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The Volcano lubricator. (Volcano, W. Va.) 1871-1879, November 25, 1873, Image 1

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THE VOLCANO LUBRICATOR.
> ? ? ? -? ? >. nr ... .r-. ? ' T
THE CROAK Or THE WEST VIRGINIA OIL PR0DCC&R8. '??????* GEORGE P. SARGENT*, PUBLISHER & PROPRIETOR.
VOL 3. VOLCANO, WEST VA., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1873. NO. 25
. . * ?
Volcano Lubricator,
TUESDAY NOV. 25, 1873
Published every Tuesday
? IT?
? aOROa P. SARGENT.
Offlcs: No. 8, Raymond street.
Subscription Bates:
Qm int. invariably in advance, fs.oo.
flU Mentha ?* " l.H*
A<h/ertising Rates i
Om Square, oaeinsertioa, 9 s.eo
Back additional " . >.00
vm Square one year, aj.oo
" " six Bran t hi, IJ.OO
? " three months 10,0D
Om Foarth Column one year, 40.00
? " aiz months. jo. 00
*? " three montiis,. *3.00
Pi* Half Column one year, Jo.oo
*? 1 " eix months, 60.00
*? " three month*, Jo. 00
?m Column one year, . . 140.00
" ?? aiz months, 90.00
*? ? three mentis, 70.00
Isnl aoticea so cents per line.
la notice Inserted for lesa than ane dollar.
All yearfy advertisers pay quarterly in ad
a?ce. < w v.. ~ ? - - - ?
Parkersbura Advertisements,
)*IN A. HUTCHINSON, J*. DAVE D. JOHNSON.
/fcrrcHiNSON & johnson,
Alt or my $ and Counstllors at Lan\
Court Square, PARKERSBURf*. W. V.
IWANN HOUSE. ? B. Gilbbrt,
Proprietor, Parkersburg, W. V*. This 1* the
anly first-class Hotel in PsirkersbuTgi It is
fitted up with all the modern improvements.
Pure soft water is constantly supplied tbm
Ohio River, and is lighted with gas and
heated with steam. Strict attention given
to {nests. It i* head-quarters fof oil Itlen
'"I ? tf.
w
M. H. BUSH,
merchant tailor.
Court Street, PARKERsBCKG. WEST VA'
Always keeps on hand a large and well se
lected stock of the best of Cloths. Cassimers
V* eatings, Ac. Suits made to order and upon 1
the anortestnoce. All *ofk Warranted 1 A
a large spply of Oeht's Fumiahing Ooods al- |
%?TS ou h*ud augV7i-<Y. '
J. R. MEHEN,
IJt
Groceries, Produce,
I*
Ab4 a rail ?uppl/ ?f ff*?h 1th and
*?"" " "
ojrtter* alwava on hand.
Market atreat, rxit t? Market Houtc,
Parkeraburg, W. V*. mavay^t.
P PWAjRD BRAIDON.
J3IOXEEH
TOBACCO WORKS
PARJCERSBURG. WEST VA.
W
M. DILS,
Gen. Fir*, Marin* 4t Lift Intnrance\
Agent.
Represents the following well kaown and
y?p?ltr Insurance Companies.
CoatinanUl las. Co., of New Tork
(Cash Assetts over 9a.ooo.ooo.)
Wool* In*. Co., of Colombua, Ohio.
(Cash Assetts over'.|S79,ooo.)
Vow Tork Lite Ins. Co. Naw Tork,
Cash Assetts 000,000; sn'l income |S,ooo.- 1
m'
OCce oa Market street, abovaCaurt Sauare, ,
rmb?I, W V*. I
uarvsi, I
pURNITURB WARE-ROOMS
?OF?"
D. SCH?FER,|
Ann St., Parkertburg.
JIEDSTEADS. SETTEES,
SAFES, SOFAS.
WARDROBES, BUREAUS,
BOCKiMC -CHAIRS. EASY-CHAIRS.
WQSTi%G-BW%KJt. IMPROVED BUNDS,
LOCVGES, CHAIRS,
KCTU RE- FRAME*.
PARLOR FURNITURE,
MIRRORS OF ALL SIZES. Ac.,
Aad e*ery variety of articles usually kept
i? a first class furniture store. Manufactured
and imported. Alt articles bought at this
?tore are warranted t? fee as represented whet
?re^aied. Any article maaufactured on tl t
shortaat Mticc. aprao'7?-6ra
^HIS SPACE
IS PAID FOR
BY THE
WEST VA.
