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The Volcano lubricator. (Volcano, W. Va.) 1871-1879, December 23, 1873, Image 1

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? ' ~ .... GEORGE P. SARGENT, PUBLISHER & PROPRIETOR
?rut-: ORGAN OF THE WEST VIRGINIA OIL PRODUCERS. -
VOL 3.
NO. 29
Volcano Lubricator.
Published every Tuesday
?BY ?
GEORGE P. SARGENT.
Office: No. S, Raymond street.
Subscription Sates:
One year, invariably in advance, $2. So.
Six months 11 44 44 1.3?.
Advertising Bates:
One Square, one insertion, $ a.oo
Each additional 44 i.oo
- One Square one year, 25.00
14 44 six months. 15- 00
44 44 three months 10.00
One Foarth Column one year, 40.00
14 14 six months, 30.00
?' " three months,, 20.00
* One Half Colttmn oneyear, 70.00
?4 44 six months, to. 00
44 44 three months, 50.00
' One Column one year, 140.00
44 44 six months, 90.00
44 44 three months, 70.00
I.ocal notices to cents per line.
No notice inserted for less than one dollar.
All yearly advertisers pay quarterly in ad
ancj.
Parkersburfl Advertisements.
JOHN A. HUTCHINSON, JR. DAVE D.JOHNSON.
//TTCHINSON & JOHNSON,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, I
Court Square, PARKE RSBUR^, W. V".
SWANN HOUSE. ? B. Gilbert,
Proprietor, Parkersburg, W. Va. This is the
only first-class Hotel in Parkersburg. It is
fitted up with all the modern improvements.
Pure soft water is constantly supplied from
Ohio River, and is lighted" with gas and
heated with steam, btrict attention given
to guests. It is head-quarters for oil men
*71? tf.
w
M. H. BUSH,
merchant TAILOR .
Court Street, PARKEReBURG, WEST VA'
Always keeps on hand a large and well se
lected stock of the best of Cloths, Cassimers
Vestings, Jfcc. Suijs made to order and upon
the shortestnoce. All work warranted. A
a large spplvof Gent's Furnishing Goods al
ways ou hand aum'7?-ty. '
J. R. MEHEN,
DEALER IX
Groceries, Produce,
And & full supply of fresh fish and
oysters always on* hand.
Market street, next to Market House,
Parkersburg, TV. Va. may 27-41.
PDWARD BRAIDON.
4
PIOyEER ,
TOBACCO WORKS
J-ARKERSBURG, WEST VA.
\VM- DILS'
Gen. Fire, Marine & Life Insurance
Agent.
Represents the following' well known and
popular Insurance Companies.
Continental Ins. Co., of New York
(Cash Assetts over $.2,000,000.)
Home Ins. Co., of Columbas, Ohio.
(Cash Assetts over |S;o,ooo.)
New York Life Ins. Co. New York,
Cash Assetts J jo, 000,000; an'l income $3,ooo,
o?.;
Office on Market street, above Ceurt Square,
Parsburjj, \Y Va.
uaryai, i
pURNITURE WARE -ROOMS
D. SCH?FER,
Ann St., Parkersbuvg.
BEDSTEADS, SETTEES,
SAFES. SOFAS.
WARDROBES. BUREAUS,
ROCKING-CHAIRS, EASY-CHAIRS.
WRITING-DESKS, IMPROVED BLINDS,
I.OUNGES, CHAIRS,
PJCTURE-FRAM ES.
PARLOR FURNITURE.
MIRRORS OF ALL SIZES, &c.,
Aid every variety of articles usually kept
iu a first class furniture store, manufactured
ard imported. All articles bought at this
st >r? are warranted to be as represented when
urrhased. Any article manufactured on tl c
shortest n?tke. apr30'7X-6m
'puis SPACE
IS PAID FOR
BY THE
WEST VA.
OIL & OIL LAND
COMPANY,
lVho are engaged so constant
ly in
SHIPPING OIL
That they have not time to prepute
.an advertisement this week.
Address.
Petroleum, West Va.
Parkersburg Advertisements.
"pHi. PLACE TO GET
THE CHEAPEST AND BEST
Groceries, Proz'isions, Grain and Pro
duce, is a*
MARTIN & GILBERT'S,
Market street, Parkersburg, W. Va
HOMPSON &
Wholesale Grocers and Liquor
Dealers,
General Forwarding and Commission
ME RCHANT?
