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Wheeling register. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1878-1935, October 29, 1892, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092518/1892-10-29/ed-1/seq-8/

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And we have an assortment that beats all previous lines fcr Qual
ity, Style and Price. We can please you in anything from a Gray
Ironing Blanket to the Finest California Blanket in white, red, col
ored border and fancy.
COMFORTS AND QUILTS cheaper than you can quilt them at
home, and the best grades of Cotton and Oil Boiled Calico.
JUST RECIEVED A NEW LOT OF MILITARY AND SHORT
In Seal, Japanses Seal, Wool Seal, Beaver, Astrachan and Monkey; alio
SEAL SKIN JACKETS.
As the prices of Fine Furs are going up, persons contemplating the pur
chase of these goods should do so now and save money.
WRAPS S
Ladies’, Misses’ and Children's garments are being received every day
and our stock already is larger than any in the city, and with these daily ad
ditions we have the best assortment and always the latest style.
Get our prices before you purchase.
G 0. EM* CO.
1168 MAIN STRBKT.
UNDERWEAR BARGAINS I
To-day we offer about 35 dozen odds and
ends of Ladies’, Gent’s and Children’s Un
derwear, about one-half regular price.
RED MIXED WOOL.
, Gent’s Extra Heavy Underwear at 59c. regular price $1.00.
Ladies’ Camel's Hair Underwear at 39c, former price 75c.
CHILDREN’S GREY MIXED UNDERWEAR.
Size 16 at 9c, regu’ar price. 18c. Size 22 at 21c. regular price, 33c.
Size 18 at 14c, regular price, 22c. Size 24 at 23c, regular price, 35c.
Size 20 at 17e, regular price, 25c. Size 26 at 26c, regular price, 40c.
Shirt Bargains For This Week!
50c for Men’s Jersey Winter Shirts.
50c for Men's Cassimere Winter
Shirts.
75c for Embroidered Buckskin Shirts.
$1.00 fod Extra Heavy Blue Flannel
Shirts.
$1.00 for Fine Tricot Flannel Shirts.
$1.00 for Our Finest Buckskin Shirts.
$1.00 for Our Finest Jersey Shirts.
$1.25 for Fino Flannel Evening
Shirts.
35c for Boys’ Heavy Jersey Shirts.
50c for Boys’ Heavy Cloth Shirts.
SEE OUR BARGAINS IN WINTER
UNDERWEAR.
■M’FADBEN’S HAT & SHIRT STORE,
' Cheapest Store in Wheeling. 1320 and 1322 Market Street.
far Store Open Every Evening.
DR. GEO. J. C ADDLE,
SURGEON DENTIST,
»0. mi aAlUX IXUIT,
Over Dellar Saving* Baat lyfcaad
I^IttchinUtA&ilron iUorker*
J^EDMAN-t& bp.,
. GtfcERAL MACHINISTS
^AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Mariae and Stationary Engines.
3p21c WHEELING. W, VA.
ESTABLISHED 1874.
tOQUARTERS FOR OYSTERS I
THE OLD RELIABLE.
. O. McCLUSKEY,
-SHIPPER OF
riMORE, NORFOLK ASD IEVY0RE
Oysters I
3S Paila and Shell every day in the year.
I cater to the trade who want Good Oya
ily. and in Quality and Price challenge
•on.
*6 Twelfth 3t, Wheel!nf, W. Va.
dab_
' sitfiv? Cards
—and
dding \miw
In the lateet ®*J'1**
nea of « ,
ner* ^
1 nsriuomeicr nacoru.
Mr. C. Schaepf, the Opera House drug
gist, made the following observations of
the temperature yesterday: 7 a. ra., 45;
I 9 a. m., 50; 12 m . 56; i p. m., 61; 7 p. m.,
57. Weather, fair.
Index to Mew Advertisements,
POCRTH PAGB.
Natural Stone Kilters—Ewing Bros.
PITFH PA8I.
Religious Notice—First Presbyterian Church.
Wanted—Salesman
Wanted—Mil Shippers.
Religious Notice—M. Matthew’s Church
\dJourned ba.e of Real Estate—W. B. Simp
son.
Attention. Young Men's Democratic Club.
Mince Meat—Albert Stolze A Co.
List of Letters.
Try List’s Cough Syrup-R. H. List.
SIXTH PAOS.
Underwear Bargains—Stone A Thomas.