OIL & OIL LAND
COMPANY,
Who are engaged 90 constant
ly in
SHIPPING OIL
That thev have not time to prepaie
an advertisement this week.
AddrtH,
Petr6l**m> Wert Vm.
Parkersburg Advertisements.
'-pHL PLACE TO GET
THE CHEAPEST AND BEST
Groc*riis, provisions, Grain and Pre*
duc?s i* ai
MARTIN & GILBERT'S,
Market atreat, Parkersburg, W. V*
?yHOMPSON & JACKSO
W HOLE9ALE GROCERS ARO Ll^UOR
Dealers,
moral Forwarding and Commission
fy|E R C H A N T^
Corner of Ann and Kanawha Street*,
Parkeraburg W. Va.
W? will forward all (joods to Volcano
promptly And in good condition from all point*, j
\V? fefef to Thomas Schilling 4 Co., the '
O'Brien Bros, and others. All goods consigned
to ollf cafe will be forwarded without making j
it necessary for the parties ordering, corres
ponding with us.
J. H. Stribling,
DEALER IX
HATS, CAPS , BOOTS AXD\
SHOES. AND GENTS FURNISHING
Goods, Court Square, Parkersburg. j
West Va, april 2q ly.
J W. HITESHEW
Commission Merchant
? Aad Staler la?
Flou Grain, Haled H(tyf etc.
Ground Fttds and Corn Mioul r. Spec
ialty.
ANN STREET,
PARKERSBURG, WEST VA.
Mayit^tU.
gCRCHB* BUTCHER,
SCALERS IK
Hardware, Iron, Steel,
Fails, y~Mtsf bolts j Etc.
Blacksmith*', Carpenters' and Coop
cr?' Tool#.
Belting and Packing,
Fire Brick and Claj.
Drill Ropes. Sand pump Ropes, and
all kinds of cordage ? including
WIRE ROPE,
all sizes.
Bungs, Tank iron, Rivets and all that
is necessar> for the Oil Trade, also
a full stock of
WOODEN WARE;
And the celebrated cutlerr of Rogers'
Wostenholm's, pocket and table.
Also Drain Pipes suitable for chim
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR
STOCK;
Ceurt street, opp. ad Nat. Bank,
Parkersburg, W. Va.
J UBRICATING OILS
L. D. KRAFT & CO.
PRODUCERS AMD DEALERS IK
WEST VIRGINIA
NATURAL LUBRI
CATING OILS.
S*U Profriiiori ?f tit Wtll Known
Ad ires* L . D. KRAFTS Co.
P*rkor$1turQ.
Parker sbu ry A dvertisem en ts.
S. NEWBERGER,
Csrart St., Parkersburg, Weit V?.
Juat retarned f torn the Eastern cities with
the moat complete assortment of
FANCY GOODS,
NOTIONS
EVER EXHIBITED IN THIS CITY,
And ha very respectfully invites the citizen*
of Volcano and vicinity to call and examine
his stock. Aa entire new stock of
CARPETS,
OIL CLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
RUGS,
WINDOW BLINDS, BLANKETS,
COMFORTS
Orders received from Volcano will receive
carefully attention, and prices guaranteed.
When vou come to Parkersburg do not lail to
call and examine my good.*.
REMEMBER THE PL A CE ! !
SAM'L. NEWBERGEK
Parkkksuurg, Wkbt Va.
Fall & winter
DRY GOODS,
AND
BED SPREADS.
jV OVELTY FOUNDRY
? AXD ?
Machine Works.
JOHX COOK ,
Machinists Blacksmith
Engines, Saw Mills, Stave Machines,
etc., generally on hand.
Shafting, Pullejt, Hangers, and all
kinds of Machinery, made t*
order on short notice.
HEAVY & LIGHT CASTINGS,
HEATING STOVES, &c.
Oil irell Tools
of best brand of Iron,
Prompt atteatioa paid to Repairs.
Kanawha St., bet. Marhtl and Juliana
Streets,
PARKERSBURG, W. VA.
jAugvjtf
^llE MAMMOTH
NEW FURNITURE
WARE-ROOMS
OF
W.H.WARNE& CO
Court St., Parkersburg,
(b'irst door below First National Ilank) if now
open. Those who are desirous of purchasing
Suf trior Furniture
? a/?