Corner of Ann and Kanawha Streets,
Parkersburg W. Va.
We will forward all goods to Volcano
promptly and in good condition from all points.
\V? refer to Thomas Schilling Jfc Co., the
O'Brien Btos. and others. All goods consigned
to our care will be forwarded without making
i t accessary for the parties ordering, corres
ponding with us.
HATS, CAPS , BOOTS AND
SHOES. AND GENTS FURNISHING
Goods, Court Square, Parkersburg.
J. H. Stribling,
DEALER IN
West Va,
april 2q iy.
W. HITESHEW
I.
Commission Merchant
? And Dealer in ?
Flou Grain, Baled Hay, etc.
Ground Feeds and Corn Meal a Spec
ially.
ANN STREET,
PARKERSBURG, WEST VA.
Maytt'7iU. v<.
gURCHEA BUTCHER,
DEALERS IX
Hardware, Iron, Steel,
Nails t Nuts, Bolts , Etc.
Blacksmiths', Carpenters' and Coop
ers' Tools.
Belting and Packing,
Fire Brick and Clay.
Drill Ropes. Sand pump Ropes, and
all kinds of cordage ? including
WIRE ROPE,
all sizes.
Bungs, Tank iron. Rivets and all that
is necessar> for the Oil Trade, also
a. full stock of
WOODEN WARE;
And the celebrated cutlery of Rogers'
Wostenholm's, pocket and table.
Also Drain Pipes suitable for chim
neys.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR
STOCK.
Court street, opp. 2d Nat. Bank,
Parkersburg, W. Va.
TUI3R1CATING OILS
L. D. KRAFT & CO.
PRODUCERS AND DEALERS IN
WEST VIRGINIA
NATURAL LUBRI
CATING OILS.
Sole Proprietors of the Well Knovjn
Ad Iress L. D. KRAFT# Co.
Pt trkvrsb nvtj.
1* arkersb urg Advert isements .
Fall & winter 1873
S. NEWBERGER,
Court St., Parkersburg, West V a.
! Just returned from the Eastern cities with
the most complete assortment of
DRY GOODS,
FANCY GOODS,
NOTIONS
EVER EXHIBITED IN THIS CITY,
And he very respectfully invites the citizens
of Volcano and vicinity to call and examine
his stock. An entire new stock of
CARPETS,
OIL CLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
RUGS,
WINDOW BLINDS, BLANKETS,
COMFORTS
AND
BED SPREADS.
Orders received from Volcano will receive
carefully attention, and prices guaranteed.
When you come to Parkersburg do not fail to
call and examine my goods.
REMEMBER THE PL A CE ! !
SAM'L, NEWBERGER
Parkeksuuug, West Va.
jV^OVELTY FOUNDRY
? AND ?
Machine Works.
JOIIX COOK,
Machinist 1 Blacksmith
Engines, Saw Mills, Stave Machines,
etc., generally on hand.
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, and all
kind3 of Machinery, made to
order on short notice.
HEAVY & LIGHT CASTINGS,
HEATING STOVES, &c.
Oil Well Tools
of host brand of Iron.
Prompt attention paid to Repairs.
Kanawha St , bet. Market and Juliana
Streets,
PARKERSBURG, W. VA.
SA"g 73*f
HTHE MAMMOTH
NEW FURNITURE
WARE- ROOMS
OF
W. H. WARNE& CO
Market St., Parkersbury ,
(Old place, below Market House) is now open.
Those who are desirous of purchasing
Superior Furniture
? at ?
Reasonable Prices
Cannot do better than examine the work at
this establishment, before making their
selections.
5??" Inquiries by mail promptly answered.
Their Stock is complete, comprised in part of
ZST Marble and Wood Top
G2jTTab!es and Stands,
JSf Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Writing Desks,
2jpLotzs Patent Spring Bed Lounge,
CS?" Wardrobes and Bookcases,
j^jfCamp and Easy Chairs,
CgTBureaus and Sideboards.
^"Refrigerators
Window Shades.
? ALL KINDS OF?
COFFINS
Constantly on hand.
Wc at* prepared to manufacture to orrtet
anything in our line, in the very best style.
We ha vv none but first-class workmen, and
all responsible orders from Volcano and vi
cinity, will be promptly filled, and goods
warranted as represented.
Remember the ?lace,^?2
PARKERSBURG, WEST VA.
(uacac '/itf.
