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The Volcano lubricator. (Volcano, W. Va.) 1871-1879, January 13, 1874, Image 1

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THE VOLCANO LUBRICATOR.
THE CRGAN OF THE WEST VIRGINIA OIL PRODUCERS. . GEORGE P. SARGENT, PUBLISHER A PROFRIETOH
VOL 3. VOLCANO, WEST VA., TUESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1874. NO. 31.
Volcano Lubricator.
Published every Tuesday
?BY?
GEORGE P. SARGENT.
Office: No. S, Raymond street.
Subscription Rates:
One year, invariably in advance, $2.00.
Six months " ' " " 1.2?.
Adrrrtisi it <j Hates :
One Square, one insertion, 5 2.00
Each additional 41 1. 00
One Square one year. 25.00
?' " six months, 15.00
" u three months 10.00
One Fourth Column one year, 40.00
" " six months, 30.00
?? " three months,, 20.00
One Hall" Column one year, 70.00
?' " six months, 60.00
?? u three months, 50.00
One Column one year, 140.00
" " ?iix months. 90.00
" " three months, 70.00
l ocal notices 20 cents per line.
No notice inserted tor less than one dollar.
All ysarly advertisers pay quarterly in ad
*nc.>.
Pa rkersbu va Advertise men ts.
fO UN A. HCTCH1NSON. JK. DAVE D. JOHNSON.
//t/TCHINSON & JOHNSON,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law ,
Court Square. PAKKERSBURH, \\\ V.
6WANN HOUSE. ? B. Gilbert,
Proprietor, Parkersburg, W. Va. This isthe
only first-class Hotel in Parkersburg. It is
fitted up with all the modern improvements.
Pure soft water is constantly supplied from
Ohio River, and is lighted "with pas and
heated with steam. Strict attention given
to guests. It is head-quarters for oil men
'71? tf.
?yrpi. H. BUSH,
MERCHANT TAILOR.
Court Street, PARKERcBURG. WEST VA'
Always keeps on hand a larjje and well se
lected stock of the best of Cloths, Cassimers !
Vestines, &c. Suiis made to order and upon
the shortestnoce. All work warranted. A
a large spplyof Gent's Furnishing Goods al
ways ou hand augV7t-iY?
J. R. MEHEN,
X
DEALER IS
vjroceries, Produce,
And a full supply of fresh fish and
oysters always on hand.
Market street, next to Market House,
Parkersburg, W. Va. mav27*4t.
jpDWARD BRAIDON.
PIOyEER
TOBACCO WORKS
PARKERSBURG, WEST VA.
^y .M. OILS,
<? 'en. Fire , Marivc Life Insurance
Agent.
Represents the following well known and
?popular Insurance Companies.
-Continental Ins. Co., of New York
(Cash Assetts over $2,000,000.)
Home Ins. Co., of Columbus, Ohio.
? (Cash Assetts over $870,000.)
New York Life Ins. Co. New York,
Cash Assetts $jo,ooo,coo; an*l income $$,000,
???'.
Office on Market street, above Court Square,
I'arsburg, W Va.
uarysi, 1
jpURNITURE WARE ROOMS
?OF?
D. SCH/EFER,
Aun St., Parkersburg .
BEDSTEADS, SETTEES,
< SAFES. SOFAS.
WARDROBES. .BUREAUS,
ROCKING-CHAIRS. EASY-CHAIRS.
WRITING-DESKS, IMPROVED BI.INDS,
LOUNGES, CHAIRS,
PICTURE-FRAMES.
PARLOR FURNITURE,
MIRRORS OF ALL SIZES, &e.,
And erery variety of articles usually kept
iu a first class furniture store, manufactured
and imported. All articles bought st this
store are warranted to be as represented when
urchased. Any article manufactured on tie
shortest netice. aprso'ji -6m
-pus SPACE
IS PAID FOR
BY THE
WEST VA.
OIL & OIL LAND
COMPANY,
Who are engaged so constant
ly in
SHIPPING OIL
That they have not time to prepme
An advertisement this week.
Address,
Petroleum, WestVa.
Parkersburg Advertisements.