Reasonable Prices
Caanotdo better than examine the work at
tkis establishment, before making their
selections.
Inquiries by mail promptly answered.
I Their Stock is complete, comprised in part of
Marble and Wood Top
fSy"Tables and Stands,
yyLadie^' and Gentlemen's
|3F" Writing Desks,
ISfLotzs Patent Spring Bed Lounge,
er Wardrobes and Bookcases,
,yCamp and Easy Chairs,
|j^~Bureaus and Sideboards,
fff* Refrigerators
Window Shades.
?all kin?s or ?
COFFIXS
Constantly on ksaJ.
We sis prepared to nianutacture to ordci
snTthnig in our line, in the very best style.
We hare none but first-class workinea, and
all responsible orders from Volcano and vi
linity, will be promptly filled, aad goods
warraated as represented.
Remember the flace.
PARKERiBURC, WEST VA.
? ]aae?c 7?tf.
1858, 1873,
J.G. BLACKFORD,
Forwarding and Commission
MERCHANT.
Pork-packer, r.nd curer of th? celebrated
brands of Maryland Sugar Cured Hams, and
Shoulders and lireakfast llacou.
? DEALER IN?
Staple and Fancy Groceries. Provisions. Liq
uors. Argosr and othe? choice brands of flour
Afeat tor Pomeroy Salt Co. Pomeroy Iron
Co'?. Nails. Louisville I.itne and Cement,
Xenia Powder Co. Ac. Ac.
Ann Street, above Coart, Farkersbnrg,
Wow Vs. mav4-t?o
Fortry,
That Boy.
Is the house turned topsy turvcy?
Does it ring from street to roof?
Will the racket still continue,
Spite of all your mild reproof?
Are you Often in a flutter?
Are you sWr?e<>mcs thrilled with joy?
Then I have my grave suspicions,
That you have at home? that Boy.
Are the walls and tables hammered?
Are your nerves and ink upset?
Have two eyes, so bright and roguish,
Made ypu every care forget?
Have your garden-beds * prowler.
Who delights but todestaoy?
These are wcll-knawn indications,
That you have at norffe ? that Boy.
Have you seen him playing circus?
With his head upon the mat,
And his heels in mid-air twinkling?
For his audience, the cat?
Do yau ?ver stop to listen.
When his merry pranks annoy?
Listen to a voice that whispers.
You were once just like? that Boy?
Have yott heard of broken windows.
And within nobody to blame?
Have you seen a trowsered urchin.
Quite unconscious of the same ?
Do you love a teasing mixture,
Of perplexity and joy?
You have a dor.en daughters.
But 1 know you've got? that Boy.
The Currency Pressure.
Notwithstanding the suspension of
work in large manufacturing establish
ments, nnd commercial failures of
houses ol extensive connections, the
financial condition, as viewed b y the
New York papers, presents a more en
couraging aspect than recent events
indicate. The stagnation in the circu
lating medium growing out of a gene
ral want of confidence, as all know, is
now the chief difficult/, and the New
York papers of Tuesday particularly
comment on this phase of the situation.
The Times savs:
"The money in circulation was too
little to hold up stocks, pay for the
enormous crops of grain and cottom
and move them to the seaboard. The
panic then began on account ef the
stringency in money, which was not
artificial, but brought about in the or
dinary course of events. Confidence
has been Shaken now bf the numerous
failures and the clatter concerning the
instability of the moneyed institutions.
A restoration of public confidence in
the safety of the banks, and an ample
supply of money, will bring about
speedy recovery. As the panic began
on account of monetary stringency so
it will end by relaxation in the rates
of interest and proofs furnished that
this will be permanent. We hare the
money now. There is more in circu
lation by fifty millions of dollars than
six weeks ago. The bank s have drawn
largely on their legal reserve. The
government has paid out the surplus
of $15,000,000 in purchases of bonds
and has also drawn largely upon the
$44,000,000 reserve. Millions of gold
have been sentorer from the Bank of
England, which are now in active use
here. The country needed more mon
ey, and it has been obtained. The
truth is that before long currency will
be a glut, and four per cent be consi
dered a high rate of interest. Every
manufactory that closes, and every
iron forge that shuts down instead of
adding to the general stringency in
money tends to make it more easy.
Money is dearest when there is the
greatest call for it to use in business
requirements. It is cheap when it
seeks investment instead of being
sought for."