1858,
I^73>
j.G. BLACKFORD,
Forwarding and Commission
Pork-packcr. anil cnrcr of the celebrated
brands ol Maryland Sugar Cured Hums, and
Shoulders and lireakfast Uacon.
Staple and Fancy Groceries, Provisions. Liq- j
uors. Argosy and othei choice brands of Hour ]
Apent for Ponieroy Salt Co. Pomerov Iron j
Co's. Nails. Louisville J.ime anil Cement, I
Xenia Powder Co. Arc. tVc.
Ann Slrxet, above Court, Parkerslmnf, (
MERCHANT.
? jjeallk in?
\V?brt Va.
mav6-6ni
Poetry.
Republished by Request.
THE CHRISTMAS PRAYER.
A BEAUTIFUL POEM OF CHRISTMAS EVE.
'Twas the eve before Christmas; "Good
night" had been said,
And Annie and Willie had crcpt into bed;
There were tears on their pillows, and tears in
their eyes,
And each little bosom was heaving with sighs,
For to-night their stem father's command had
been given
That they should retire', precisely at seven,
Instead of eight; for they troubled hnn more
With questions unheard of, than ever before;
He had told them he thought the delusion a sin.
No such person as Santa Claus ever had been,
And hoped after this he nevermore should hear
How he scrambled down chimneys with pres
ents each year.
And this was the reason that two little heads
So restlessly tossed on their soft, downy bed.
Eight, nine and the clock on the steeple tolled
ten;
Not a word had been spoken by either till then
When Willie's sad face from the blanket did
peep,
And whispered "Dear Annie, is you fast
asleep?"
"Why no, brother Willie," a sweet voice re
plies,
"I've tried all in vain, but I can't shut my eyes
For somehow it makes me so sorry because
Dear papa has said there is no 'Santa Claus.'
Now we know there is, and it can't be denied,
For he came every year before mamma died;
But then I've been thinking that she used to
pray,
And God would hear everything mamma
would say,
And perhaps she askvd Him to send Santa
Claus here
With the sack full of presents lie bought every
year." .
"Well, why tant we p'ay dest as mamma did
then,
And ask God to send him with presents aden?"
"I've been thinking so, too." And without a
word more
Four little bare feet bounded out on the floor,
And four little knees the soft carpet pressed,
And two tiny hands were clasped close to each
breast.
"Now, Willie, you know we must firmly be
lieve
That the presents we risk for we're sure to re
ceive.
You must wait iust as still till I say the 'amen,'
And by this you'll know that your turn has
come then.
Dear Jesus, look down on my brother and me.
And grant us the favor we're seeking of Thee.
I want a wax dolly, a tea-set and ring,
And an ebony work-box that sbutB with a
spring;
Bless papa, dear Jesus, and cause him to fee
That Santa Claus loves us far better than he;
Don't let him get fretful and an pry again
At dear brother Willie and Annie, Amen."
"Please Dusus, let Tanta Taus turn down to
night,
And b'ing us some p'esents before k is light*
1 want he should dive me a nice 'ittle s'od,
With bright shinin' 'unnersall painted 'ed;
A box full of tandy, a book and a toy,
Amen, and den Desus, I'll be dood boy."
Their prayers being ended they raised up their
heads,
And with hearts light and cheerful, again
sought their bed;.
They were soon lost in slumber both peaceful
and deep,
And with fairies in dream-land were roaming
in sleep.
Eight, nine, and the little French clock had
struck tcn,.<l
Ere the father had thought of his children
again;
He seems now to hear Annie's half suppress'd
sighs,
And to see the big tears stand in Willie's blue
eyes;
"I was harsh with my darlings," he mentally
said,
"And should not have sent them so early to
bed.
But then I was troubled, my feelings found
vent,
For bank stock to-day has gone down ten per
cent.
But of course they've forgot their troubles ere
this,
And that I denied them the thrice asked for
kiss;
But just lo make sure, I'll steal up to the door,
For I ne'r spoke harsh to my darlings before."
So saying, he softly ascended the stairs,
And arrived at the door to hear both of their
prayers.
His Annie's "bless papa" draws forth the big
teirs,
And Willie's grave promise falls sweet on iiis
cars.
"Strange, strange I'd forgotten," said he with
a sigh,
"How 1 longed when a child, to have Christ
mas draw nigh;
I'll atone for my harshness," he inwardly said,
"By answering their prayers ere I sleep in my
bed."