Hp HE PLACeTtO GET
THE CHEAPEST AND BEST
Groceries, Provisions, Grain and Pro ?
dnee, is at
MARTIN & GILBERT'S,
Market street, Parkershurg, W. Va
?yHOMPSON & JACKSOJ^
Wholesale Grocers and Liquor
Dealers,
General Forwarding and Commission
M E R C H A N T^
Coi ner of Ann and Kanawha Streets,
Parkersburg W. Va.
Wc will forward all poods to Volcano
promptly and in good condition from all points.
We refer to Thomas Schilling & Co., the
O'Brien Bros, and others. All goods consigned
to our care will be forwarded without making
it neccssary for the parties ordering, corres
ponding with us.
J. H. Stribling,
DEALER IN
HATS , CAPS , BOOTS AND
SHOES. AND GENTS FURNISHING
Goods, Court Square, Parkersburg.
West Va, april 20 iy.
J W. HITESHEW
Commission Merchant
?A?H Csalcr in?
Flox Grain, Baled Hay , etc.
Ground Feeds and Com Meal ? Spec
ialty.
ANN STREET,
PARKERSBURG, WEST VA.
Mayu'jitt.
jDURCHE & BUTCHER,
DEALERS IX
Hardware, Iron, Steel,
Xaikf Xuts, Bolts, Etc.
Blacksmiths', Carpenters' and Coop
ers' Tools.
Belting and Packing,
Fire Brick and Clay.
Drill Ropes. Sand pump Ropes, and
all kinds of cordage ? including
WIRE ROPE,
all sizes.
Bungs, Tank iron. Rivets ana all that
is necessary for the Oil Trade, also
a full stock of
WOODEN WARE;
And the celebrated cutlery of Rogers'
Wostenholm's, pocket and table.
Also Drain Pipes suitable for chim
neys.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR
STOCK.
Court street, opp. 2d Nat. Bank,
Parkersuurg, W. Va.
TUBRICATING OILS
L. D. KRAFT & CO.
PRODUCERS AND DEALERS IN
WEST VIRGINIA
NATURAL LUBRI
CATING OILS.
Sole Proprietors of the Well Known
Ad Irens L. D. KRAFT & Co.
Parkwsbury.
jP a rke rsb u rg A il vertisem en ts.
Fall & winter i873
S. NEWBERGER,
Court St., Parkcrsburg, West Va.
Just returned from the Eastern citics with
the most complete assortment of
DRY GOODS,
FANCY GOODS,
NOTIONS
EVER EXHIBITED IN THIS CITY,
And he very respectfully invites the citizcns
of Volcano and vicinity to call and exairire
his stock. An entire new stock of
CARPETS,
OIL CLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
RUGS,
WINDOW BLINDS, BLANKETS,
COMFORTS
AND
BED SPREADS.
Orders received from Volcano will receive
carefully attention, and prices guaranteed.
When vou come to Parkersburg do not tail to
call and examine my goods.
REMEMBER THE PL A CE ! !
SAM'L. NEWBERGE
Parkersburg, West Va.
^OVELTY FOUNDRY
? AND ?
Machine Works.
JOHX COOK ,
MachinistI Blacksmith
Engines, Saw Mills, Stave Machines,
etc., generally on hand.
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, and all
kinds of Machinery, made to
order on short notice.
HEAVY & LIGHT CASTINGS,
HEATING STOVES, & c.
Oil Well Tools
of best brand of Iron.
Prompt attention paid to Repairs.
Kanawha St , bet. Market and yuliana
Streets ,
PARKERSBURG, W. VA.
SAufr73tf
"jTIIE MAMMOTH
NEW FURNITURE
WARE-ROOMS
\V. H.WARNE& CO
Market St., Parkersburg ,
(OH place, below Market House) is now open.
Those who are desirous of purchasing
Superior Furniture
? at ?
Reasonable Prices
Crtnnot do better than examine the work at
this establishment, before making their
selections.
Inquiries by mail promptly -.inswered.
Their Stock is complete, comprised in part of
Marble and Wood Top
C^TTables and Stands,
J3T*Ladies' Gentlemen's
CS^" Writing Desks,
SS^Lotzs Patent Spring Bed Lounge,
?3?*" Wardrobes and Bookcases,
4?r*Camp and Easy Chairs,
C?T*Bureaus and Sideboards.
Refrigerators
?3?" Window Shades.
