far as float
ing its capital is concerned, for some
months. John G. Hoyt is the Presi
dent, Louis A. Ireton, Vice-Presi
dent ; Herman Brock man, Secretary;
George B. Cox, Treasurer; Dr. James
F. Heady, Medical Director, and
Charles H. Davis, President of the
Second National Bank; B. G. GofT,
of Winchester, Ky., and J. S.
Spencer, of Point Pleasant, W. Va.,1
both bankers, members of the board.
The company has its offices in the
Second National B;ink building.
Herman Brockman, the Secretary,
when seen last night said: "Mr.
Hoyt is Kast on business. I have
heard nothing of the deal, and you
must get all your information in the
East."?Cincinnati Enquirer.
INJUNCTION OUT
RESTRAINING C. & 0. AND LAKE SHORE
FROM TAKING OVER K. &. M.
Columbus, O., April IS.?A tem
porary order was granted by Judge
E. B Dillon today enjoining the
Chesapeake and Ohio Railway com
pany, the Lake Shore and Michigan
Southern and the Hocking Valley
from taking any further ste|>s to
place the Kanawha and Michigan
railway under the control of the
roads enjoined, under the terms of
a sale made here recently.
The purchasers are enjoined from
voting or holding the stock of the
Kanawha and Michigan and the
Kanawha and Michigan is enjoined
from accepting the purchasing com
panies as its owners. April 19 w;is
named as the date for the hearing.
The injunction suit was filed last
week by David H. Gould and John
S. Stanton, of New York, minority
stockholders of the Kanawha and
Michigan.
DEMOCRAT LANDSLIDE
IN THE THIRTY-SECOND CONGRESSIONAL
DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.
This morning, as we go to press,
the daily papers all over the United
States are full of the great victory
achieved by the : -eraocratic party in
the 32nd Congressional District of
New York.
James S. Havens has been elected
to Congress over his Republican op
ponent George W. Aldrich by 5900
majority, the same district having in
1908 elected a Republican by 101t>7,
this showing a change of feeling of
over 1 tiOO votes. What is cause for
still greater rejoicing is because Mr.
Havens was elected on a platform
advocating tariff reform.
COOK INDICTED.
Charleston, W. Va., April 12.?
Charging that John W. Cook accept
ed $4,500 for a house and lot and was
in turn to resign from the citv council
and that F. W. Hanke, a liquor dealer
formerly of Wheeling, gave him the
money on that understanding, both
were indicted by the grand jury here.
VIRGINIA VALLEY LEAGUE SCHEDULE 1910
aT
IT. PLEASANT
GALLIPOLIS
J u ne S75
Jane 11.12, 13.
July 21,31.
Aug ?.*.9.14.15.
ASHLAND
CATLETTSBURG
A1
ASH LAND
^ATLETrSBURC.
May so. 2i.
June 17, IS.
July 12,13,14,25,26.
Aug. 16.17. IX.
May ;U, 29, jw. SI.
June 19.26, 27. 28.
\ nt;. 19.2u, 21.
Aug. 28.
AT
CHARLESTON
May .?.o...
J une 7, 8. 9.10.
July 4.SI, 22, 23.
Sept. f?.
J udc 1, -, a, Zf, ?3U.
July 1.2.
July 15,16.
Aug. 4. ft. 6.
AT
HUNTINGTON
>1 uy \ y, iu.
Llune 20.21. 22.
July 9.10.11.
Aug. 30. 31: Sept. 1.
May l'.?
July 3.4 u. m.
July is. 19. an.
Sept. 2. :<. 4.
AT
MONTGOMERY
?H) ii, 1 ?.
July 6. 7. 8.
July 17,18.19.
_ rtrpt.2. 3. 4.
AT
PARKERSBU RGj
May 2b. 27.
June 23, 24,25.
July 28,29,30.
Aug. 11.12.13.
CHARLESTON
?May 17. 1?, lit.
July 4.5,28,29,30.
Aug. 25,26, 27.
Sept.
May -??>, 2;. 2?\
June 4,5.6.
June 17,18,19.