Then he turned to the stairs, and softly wen1
down,
Threw 01T velvet slippers and silk drcssi ng
gown,
Donned hat, coat and buots, and was out in
the street,
A millionaire facing the cold, driving sleet."
Nor stopped he until he had bought every
thing,
From a box full of candy to the tiny gold ring.
Indeed, he kept adding so much to his store.
That the various presents outnumbered a score.
Then homeward he turned with his holiday
load,
And with Aunt Mary's help in the nursery
'twas stowed.
Miss Dolly was seated beneath a pine tree
liy the side of a table, spread out for the ten.
A work-box well filled, in the center was laid
And on it a ring, for which Annie had prayed.
A soldier in uniform stood by a sled
With bright shining runner, and all painted
red.
There were balls, dogs and horses, books
pleasing 1? see,
An. I bird* <>f all culois were perched in the tree
Wlfile Santa Onus, laughing, stood up in the
top,
As if getting ready more presents to drop.
And as the fond father the picture surveyed.
He thought for his trouble he'd amply been paid
And he said to himself as he brushed off a tear,
'Tin happier to-night than I've been for a year;
I've enjoyed more true pleasure than ever be
fore.
Whntcarcl if hank stock fall ten per cent more?
Hcreaitcr I'll make it a rule. I believe,
To have Santa Clans visit us each Christmas
Eve."
So thinking, he gently extinguished tie light>
And tripped down the stairs to rctir? for the
night.
As soon as the beams of the bright morning son
Put the darkness to flight, and the stars, one
by one,
Four little blue eyes out of sleep opennd wide,
And at the same moment the presents espied.
Then out ol their beds they sprang with a bound
And the very gifts prayed for were all of them
found.
They laughed and they cried in their innocent
B'ee,
And shouted for "papa" to come quick and see
What presents old Santa Claus brought In the
night,
(Just the things that they wanted) and left be
fore light,
"And now," added Annie, in i voice soft and
low,
"You'll believe there's a Santa Olaus, papa, I
know."
While dear little Willie climbed up on his knee
Determined no secret between them should be,
And told in sof t whispers how Annie had said
That their blessed mamma, so long ago dead,
Used to kneel down and pray by the side of
her chair.
And that God, up in heaven, had answered
her prayer;
"Then we dot up and prayed dest as well as
we tould,
And Dod answered our prayers. Now wasn't
He dood?"
"I should say that lie was, if he sent you all
these,
And knew just what presents my children
would please.
Well, well, let him think so, the dear little elf,
'Twould be cruel to tell him I did it myself."
Blind father! Who caused your stern heart to
relent.
And the hasty word spoken so soon to repent?
'Twas the Being who oaJe you steal softly up
stairs,
And made you His agent to answer their
prayers.
OIL NEWS.
FOURTH SA>*D NEWS? rETROLIA.
The Tack & Moorhead well which
has been flowing ten days is still yield
ing about three hundred barrels daily.
The Morgan well, struck Wednes
day of last week, is making 600 bar
rels.
The Pawnee No. 1. struck Friday of
last week, is good for 500 barrels per
day.
McDonald No. 2, struck last Satur
day, resumed drilling Tuesday, with a
production of 400 barrels per day.
Ralph Bros. & Riddle No. 1 was
through the stray Tuesday last, with
fair prospects of finishing this week.
Arrangements are being made to drill
Nos. 2 and 3 to tiie fourth sand also.
Mr. Bond's well, formerly known
as the Bond & Green well, commenced
drilling to the fourth sand Tuesuay
last.
The Morrison well is drilling to the
fourth sand.
The Rodgers well, the first fourth
sand strike in the vicinity, is still pro
ducing 175 barrels per day
The Harrington well, which has
been producing 800 barrels per day, is
now doing but half this amount.
A. W. Say's well started off at a
production of 1100 barrels per day. It
is now down to 6co barrels.
Nesbit & Lardin's No. 3 is produc
ing 300 barrels daily.
Nesbit & Lardin's well on the Pat
ton farm, has settled down from i,coo
barrels to 600 barrels per day.
McDonald is drawing the tubing in
his No. 1, preparatory to drill to the
fourth sand next week.
The Jennings well is making 1,000
barrels per dav.
Nesbit & Lardin have nine wells
which they will drill to the fourth
sand.