?ALL KINDS OF?
COFFINS
Constantly on hand.
> We n?? prepared to manufacture to ordei
anything in our line, in the very best style.
We have none but first-class workmen, and
all responsible orders from Volcano and vi
cinity, will be promptlv filled, aBd goods
warranted as represented.
Remember the place,
PARKERSBURG, WEST VA.
|une2o'"itf.
i8S8,
i873>
J.G. BLACKFORD,
Forwarding and Commission
MERCHANT .
Pork-packer, and curcr of the celebrated
btands ol' Maryland Sugar Cured Iluins, and
Shoulders and oreakfast Hacon.
Stnple and Fancy Groceries, Provisions. Liq
uors, Ar^o- v an'd othet choice brands of Hour
Apent for Pomcroy Salt Co. Pomeroy Iron
Co's. Nails. Louisville Lime and Cement,
Xenia Powder Co. Ate. ic.
Ann Str?et, above Court, Parkershurg,
? DKALF.H I.N?
We?t V*.
iix*vt>? ton
Poetry.
The Old Straw Chair.
Tunte? Old Arm Chair.
I lore my tobacco, and who shall dare
Prevent tne from smoking to soothe my care?
I've cherished it long as a relished prize,
And puffed it away in clouds to the skies.
The pipe from my lips shall never depart
While life's streaming blood flows through
my heart.
Who taught mcto smoke with such fond care
But my grandpapa in his old straw chair?
In boyhood's age, whenever I would see
The old man take his whiff, I would get on
on his knee,
And handle his pipe, make him laagh and joke,
Then ask him with a smile to allow me to
smoke.
"Now, David," he would say, -'take only one
puff;
To a youth of your age it is quite chough."
lie would watch me draw it with a fondly
look ?
If I coughed he would laugh till the old chair
shook.
I'v played around his ehair on many a night,
Watch 'd the smoke from his pipe in clouds
take its flight;
Compelled by the charm of that beautiful
thing.
My thrilling voice the kitchen would ring,
lie would hand me the pipe, and mother would
cry,
"Oh, father, do not! for you'll ruin the boy."
But such was his joy he was deaf to her care'
Enveloped in smoke in his old straw chair,
The old man got helpless? compelled to depart
From the blessings of life, which once glad
dened his heart,
On his death bed the lesson he taught
Was, that indolent habits with dangers were
fraught.
But I shall his memory revere to the last,
For his will told a tale of times that had pass
ed}*
The whole of his wealth he bequeathed to my
care,
With his silvered mounted pipe and hin old
straw chair.
FAMILIAR WORDS AND
'PHRASES.
Where they Start? How they Start
?Who Starts Them? What they
Mean.
From Hearth and Home.
"I "have here only made a nosegay
of culled flowers and have brought
nothing of my own hut the string that
ties them." ? [Montaigne.
Lord Lvtton somewhere says that
after Shakspeare, Horace has given us
more quotations, so generally in use
as to become proverbial, than any
other author.
Tcrence, Plautus, Virgil, Ovid, and
the celebrated Greek poet Menander,
have added much to swell our list of
proverbs, while the works of our own
Franklin are a rich storehouse of such
experiences.
Do we all know when we sagely re
mark, as we so frequently do, "There's
many a slip 'twixt the cup and the
lip," that wc are giving a literal trans
lation of an old hexemeter; and when
we resignedly speak of ?smiling through
our tears,' little as we suspect it, we
are quoting Homer.
That musty old proverb of Frank
lin's, "Early to bed and early to rise,"
etc., has been the bane of my exist
ence. Many a delightful fairy story
and equally wonderful morning dream
has been broken in upon suddenly and
irremediably by the voice of father or
mother saying, ''Now, child, remem
ber the proverb, "Early to bed and
early to rise." The proverb, however
ungraciously, has been obeyed; but
alas! for Ihe health, wealth and wis
dom so lavishly promised. My eyes
are worn out with use before dawn,
the wisodm which, had they had prop
er rest, I might have obtained, is non
est , while my wealth may be estimated
by the price thir, article will bring! ?
"God helps them that help themselves,"
is from the same hand, and bears an
independent, cnergetic spirit, strangly
at varience with the sluggardly coun
sel to spend the long winter evening,
so full of golden opportunities for
gaining knowledge, in idle slumber. ?