Aug 7.8.9.
June 7.?.??.
June 14,15.16.
July 9.10.11.
Aug. 23.24. 25.
HUNTINGTON
May ?i,24.2a.
June 23,24,25.
Aug. 4. 5, 6.
Aug. 22. 23. 24.
May It, ]?>.
June 11,12,13.
July 17,24.
Aog. 14. !?'?. 30. 31.
May n y. lit]
May 22,23,24,25.
July 21.
Aug. 1,2.20. 21.
May 2?.
J urn* 26.27,28.
July 10,11.18.19,20.
Ang. 2*: Kept. s. 4
lr
MONTGOMERY
May j. 6,7.
July 4,6,7,8,31.
Ang. 1,2,3
Sept. 5.
May ii, 12, ii.
June 11,15, 16.
July 25,20,37
Aug. 11.15.
13.
May 29. .iu, ;U.
Iune 1L 12,13.
Uuly21,22.23,34.
Aug. 14.15.
May 2n, 21,,
June 7,8,6.
July 15,16,17.
Aug. 19.20.21.
PARKERSBURG
May 20,27.2s.
June 29,30
July 2. 15.16.
Vug. 10.11.12.13.
Hay 11,12. IS.
June 1 2,3,4.
Jane 14,15,16.
Aug. 1,2.
May 11, 12, l.i.
June 4,5,6.
June 20,21,22.
Aug. 7.8.9.
May ft. 9. lu.
May 2J, 24,25.
July 21,22,23.
Aug. 26, 27,29.
[May 22. Ji.
Iune 23,21,25.
July 12,13,14.
\ug. 1H 17.18.19.
May K ai.
June 20.21. 22.
J oly 6,7,8, ft.
Aug. 22,23,24.
Juue 1. 2.o.
J une 27,28.
July 28,29.30.
Aag. 27.28.29.
May 14.1">, iu.
J une 29,30.
Inly 2,12.13.14.
Aag. 16,17,1\
May 17, i?, 19.
J une 17, is, 19.
July 23.28,27.
?Vug 30.81: Sept. l.
PT. PLEASANT
GALUPOLI8
nay ^o, 7.
July 3,4,4.
Aag. 3,4.5, 4.
Sept. o, 5.
OLDEST PEDAGOGUE
IN STATE CELEBRATES HIS 80TH BIRTH
DAY-TAUGHT HERE 30 YEARS. i
Prof. \V. J. Kenny, father of Will :
Kenny, Jr., of this office, celebrated ;
his eightieth birthday last week.'
Mr. Kcnnv has been living in Park-:
ersburg for the past six years, mak
ing his home with his daughter, Mrs.
Elmer Withee.
Prof. Kenny resided in Mason
county for forty years and was prin
cipal of the Point Pleasant schools
for thirty-two rears. He also taught
at Lewisburg, Charleston, Winfield,
Buffalo, Marshall College, Hunting
ton, Welsh, McDowell county, Ash
land and Greenup, Ky., Mason City
and Moundsville.
PROF. W. J. KF.XNV.
Hundreds of men who are prom
inent in the state's history, many of
whom have been garnered hence, set
at his knee and imbibed learning and
good predepts. Some became Judges
and high officials; four were elected
to Congress and one was made Gov
ernor of this State.
Prof. Kenny was the recipient of
many fine and costly presents from
his many friends in Point Pleasant,
at his eightieth birthday, in Parkers
burg, last week.
A letter received from Prof. Ken
ny a few days ago says lie cxpects to
visit Point Pleasant this summer to
see the ball games, and to keep the
boys about the SjH-neer Hotel in
good humor?especially Griff Smith
and Jim Hoolf.
GIGAX?STOKE.
Paul Gig;ix, of Masnn City, and
Miss Bessie Stone, of this place,
were quietly married at the M. E.
Church parsonage yesterday after
noon, Rev. Pullin officiating.
Mr. and Mrs. Gigax are both too
well known to need any introduction
| to the people of this eitv. Mrs.