Caramels.—To-day will be a special
day on Caramels. Many new kinds will
be displayed. Geo. L. Durst.
4 Greet Bargain-.
Women’s fine Dongola Button Shoes,
$1.25, worth $2.00.
Women’s good sewed Button Shoes,
95c, worth $1.25.
Men’s flue calf Seamless Shoes, $1.75,
worth $2.50.
Men’s good solid Seamless Shoes,
$1.15, worth $1.50.
am Shoe Store.
aroel* to-day.
xEO. L. Durst.
are offer^.g a
*ve dol
THE PRISONERS WILL NOT BE TRANSFERRED
TO THE NEW JAIL, MONDAY.
The Building Nearly Completed, But Not Quite.
The Reason For the Delay—A Glance
Through the Edifice.
The Board of County Commissioners
has rescinded its action, taken at the
last regular meeting, designating next
Monday as the date for the transfer of
the prisoners from the old to the new
jail, and the date has been left open,
making it probable that at least two
weeks, and perhaps some days longer,
will elapse before the change Is made.
This action was made necessary by the
fact that the building could not be com
pletely fitted up in time. This Is not
the fault of the contractors, nor
of the architect, nor even of
the Board itself. It doesn’t
appear to be any one’s fault. At the
time the order was made designating
the last day of October as the date of
removal it was thought by all connected
with the construction of the edifice
that there would be nodifficulty In hav
ing all the details completed, but some
additional work was determined upon In
the meantime, and there was a delay in
fitting up the cells, especially iu the
matter of bunks, which made it, if
not impossible, at least inconvenient
to transfer the prisoners on the
day named. The sample of
bunks submitted by the Van Dorn
iron works did not meet the approval of
the Board, and others had to bo made.
These have not been completed, and it
:s a little uncertain when they will bo
received. Some miner fixtures in the
nlsn rAmfiin to hfi I’laced ill DOSi
tion, but they are matters of small mo
meat, and will take but little time.
Yesterday evening seventy-live of the
eighty cells In the main cell building
were ready for the bunks, and the oth
ers will doubtless be completed lo-day.
The ventilating apparatus is working
nicely, making the interior of the build
ing warm, and drying it out nicely, but
some of the plastering is a little greeu
as yet, aud there will be a noticeable
dampness for several weeks.
Tne jailer’s residence is complete, and
can bo moved Into at once, If it was de
sirable. It Is a fine building, contain
ing, besides the kitchen, which Is fitted
up with a massive steel range and all
conveniences, three large rooms and a
hall on the first floor and three bed
chambers and a bath room, besides halls
and several closets on the second, aud
will make a commodious and pleasant
residence. It is entirely cut off from the
jail proper, save by one door-way, open
ing into the guard room, and this open
ing Is closed by a massive steel door.
Tbe front building, devoted to vari
ous offices on the first and second floors,
is still in a rather chaotic condition,
the plasterers and plumbers not hav
ing quite* finished their work, and the
mantels remaining to go up.
In the basement of thi9 building,
down in a region which Is as dark as
the interior of the proverbial cow, the
padded cells for violent lunatics are
complete, as are the dungeons for re
fractory prisoners, who may need to be
shut up there to ruminate ubon the
error of their ways. The padded cells
aro lined with the stoutest duck, tightly
stuffed with excelsior, walls and floors
aline, and a man can bounce himself
about in them like a rubber ball, with
out Jarring hi9 constitution very seri
ously. The dungeons have a door at
each end, so that a man who refuses to
behave himself can be attacked front
and rear by those having him In charge.
The large room In the basement of
the tower, designed for the
detention of witnesses under
certain circumstances, Is also complete,
as Is the laundry, aud up next the roof
the department for female prisoners
and the hospital is in good shape, and
will be ready in time. The hath room
for the prlsouers, In the basement of
the cell building, has been fitted up
with three tubs and plenty of cold wa
ter, and is ready to commence opera
tions. In all there are five bath tubs
about the building, and cleanliness is
one of tbe things which will be insisted
upon.
The whole outfit Is one entirely cred
itable to the couuty, the contractor, the
architect, and the Board, and when the
public is admitted for an inspection of
the building there will, no doubt, be a
general concurrence in this view.
EDUCATIONAL DOINGS.
What Has Transpired In a General Way
Auioug the Schools.