A Nashville man had occasion to go
to Memphis over the Northwestern
road last week. There were but few
passengers aboard, and during the
night the conductor came and sat down
by him. "Goin' to Memphis, are you
stranger?" he asked. "Yes, sir," said
the Nashville man. "Mighty rough,
ain't it?" querried the conductor, with
a yawn. "Very," was the reply.
"Last time I went over the road this
car we're in now was upset, and a man
was killed all to smash," said the coin
municativc ticket-puncher, with an
other yawn. Then, he added: "I've
got the most reckless engineer on the
road with me to night, too; but I hope
we wonV hare any accidents." "I cer
tainly hope we will not," responded
the passenger, with uneasiness. "Well,
I don't know as it would make much
difference to you," said the conductor
cheerfully, "you'll die anyway, if you
are goin' to Memphis."
Teacher ? "Who was the first man?"
Head scholar ? "Washington; he was
the first in war, first in ? "Teacher ? "
No. no; Adam was the first man."
"O, if you're talking of foreigners, 1
t'posc he was."
Kentucky Petroleum.
Some years ago, parties following
the indications, which geology pointed
out in Kentucky, and neglecting the
mere "surface shows" of the carboni
ferous limestome, struck the Glasgow
region of Southern Kentucky, where
the formation overlying the Genesee
shale is mountain limestone, in places
arenaceous, vesicular and cavernous,
furnishing thus the requisite conditions
for oil accumulation, in many instan
ces affording large reservoirs for the
storage of the valuable petroleum.
Oil was found in large quantities on
Boyle's creek, Barren county, near
Glasgow, but while comparatively free
from naptha, it vra& found of a very
sulphurous nature, and all attempt at
refining it and making it a marketable
product signally failed, although scien
tists and chemists tried their hands
at !t. One of the wells the "Kinslow
well," sunk by the "Boyd Creek Oil
Company (since dissolved), flowed in
a copious stream for four years into the
creek, a perfect waste of a valuable
product. About five years ago, aftei
thousand* of dollars had been sunk ir.
abortive efforts to refine the Glasgow
region petroleum .Messrs. Chess
Charley & Co. bought the land cm
bracing many old bores from whicl
the oil was escaping and began opera
tions. They have there, ten produc
ing wells, some of them with a natura
flow cil and others requiring the useoi
the pump. By a process known onlj
to themselves, the firm has succeeded
in refining the petroleum ana making ?
fine marketable article of it. The pro
duct of these wells is from one thous
and to twelve hundred barrels pet
month. The oil is conveyed in tanki
to the refinery in this city where it un
dergoes the proper treatment.
The rapid development of this valtta
hie commercial product so near Louis
ville, and the inevitable increase foi
the future are fraught with good augu
ry of the future commercial importance
of our city. It has hitherto been gen
crally believed that the experiments in
boring for oil In Western Kervtuck*
.proved conclusively that there were
nothing but "surface shows" to be
found, and ihat all money invested in
such enterprises was only thrown
away. It has been demonstrated,
however, that one of the most valuable
natural products of the earth is right
at our door, and enn be made auxiliary
to our commercial importance. Petro
leum is one of those substantial pro
ducts which holds its own on account
of the wide demand for it. A late
number of the New York Shipping
List gives the product of the oil wells
for the past ten months at nearly 300,
000.000 gallons or 5,000.000 barrels.
Three million barrels are sent abroad
annually, and from these figures may
be gained some knowledge of the ex
tent of the trade, ? Louisvil/e Courier
yournal.
Why People Dont Go to Church.
[Ry Ilenry Wanl Rcechcr.]
Why do not people go te church
more? One think? it is this, and ano
ther think* it ii this, and another thinks
it is that. You can open a church in a
a hovel, and let a voice go forth that it
has the power of touching men and you
will find it crowded and thronged.
You do not want the cob that used to
have the corn. That which men want
is sappy food, refreshing food. Men
are willing to be dealt with, to have
their sins flashed in their faces; will
ing to have their consciences aroused,
but do not want to be handled. They
want a preacher that takes hold of them
in some way and if he can do more than
that; if he can give to them that which
every man consciously needs ? some
men have aspiration, and some more
indulge in superficial thought ? and if
we can give him strength to bear his
burden .