Gigax has lived here almost all of
her life and has the respect and
esteem of all. She is a young lady
many graces of mind and person,
who is capable of filling the home
she will adorn with happiness and
will prove to be truly a helpmate and
companion by the husband she has
chosen to honor with her hand.
Mr. Gigax, while a resident of our
neighboring city, has a wide acquain
tance here and is admired for his
good qualities.
They will make their future home
at Mason City, where a house ready
furnished awaits them. W e wish
them a long and prosperous life.
BASE BALL DANCE.
A tremendous crowd gathered at
The Hotel Spencer's Assembly Hall
to trip the light fantistic toe, last
Friday night. The Point Pleasant
orchestra furnished the music for this
enjoyable affair, and everybody pres
ent had a jolly, good time.
Some Delaware friends were week
end guests at the Capehart home
i stead near town.
SPEND $100,000
AT KAiNAUGA-L & M. TRACKS TO BE
RAISED 22 FEET.
The K. & M. has let the contract
for raising the approach to the Ka
nauga bridge to John B. Lindsey and
work v ill soon be commenced. It
is proposed to raise the track 20 feet
above the Hocking Valley, which will
be crossed on a trestle, and will be
run along the hills back of the H.
V. track to a point near the school
house on George,s creek, where a
depot will be built. With this im
provement it is thought one engine
can do the work now required of two.
In connection with this improvement
the railroad has made several pur
chases of land containing valuable
gravel beds in that vicinity. Eminett
Lyle has sold the railroad 20 acres
of his farm without with his residence
for $8000 which is three times as much
as he jwiid for the whole farm of 60
I acres. Joe Trickier has received
! $1+00 for less than three acres and
the Gilmorc sisters of Point Pleasant
$1300 for 4 acres. Mad Ramsey got
approximately $2500 for 5 acres, part
of which was settlement of a suit
against the company. Extensive
work is to be done all along the line
j changing grades and curves, placing
new passing tracks which will almost
S be a double track from Corning to
i the river. The offices of the K. &
i M. will be moved from Columbus to
j Charleston.
!
j ACCEPTS A CALL TO POINT PLEASANT.
Rev. Hunter Davidson of the
Episcopal church of this place has
accepted a call to the Episcopal
church in Point Pleasant and will
: leave for that place about May 1st.
I Rev. Davidson has had two calls from
; prominent churches recently, one in
' Point Pleasant and the other in
Michigan and has decided to accept
the Point Pleasant appointment. This
is an old historical church with *
large membership.
Mr. Davidson is a very able minis
ter, a thorough courteous and scholar
ly gentleman and goes to Point
Pleasant with the kindest regards
and very best wishes of the people
of Hinton. This paper takes pleas
' ure in bearing testimony to the high
1 character of Rev. Davidson and wishes
1 fur him and his family much happi
ness in their new field.?Independent
| Herald, Hinton.
CUTS OUT GAWPOUS!
A Colurrlbus paper has an item to
the effect that the Hocking Valley
Railroad is to be shortened twenty
six miles between Pomeroy and Col
umbus, the change requiring an 1800
foot tunnel back of Pomeroj-. Such a
move could mean only onething to
Gallipolis so far as the Hocking is
concerned, and that is, a divorce.??
Gallipolis Tribune.
It is also rumored that the B. &
O. will discontinue the depot at
Gallipolis Ferry. Should this hap
pen, it will leave Gallipolis only one
railroad, the K. & M.
DASHNER WINS HIS FIRST GAME.
The Decatur, Illinois, Herald,
gives Dyke Dashner quite a nice
write up, in an account of the first
game played there. Dashner had
nine strike outs to his credit and had
one two base hit. The score, stood
10 to 1 in favor of team that Dash
ner was pitching for. His many
friends here will be pleased to learn
that he has started the season so
auspiciously.
ABNEY ROSS.
Abney Ross, aged thirty-eight
years, is dead at his home at Mason
City, as a result of cancer, with which
he has been a sufferer for a number
of months. He is survived by a wife
and five children?two daughters and
three sons. The funeral was held
from the late residence Sunday after
noon.

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