After a week’s enjoyment among the
scholars in preparing for the “Colum
hinn Ttav eeli'hratinn.” thev found it
| somewhat difficult to get down to hard
I work agaiu. The work being doubly
hard on account of the entire week
being devoted to the first of the bi
monthly written examinations of this
term. The examinations wero about
all completed yesterday. The reports
will be sent to the parents on Monday,
the last day of the month. Throughout
all the schools the toachers have noted
marked improvement in various grades |
over that of last year. This is certainly
a good showing for the first term of
school.
In some of the schools work for the
World’s Fair has already been com
menced. The teachers should read with
care State Superintendent B. S. Mor
gan’s editorial in the October number of
the West Virginia School Journal, in
which he says:
“The character of our State educa
tional exhibit will depend very largely
upon the promptness and readiness
with which the teachers, superintend
ents and scholars respond to the re
quests of the World’s Fair managers.
This work has been begun a little late,
and the teachers and scholars must
therefore begin the work of preparation
promptly and push it vigorously. Many
of the older States issued their circulars
of lnstructious to teachers relative to
this work as early as last March.”
The schools in the city here not hav
ing commenced their preparation should
commence at once, as over half of the
work could be &:complished before
Christmas. We are all naturally Inter
ested In toe schools and want our State
to have an educational display that will
be on a par with any other State in the
Union. i
The grammar department teachers of
the city met at Superintendent Ander
son’s office on Thursday afternoon.
The teachers of Washington school
meet every Friday afternoon in the
principal’s office, and review the
studies in which they are to be exam
ined at the end of the school year.
The A and B divisions of Webster
school held a meeting on Thursday.
Prof. Anderson gave a talk on “Cases
of nouns and properties of adjectives.” /
The same divisions of Centre school
were addressed by the Superintendent .
Friday morning.
The banner carried by the scholars
---
I I
V
from Washington school on ‘‘Colombian
Day” was purchased by the pupils
themselves for the occasion.
Miss Ella Vieth, of Washington
school, visited the Pittsburg schools
l&st W66ki
The Garland, a paper published by
the Longfellow Literary Society of
Ritchie school, iaone of the leading
Friday afternoon literary attractions.
Visitors frequently call to hear this
bright, newsy journal read.
Thi9 year Lincoln school will have
but three Seniors. The Junior Class
numbers seven.
Miss Carrie Kindleberger, one of the
honor pupils of the class of '92, has been
appointed as substitute In Washington
school.
THE NEWS OF THE DAY.
Attention, Committees.
The Entertainment Committee and De
monstration Committee are requested to
meet the Executive Committee at nine
o’clock this morning atclub rooms. Im
portant business; be present promptly.
John Waterhouse, Secretary.
Barry B. Soy bold Pardoned.
Yesterday morning Mrs. H. B. Sey
bold received a telegram from Jas. W.
Ewing, private secretary to the Gov
ernor, stating that the Governor had
pardoned her husband, Harry B. Sey
bold, who has been confined in the pen
itentiary at Moundsville over eighteen
months.
A Baey session.
The Board of County Commissioners
met yesterday morning as a Board of
Equalization and Appeals, and put in
a busy day considering petitions
and listening to the explana
tions of property owners. About fifty
petitions were before the Board, and
quite a number were deferred, varying
action being taken on the others.
A Trick that Didn't Work.
Yesterday G. If. McCune, who has
been boarding with Mrs. Parsons, gave
that lady an order for $5.25, for board,
on Jos. McDauu, and then skipped
around and collected his wages before
the order was presented, intending to
go to Pennsylvania. The police were
notified and McCune was arrested and
locked up. After considering the mat
ter in the solitude of his cell, he agreed
to pay up, and was released.
A Large Batch of Prisoners.
Nine prisoners were landed behind
the bars at Moundsville, yesterday, by
Sheriff R. H. Boone, of Fayette county.
Five of the prisoners were white and
four colored, and they were in charge
of Deputies Jas. L. Storer, I. Storer,
J. A. Boone, Clark Humphries, Walter
Blum, C. Z. DeQuinsy, Alex. McNabb,
\V. B. McDowell and Harrison Ash.
One of the prisoners got ten years for
murder, one fifteen years for an unlaw
ful assault on his own daughter, one
two years for stabbiug a mau, aud the
others varying terms for robbery.
A Bad Runaway.