The Jennings well, at Petrolia, has
a dangerous rival in the Hoffman &
Russell well, on the M'Climond farm
at Karns City. This well was drilled
from the third to the fourth sand, in
creasing its production from almost
nothing to fifteen hundred barrels a
day. The striking of this immense
spouter created much excitcinent in
Karns City, and hundreds of sight
seers visited the well Tuesday last, the
day it began to flow.
The old Thome well, near Buena
Vista, struck last winter, is slill pro
ducing over one hundred barrels a
day.
The Forest well, at Buena Vista, is
pumping one hundred barrels dailv. ?
The well was struck last spring,
[Independent.
A luzv editor in O'-io reads all hi*
exchanges in bed. lie finds it the
easiest wav to til I uv his sheets.
Debt and Dishonesty.
One who is anxious to discover the
causes and remedies for the prevailing
lack of honesty, traces the latter to
the credit system as well as the finan
cial calamities now upon us, A thous
and honest men are put at the mercy
of a single dishonest mart to pay his
debts. If the one pockets his money
and refuses to pay, he deprives a thous
and who are anxious to do so. The
best way to get capital, is to work for
it. Work for wages till you have mon
ey of your own. To use another's
capital, if you loSe it you must replace
it. When a man finds he owes more
than he can pay, he begins to inquire
how he can get rid of his debt. If all
he has will not pay all he owes, then
less than all, he thinks, will pay a
part, and he hides a portion, or all,
from creditors. Learn to make mon
ey a year before you spend it, then you
will buy less and buy cheaper. Other
things being equal, dishonesty prevails
in proportion to the facilities for es
caping obligations. The wise man
has said that the "borrower is a ser
vant to the lender," and he ought to
be till he returns what he has borrow
ed. When one has had the benefit of
another's labor, property, person, skill,
and all, are bound for the equivalent.
The ancient Roman and Jewish codes
held that a man's life and labor should
be bound for his debts. This may ap
pear, and sometimes is, severe; but
strict justice says, "What doth the
Lord thy God require of thee but to
do justly?" "Owe no man anything,"
if you can help it; but if you do,
place what you have at the disposal of
your creditor till it i& paid. ? [New
York Express.
We bought a new dog this spring,
but the speculation was not thorough
ly successful. The man who brought
him around turned him lose in the
yatd, and then left. When we went
out to get acquainted with him he was
engaged in exploring the slop-bucket
with his nose, and as we approached
he increlv glanced around and growled.
We attempted to pat him on the head,
and then he suddenly dropped a
mouthful of meat, and look three or
lour earnest snaps at our hand and
leg. We were afraid somebody would
steal him, so we enticed him that
evening into the kitchen with a bone,
and locked him in. tie scratched the
door and howled all night, and break
fast was late in the morning because
he wouldn't let the hired girl come In
to the kitchen. When we got him into
the yard, we found that he had upset
the bread that was rising, and had
knocked eight plates off of the dresser,
during his nocturnal skirmishes. The
next evening we felt as if we would
prefer that somebody would steal him,
and we locked him out. He amused
himself that night scratching at the
door tc get in, and howling. He can
howl more effectually than any other
dog we ever met. You would have
thought we had a menagerie in the
yard, if you could have heard him. ?
That day he killed the pet cat, belong
ing to Smith next door, and removed
a couple of mouthfuls from the leg of
Chubb's boy, who caine over info our
yard after his ball. Then he tore one
ol the sheets from the clothes-line,
and gamboled with it until it was re
duced to rags. When the ash- man
came, in the afternoon, he had a dog,
and our dog after a few sociable sniffs
organized a combat with the ash-man's
dog, and they rolled over and over a
mong our tulips and hyacinths for half
an hour, taking nips out of each other
and scattering hair about by the hand
ful. On towards evening he had a fit
on a pillow case which was bleaching
on the grass-plat; and just as we were
sitting down to tea a policeman arrived
with a warrant, sworn out by Chubb,
for our arrest for keeping a ferocious
animal upon our premises. We went
around and paid the fine; and that
night our house waa robbed, and the
dog kept perfectly still till morning,
although we bought him for the very
purpose of scaring off burglars. Any
body who wants to buy a dog, may
have ours cheap. We will sell him at
a sacrifice.
We arc told of a farmer of Auglaize
county, who, when ahout to pass that
narrow strip that divides the heavenly
land from ours, was asked if he
wouldn't have a certain one present
to pray for him. "So, sir," replied
the dying man; "I am a dyed-in-the
wool granger, and want no mid. Ho
man between me and my Maker."

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