Give this idea about sleeping early and
rising early to the winds. More harm
is done the eves by two hours' use be
fore breakfast than could possibly be
fa'l them during the rest of the dav.
"Never put off till to-morrow what
can be done to-day," is also Franklin's
and one cannot make a greater mis
take than by following this proverb,
unless indeed he be an inveterate pro
crastinator. But for a sane man de
liberately to cut himself off from that
increase of knowledge or change of
circumstanccs which the next daymay
bring forth is simply silly. Far rather
would I choose as mine the rendering
which Mark Twain has put upon this
proverb, ' Never do to-day what can
be put off till to-morrow."
Rabelais has giver s many common
expressions, such as " Robbing Peter
to pay Paul," "And lie thought the
moon was made of green cheese."
The familiar adage, "'Evil commu
nications corrupt good manners," was
ejeoted by St. Paul, and is found in a
fragment of one of the comic poems
of Menander.
Many of the trftest and seemingly
most national Scotch and English pro
verbs have been borrowed from the
East, and even the famous old saw,
"To carry the coals to Newcastle,"
has a prototype, not only in the Per
sian saying, "To carry the pepper to
Ilindostan," but also in the Hebrewi
"To carry oil to the city of Olives."
Frasmus defines a proverb as being
"A well-known saying remarkable for
some elegant novelty." Cervantes
says it is "A short sentence drawn
from long experience," and Lord John
Russell declares it to be "The wit of
one and the wisdom of many," while
i Howell describes the ingredients of a
j good proverb to be "Sense, shortness,
! and salt."
It is believed that Spain carries off
the palm in point of originality and
elegance, as she certainly must in num
! ber, a< one person has made a collec
tion of twentv-lour thousand, and Re
pulics has since published six volumes
of proverbs!
The common expression, "Mind
your p's and q's" had its origin in t'ue
ale-houses in the olden time, when it
was customary to keep each man's ac
count upon the wall or door. At the
head of the bill would be the initials
P and Q^, which stood for pints and
quarts, and as the numbers mounted
up we can imagine one kindly rustic
saying to another, "Mind your p's and
q's man; mind your p's and q's."
The origin of the phrase, "A feath
er in one's cap," is accounted for in
the Lansdownc manuscript in the
British Museum. Mere m ay be found
a description of Hungary in 1299, in
which the writer says of the inhabit
ants: "It hath been an ancient custom
among them that none should wear a
feather but he who had killed a Turk,
to whom yt was lawful to shew the
number of his slaine enem> 's by the
number of fethers in his cappe."
Mow frequently we see a child jump
from a retreat and shriek "Boo!" at his
frightened little plavmates. The word
is a corruption of Boh, the son of O
din, so fierce a general among the
Goths that the mere mention of his
name spread a panic during his life
time, and stranger still, has continued
to do so ever since.
The word bank is derived from ban
co , a bench. These benches were erec ?
ted in the market-places, and there
the exchange in money took place ?
The fir*t public bank was established
by Jews in Venice, in the year 1550.
The word skedaddle, the writer had
always supposed to be slang of the
worst type. An article, however, up
on the word says that it may be readi
ly traced to a Greek origin, anu that
Thucydides and Herodotus frequently
used the word in speaking of a routed
army.
The Swedes and Danes have a sim
ilar word bearing the same significa
tion. An old version of the Irish New
Testament contains the passage: "I
will smite the shepherd, and the sheep
shall be sjredad or 1 (all scattered.) ?
This word was probably used by some
Irishman at Bull Run, and, being very
expressive, was soon taken up by
everyone.
The expression "Getting into a
Scrape," has its origin in Scotland. ?
Upon the seashore in that country the
game of "golf is much plaved, some
what resembling croquet or billiards,
being played with balls and mallets. ?
The hole which the rabbit makes is
there called a "scrape," and as rabbits
arc many in number, burrows or
scrapcs abound, and balls frequently
fall into them, when the players call
out, "You are in a scrape!" As, of
course, getting in a scrape ruined that '
stroke, it was considered an unpleas
ant position to be in, and since we ,
have applied the. phrase to all dilem
nas.