Last night about Lalf-pastsix a team
belonging to Albert Jennings took
fright in the Fifth ward, and came
dashing across the Market street bridge
and up to Sixteenth street. At that
street it swerved to the east and the
wagon struck the B. & 0. safety gate,
completely wrecking it, and knocking
the tongue off the wagon and complete
ly wrecking the vehicle. This checked
the career of the ,tightened horses and,
they were captured. No one was hurt,
although a pedestrian on the postofiice
sidewalk had rather a narrow escape.
Chautauqua Local Board.
Rev. W. J. Edwards, of Jamestown,
N. Y., was In the city on Thursday in
the interest of Chautauqua, and after
consultation with a few frieuds of edu
cation, appointed the following commit
tee, to be known as the Chautauqua
Local Board, to whom persons desiring
information as to Chautauqua or the C.
L. S. C. course cau apply: Rev. A. B.
Rlker, D. I)., Rev. D. A. Cunningham,
D. D., Rev. J. A. Fullerton, D. D., Rev.
J. 1L Hess, Dr. Hattie Jones, Prof. C.
U. Anderson, Prof. J. N. Hammond,
Mr. J. C. Lynch, Miss Anna Reaves,
Mrs. Elmore Chapman, Mr. M. F.
Glesey.
Death of John A. Hervey.
Telegrams received In this city yes
terday afternoon announced the death
yesterday morning of Mr. John A. Her
vey, eldest son of Mrs. Letitia Hervey,
of the Island, and brother of Mrs. An
drew Patterson. Mr. Hervey was well
known in this community, and his ge
nial manner and bright wit will be re
membered by many, who will regret to
hear the sad news of bis untimely
death. Mr. Hervey left this city lu the
early part of the Hayes administration
to go to Washington, D. C., as a pro
tegee of Mr. James G. Blaine, whose in
fluence placed him In a prominent posi
tion in the State Department, where he
remained uutil the change from Repub
lican to Democratic rule made it neces
sary to resign his position. Bloce then
Mr. Hervey has been engaged actively
in the interest of theStandard Oil Com
pany at Toledo and Findlay, Ohio.
Departure of Prof Wingert,
Prof. H. S. Wlngert, physical director
of the Y. M. C. A., leaves to-day for
Philadelphia, where he has accepted a
Kittie Fox of Falrhaven, Ff.
"When my daughter Kitty was about three
years old, Eczema or Salt Rheum appeared on
her face. It itched so badly she would
Scratch till it Bled
We had seven or eight doctors, without the
least shadow of benefit. When Kitty had
taken half a bottle of
Hood’s Sarsaparilla
Sbe was better, and when she had taken 1*4
bottles she was perfectly cured and has shown
No Sign of ,Salt Rheum
For almost four years. Her skin is now as fair
and clear as any child’s in

GOING DOWN THE HILL
Old Age Creeping on Show* lUelf In Lack
Lustre Ctm and Trembling Hand*—
Many Who are Old La Tears are Vigorous
and Healthy—How Such a Condition
May be Encompassed by Ail.
How many eldarly men and women we see
who plainly show ther are “going down the
hill ” The trembling hand, th# unoerteim step,
the lack of brightness in the eye, the shrunken
features, all indicate that life is not at high
tide, that the strength and vital foroes are not
what they once were, and, in fact, that they are
going down the hilL This, of course, is to be
expected, for when one reaohes later years,
physical tronbles are sure to come, but how
many elderly people we see are healthy, happy
and comparatively vigorous. They always
seem cheerful, bright, contented. Why should
not all be equally fortunate? It certainly is
possible. Every elderly man and woman needs
to gently assist nature, all the while needs to
take some pure stimulant regularly. Every
doctor In the laud admits this, and its common
sense must be manifest to all. It should nov be
understood, however, that auy ordinary stimu
lant would be recommended. It must be some
thing pure, powerful, health-giving and
strength-imcarting. bach a stimulant can be
found only in Duffy’s Pure Malt Whiskey. It
is the only medeetnal whiskey in the market.
Its wonderful popularity is due entirely to its
power and what it has accomplished. Any el
derly man or wornau through its use may cer
tainly p eserve the health, and may reaaonab.y
expect 10 prolong the life. Do not be induced,
however, to try any Inferior article or any
which the druggist or grocer may seek to put in
its place. There is nothing wnich cau accom
plish the same object. _0)
position as Instructor in one of the
large associations of that city. Mr.