Men that are sore in life; men who
are in sorrow; men >*ho don't know
how to bring up their children, and
who are continually having more and
more added to their flo?:k; people who
want ?o know where the next hod of
coal is coming from; people who are
afraid ofthe sheriff, men who are prick
ed with io.ooo nettles of human life?
they come to church and hear a long
disscussion on the fall of Adam. Well
that is not inopportune, but still they're
ko flat themselves that they feel as if
they would like to kno something
that deadens the struggle that is going
on with in them; they want some one
who will take part with them, a minis
ter who brings God down to the side o(
men, not a* an everlasting condemnor,
but one who brings God down as a pre
sent help in time of trouble.
Shall Cuba be Free?
It would tike but a few brief month*
to decide this question in favor of Cu
ban independence, ii the governmen
would suspend, the neutrality, laws.'
There are thousand, yes, hundreds of
thousands of brave adventurous spirit*
in this country who would then enrbP
themselves under the banner of the
republic of Cuba. In less than sr*ty
days an army of more than fifty thous
and men could be landed on the shore*
of the "Queen of the Antillies," and be
fore the coming of another spring Spa
nish power in the island would be com
pletely broken. The cold-blooded
massacre of the officers, crew and pas
sengers of the Virginius has aroused
a feeling in this country that cannot be
quelled.
The planters of Cuba are an intel
ligent, well educated class of men,
and it is no wonder that in course of
time their discontent at the tyranni
cal rule of Spain manifested itself in
open revolt. The present rebellion
commenccd in October, 1868, and has
been carried on with varying success
from that day to this. During that pe
riod the Spaniards have conducted the
war in utfer violation of the usages of
civilized nations.. The home govern
ment organized the resident .Spaniards
into a volunteer army, which numbers
about forty thousand men. These vol ?
unteers have shown themselves more
cruel and bloodthirsty than the janiza
ries formerly employed by the Turkish
sultans. The cold blooded murder of
a number of medical students in Hava
na a few years ago is or ought to be,
still fresh in the memory of American
readers. This act should hare been
deemed a sufficient excuse for the in
tervention of civilized nations in the
name of humanity. Our Government
should have interfered at the time Dr.
Houard.an American citizen, was seiz
ed imprisoned, sentenced to years of
servitude in a Spanish penal colony,
and convered to Spain, all the while
kept in irons, and finally released when
his health was broken down Our
Government went down on its knees
to Spain to implore Dr. Houard's re
lease. instead of demanding it and
hacking up the demand with sufficient
force to compel compliance with it.
This victim of Spanish crurfry was
stripped of all his earthly possessions,
and returned to this country an old man
| broken in health and spirits, and utter
ly impoverished. The American go
vernment failed to do its duty in his
case, and all because the son-in-law of
Hamilton Fish, G/ant's premier, is
employed by the Spanish government
at a princely salary, as its agent in this
country'.- We have no faith that even
now, in view of the coldblooded mur
der of the American citizens captured
on the Virginius, the government will
do anything to vindicate its stained
honor. If k'obeyed the voice of the peo
ple it would at once out itself in posi
tion to'chastiie these Castillian butch
ers. The time for apology on the
part of Spain is past. Upon the as
sembling of Congress war should be
declared against that country. In the
meantime let' the' President suspend
the neutrality laws by proclamation,
and the government would ha?e very
little to do after the declaration of war
to drive the Spaniards from the soil of
I Cuba. The work would be well nigh
accomplished before a regiment of
United States soldiers could be lanje;l
there. The blood of the American
people irup. Only per-flH the repub
lic of Cuba to open recruiting offices
in our large cities north and south, and
permit Cuban transports to take these
armed voluntesrs to Cuba, without
molestation, and the work would be
nearly accomplished before the gov
ernment would get ready to move.
The Mobile Register says that a civil
?nit for $500 was recently tried before
a jury of eight white men and four co
lored men, in Sumter county, Ala. in
which the learned jury rendered a
Terdict of manslaughter in the first de
gree. Not a member of the jury knew
a tingle letter of the alphabet. Upon
delivering the verdict, the foreman re
markedthat inasmuch as no one wa*
killed they decided to render a verdict
of man. laughter, and not of murder, a?
was originally intended. The suit waa
marely to recover a debt growing out
of a disputed business transaction.
"The aTanHerous ?oul iifimbued with
electric fire of hell. The black heart
emits the sulphurous fumes till hia
whole nature is a^sorded in one ho
mogeneous mass of hellishne??," is the
way a Tennessee editor pulverised a
person who slandered him.

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