"It will.be done before ou can say
lack Robinson!" Such remarks we
frequently hear, and one authority
says that the individual so frequently
mentioned is one Mr. John Robinson
who lived in Westmoreland, and who
in a remarkably short time rose from <
obscurity to wealth qnd power, becom
ing a member of Parliament and Sec- <
retar> of the Treasury, besides hold
ing other important positions. Grose
says the expression originated from a <
very volatile gentleman bearing his 1
name, who would call upon his neigh
bors and begone before- his name was
announced. A Ihird aatboritj claims
the following- lines, taken from an old
play, are the original ones:
"A wor!te h ys a* cssic to be doone
As ty? to taTe-Jaeke: roirj-son."
The word arena has a most interest
ing little bit of Roman history done
up in its small compass. The rrord is
from the Latin and mean? sand. But
to the student's eye it means a great
deal more. He sees the Roman a m
pitheatre crowded to its utmost with
the beautiful women and brave men of
that renowned city. Within the circle
two gladiators fight, they 6trive for
liberty, but alas! how vainly. Each
one at the same moment gives the fa
tal blow, and each one lies weltering
in his blood. The people shout, the
ladies clap their dainty jeweled fin
gers, and the attendants coming in,
drag out the dead bodies and strew the
ground with fresh sand that the new
combatants may not slip in the blood
of their predecessors. When most of
us speak now of the arena of life, for
instance, we think of the earth as the
battle-field and men struggling for
right or for wrong; but the first mean
ing of the word has slipped away from
us entirely.
The word porcclatn means in bpan
ish little pig. What possible connec
tion can there be between the beauti
ful china-ware which glitters in our
shop-windows and the little pigs roll
ing in the gutter? In 1518 the Portu
guese effected their settlement at Ma
cao, and through them the first speci
mens of porcelain were imported into
Europe. They had applied the. term
porcellana to the cowrie shells, which
represented original money, becausc
of their resemblance to the pink backs
of little pigs. Afterwards as the
transparent and beautiful china-ware
resembled the delicate cowrie shell, it
was called by the same name.
I will close this article by giving the
origin of tne word quiz, which I find
to be as follows: A theatrical mana
ger in Dublin at a dinner-party with
some friends, when the conversation
turned upon the subject of words, bet
a basket of champagne that he could
then and there coin a word which wo'd
be in the mouth of everybody in the
city the next day. The bet being ta
ken, the party dispersed. The mana
ger called his errand boys and runners,
gave them pieces of chalk, and told
them to write the word "quiz" on eve
ry shutter, door, and fence they could
find in the place. It was done, and as
a matter of course the new word was
in everybody's mouth, the next day,
and ha* won a good and legitimate
standing. M.
Something like an Apology.
The editor of a western paper oncc
gave a noticc of a ball, and happened
incidently to mention that the dancing
of Major Heeler's better half was like
"the cavorting of a fly-bitten cow in a
field of cucumbers." The fact that the
editor had not been invited to the ball
may somewhat detract from the value
of the simile, while at the same time
it accounts for his establishing the fi
gure. The major, accompanied by
his better half and a six shooter, call
ed on the editor to complain of the
poetical nature of the image. On
learning that the lady was the one he
had described, the editor besought her
to raipe her veil. She did so. saying:
"Now sir, I expcct you to apolo
gize."
"Apologize! I should rather think
I would," was the answer, as he seized
his hat and rapidly left the room.
Tne astonished major rushed to the
window. "Stop, you sir! you have not
apologized!"
" What do you mean?" shouted the
major, accenting the interrogation with
a pistol shot.
The answer was wafted back from
round the next corner?
"Can't you see I'm looking for that
cow?"
A sharp Hartford girl, with an eye
to Christinas presents, attended both
a Baptist and Episcopalian Sunday
school, and all went well until she
gave several answers out of her Bap
tist lesson book to questions in the
Catechism, and the churchmen drop
ped her.
It is'nt wortu wliiie, unJer all eir? ?
cumstanc.cs, to express \'Our sentiment#
freely, unless you hanker after martyr
dom. While Lydia Thomson was ca
pering in a Memphis theatre the other
night, a fellow in the audience shout
ed: "Bully for you, old tow .topi
Good Lordy, look at her kick!" They
nut him out.

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