Wingert, during his stay in Wheeling,
has made many warm friends, who very
much regret his departure. As a
physical director and field trainer he
has no superior, and we are giad to say
that his abilities have been fully appre
ciated by those who havo been under
his instruction. He has been with the
association here but little over a year,
but during that time the gymnasium
classes have had au attendance un
known before.
Mr. Wingert was what the boys have
termed an "iaeai instructor, »uu tu mo
successor they have no other suggestion
than that ho follow In the footsteps of
the one whom he succeeds.
tier, Kylvanu* I.ane,
Of the Cincinnati M. E. Conference,
says: “We have for years used Hood’s
Sarsaparilla in our family of five, and
find it foully equal to ail that is claimed
for it.”
Hood’s Pills cure Liver Ills.
Special day on Caramels to-day.
Geo. L. Dukst.
Republican* at Fairmont.
On the occasion of the Republican
mass meeting at Fairmont on Saturday,
October 29th, the B. & O. R. R. will sell
tickets at Wheeling, Grafton, Clarks
burg and all Intermediate stations to
Fairmont at rate of one faro for the
round trip. Tickets wil be good going
on October 29th aud will be good for re
turn journey until October 30th.
Special day on Caramels to-day.
Geo. L. Dukst.
Caramels.—To-day will be a special
day on Caramels. Many new kinds will
be displayed. Geo. L. Durst.
THE BROOKS LICENSE LAW.
Since the enactment of the Brook* Bill our
holds, druggists aud dealers in general are
handling much better grades of liquors, partic
ularly is this the oase in tae western portion of
Pennsylvania where Kve Whiskies are best
known. The bs&t known aud most frequently
called for are Klein’s Silver Age Rye, which
sells at 11.60 per full quart, ami Klein's Du
quesne at $1.85 per full quart Recommended
by hospitals ana prescribed by physicians. Ask
your dealer for them. Send ior complete cata
logue and price list, mailed u[>on applcation, to
Max Klein, 8B Federal Street. Allegheny, Pa.
Special day on Caramels to-day.
Geo. L. Dukst.
SOUND DEMOCRACY.
Never ha* a great party, intent upon the
promotion or rlghtaud JiiHtloe, hail Letter
incentive to effort than 1* now presented
to ua. Turning our eye* to th« plain peo
pU of the land we see them burdened a*
consumer* with a tarlir »y-tem that un
justly and relentlessly demand* from
them, in the purchase of the necessaries
and comfort* of life, an amount scarcely
met by the wage* of hard and sturdy toll,
w hile the exact ions thus wrung from them
build up and increase the lortuuesof those
for whose benefit the injustice 1* perpetu
ated.
We nee the farmer listening to a delusive
story that 111U hi* mind with advantage,
while hi* pocket t* robbed by the mealthy
hand of high protection. Our working
men are atilt told the tale, oft repeated in
spite or It* demonstrated falsity, that the
existing protective tariff I* a boon to them,
and that under It* beneficent operation
ihelrwage* must increase—while a* they
listen scene* are enacted In the very abid
ing place of high protection, that mock
the hope* of toil and attent the tender mer
cy the workingman receive* from those
made *eltl*h and sordid by unjust govern
mental favors.
We oppose earnestly and stubbornly the
theory upou which our opponent* *een to
Juntify aud uphold tariff law*. — Jfr. CUV4
end's Lttteror Acceptance.
pry Q5o0fe*.
SPECIAL SALE
-OF
...
39c. A YARD.
Commencing Monday, Oc
tober 17th, we will offer 3,200
yards of Dress Goods, con
sisting of Wool Cheviots,
Plaids, Camel’s Hair, etc.,
etc., worth 50c, 60c, 65c and
75c.
CHOICE OF10T, 39c.
I respect ally inrite yoa to attend the
-ciut sal* or
BLANKETS,
* COMFORT8 AND •
WHITE BED SPREADS.
fOO Tom forts from 45c up.
tOO Pair Grey Blankets very cheap.
SCO Pair White Blankets very reasot
able.
4*0 Pair Bed Blankets eery cheap.
«ar pet*. Floor and Table Ml ' *
the lowest price.
Good Raps ror fb cents.
Please call and secsre
-1
n*t» 3>t>ertt*ement*.
FURNISH YUUR H|J
FROM OUR MAMMOTH STO~% ■
»»• FURNITURE, M
™ CARPETS M
CASH cSCO«# CaJ
AND AN]|
^ pE®n*S A FULL LINE OF ^B
H Comforts, Blankets ifl
or AND DED9INQ "■
$2.00 c ,|
Per Month. Of Every Description. v': |
WHEELING INSTALMENT COM
1136 to 1140 Market Street.
L. C. RICE, Manager.
Fits our Immense Clothing Establishment to a dot. We carry tUr.il
really first-class Hue of High-Toned Clothing In the city. We aj .**1
the world in
A collection without a peer or parallel. An assortment o! MITtl
fjeyond compare. At least do your pocketoooks the justice to 41 fl
fore you buy elsewhere.
D. GTJNDLING & C0|
STAR CLOTHIERS, 34 and :i6 Twelfth S ;t,' 1
GREAT EXCITEMENT!
Tha Greatest Sale on Record Crowds K. B.
Potts' Big Store at Main and Teuth
Streets and the Boom la in Foil Blast.
Bargains Going Like • Flash at Half
Price and Less—A Present to Every Cus
tomer who Cuts this Oat.
These big drives received daily from the New
York auction rooms will eolipse anything ever
before heard of in this section.
M EN’S 8U ITS, It .86. 18 87.13 83,14.37 and up.
V'e are leaders in low prioes. These goods
must go. Come early.
MEN’S PANTS at 4Ro, 680, 87c. *7o, 11.18 up.
Worth double or mooey refunded.
BOYS’ SUITS at Hie. 87c, *1.18, *1.37 up. Come
at once, this salt cannot last always.
HOI * PANTS. 12c. 18c. Ke, 28c, &Vj up.
These bargains are going very fast.
MEN’S KINK SHOES at 87c. Cl 10, II.*6, fl.37,
11.62 up. Look in our window for bargains in
iLoes away below the usual price.
LADIES’ FINE SHOES. 87c. 87o, 91 36 11 37.
11.46 up. All fan tellers aad will give you full
satisfaction.
CHILDREN’S SHOE* at 18c 25c, 37c,48c. flic,
72c, 87c u >. Solid bargains and fade winners.
A RACKET—LOOK AT THE PRICES
handkerchiefs, 10,S3,3c.4c.6cup. Big
value.
■ U8PENDF.R8, 6c, 8c, 12c, l&c. 18c,83c; worth
double.
MEN’S HALF HOSE, 3c, 5c, 8c, 10c up. These
prices will make you buy.
MEN’S SHIR1S, 17o, 23c. 33c. 3»c up. On
shirts we lead the trade. If weeanaot save you
at least one-half your money we do not deserve
your patronage and should not have it. and
further, you may return any goods not satisfac
tory and get your money
BIO DRIVER IN MEN’S AND BOYS’ HATS.
Don't forget us on Hats. We are here to
aveyou money.
E. BrPOTTS,
Main and Tenth Streeti,
WHEELING, W. VA.
Branch Stores—Steubenville. O.; Bellaire, O.;
New Martin’sville, W. Va., and Parkersburg,
W. Va. _
Our Store Boat, “THE CYCLONE,” Is sow
ready for business. Look out for greater bar
gains than ever. Will remain a few days only
at the principal landings along the rrver.
saSeadh
comparh
The True Test of Merit! I
Compare Our Prices!
Compare Our Quality! I
Compare Our Styles!
\V> tro making » »tr tig '• I'
age tM» Fall t,y -ar |£|
tug H
LADIES' WO MISSES' In
FIRE DRESS MM I
Of everv lemgn. OurliB* ' B
and enougEi to •-'* * '*'*
tKidy'a f*n;y «:b#hp »#•«»*
V»|ll*> •>lfBol< »t tO ^
Domical. ________ i?
THE LAPGKVr LINE Of 9
Blankets, Flannels, Itell
UNDERWEAR I
-IN THE CITY- 9
P 8.-30) pound* ebo.re Co.»,ff ^"9
1132 MAIN STRtE'^9
pAN-HANDLE
Steam Dyeing and Dry deui*^
J. HLILMfc tX. P'or1** ^ B
No lilt Mark*-’. ttr-* *' uf. ,*#9
entirely Naw Pr-«•»•* c ',utr> fl
out scouring. a 11 1& ^

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