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Wheeling register. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1878-1935, August 06, 1897, Image 4

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f^=T A- A. ZIMMERMAN,"-^ DM- ™ & Pice own
; between each ra,3. j CHAMPION OF THE WORLD, ”flut Witt I I U Ufl Ij
Index to New AdxertUemeat*.
FOURTH PAGE.
Wanted—Furnished Rooms.
You May Examine—-Geo. W. John
son’s Sons.
To Labor Organizations—vv. va.
Printing Co.
Wanted—Solicitors.
Notice to Water Consumers.
Two Drives—J. S. Rhodes & Co.
Zimmerman at the Diamond Race
Public Sale of Market Street Prop
erty.
FIFTH PAGE.
Special for Ten Days—Sheff Bros.
EIGHTH PAGE.
Krakauer Pianos—F. W. Baumer Co.
Reduced Prices on Summer Goods—
3eo. E. Stifel & Co.
Another Great Friday Sale—Stone &
Thomas.
sipdutg mjw**
CHARLES H. TANEY, Ctowral Manager^
The REGISTER, embracing its several
editions, is entered at the Postoffice at
Wheeling. W. Va.. as second-class matte J
SPECIAL NOTICE.
Persons leaving town tor the Sum
mer can have The Register delivered
by mail for fifty cents per month,
daily edition ; twenty cents per
month. Sunday edition; sixty-five
cents per month daily and Sunday
edition combined, payable in ad
vance. Call or notify publication
office either by mail or telephone >o.
007. The address will be changed
as frequently as desired. Subscri
bers should not fail to give the old
address when furnishing new ad*
dress to which paper is to be sent.
The plans for Merchants’ Day are
being carefully considered, which is
well, for it will be a big thing, and the
object is to make it a big success.
----—
Our esteemed friend. Col. Poorman,
of Bellalre. has not forgotten how to
put the plain truth effectively, as his
great audience of workingmen in
this city last evening can attest.

Although the conditions of the coal
strike are practically unchanged, the
Indefatigable work of the strike agita
'tors is telling, and while the strikers
are not gaining any brilliant victories,
they are certainly not losing ground.
-o
The American bl9hops at the Lambeth
P conference rejected the proposition of
British bishops to make the primate of
all England the head of the AngUcafl
church and all its offshoots throughout
the world. America is still independ
ent even in religion.
-——o
Three thousand men in the build'ng
and structural trades have gone on
strike in New York, in addition to
thousands of clothing workers already
on strike. It appears there are still
a few places where the prosperity
wagon hasn’t touched yet.
-o
In a letter to a constituent. Senator
Cullom. of Illinois, complains bitterly
of President McKinley’s methods of
distributing patronage. Senator Cul
lom shouldn’t blame poor McKinley
for the results of syndicate politics.
He really has very little to do with it.
-o
The District Attorney of Kings coun
ty, New York, has issued a decree
against immoral shows and swindling
games at Coney Island. The laws of
New York cover this ground, we be
lieve; and if they are of no avail what
will the decree of a petty district at
torney amount to?
-o
The Bradley-Mart ins rejoice in a
grandson who may one day be Earl of
Craven. Millions of Americans re
joice in sons and grandsons who may
be Presidents of the United States.
But folks of the Bradley-Martin stripe
rank that honor low compared to an
empty earldom.
__
Considerable interest has been stir
red up by the meeting in the interest
of the Union town. Waynesburg and
West Virginia Railroad, held at
Waynesburg Tuesday night, and sev
eral applications for stock were re
ceived. The promoters of this enter
prise would do well to turn their at
tention to the West Virginia end of
the proposed road. It will be a good
thing for both ends of the line and
the country through which it traverses
and the gentlemen who have the mat
ter in hand should pay us a visit
They doubtless would find numerous
people here willing to take an interest
in the new road and push it through,
especially if the West Virginia ter
minus shall be Wheeling.
-o
dinolevism and WOOL.
Judge William Lawrence, of Ohio, is
not only an extensive wool grower, and
a life-long Republican, but was for
five years President of the Ohio Wool
Growers’ Association and has been for
four years President of the National
Wool Growers’ Association. What he
does not know about wool and the
wool tariff and wool in Its relation, to
uolitics. probably no other man knows.
In another column will be found a
lengthy and important interview with
Judge Lawrence on the subject of the
new tariff and its relation to th§ wool
growing industry, which will be of
very great interest tp wool growers
everywhere. Life-long Republican
though the Judge iaJrnd a firm high
tariff man on principle, he can not J
stomach the new Dingley tariff as it
deals with wool, one of the prime ar
ticles. which Republicans say should
be amply protected.
In this interview Judge Lawrence
goes into the subject exhaustively and
most interestingly, and he concludes
with this statement:
“It never does any good to deny the
truth or state an untruth. I will not J
do, either. When the world’s flocks
shall be replenished, and in view of
the conditions then to exist, and the '
great decline in the world’s prices j
since the act of 1867 and the act of ,
1883, and since the McKinley act of
1890, I MUST SAY THAT THE NEW
TARIFF ACT OF AUGUST 24. 1897,
WILL BE LESS PROTECTIVE AND j
MORE RUINOUS TO THE WOOL IN
DUSTRY THAN ANY WOOL TARIFF
WE HAVE EVER HAD. THE WOOL
GROWERS ARE CHEATED IN THE
NEW TARIFF. The pledge of the
j most ample protection for wool has j
not been fulfilled.”
And why? To sum up Judge Law
rence’s exhaustive statements, because
the men who framed the Dingley bill
were actuated by motives of cupidity
and truckled to the interests with the
most money. In plain words, the wool
I growers were sold out to the big East
ern woolen manufacturers. And in
this is found the keynote to the whole j
infamous tariff measure which robs
the people for the enrichment of the
trusts. |
-o
A young woman of Yonkers, N. Y., 1
chased a thief who had robbed her
parents’ home, caught him, dragged j
him back, tied him hand and foot, re- ;
covered the stolen property from his
pockets and turned him over to the
police. Several men saw her chase and
overtake the thief and refused to help
her. What makes these cowards r.p- ;
pear even smaller is the fact that the
only person who came to her aid was
another girl. The young lady who ef
fected the thief’s capture is somewhat
of an athlete, although but “a slip of
a girl,” and stated that she was not
afraid of the thief. "But I’ve lost my
faith in men,” she declared. “I won
der if they’re all the same?” No. lit
tle girl, there’s just as much difference
between men as there is between girls.
NfcWS FROM HAWAII.
At the time of the sailing of the
I last steamer which arrived from
Honolulu at San Francisco, it was ex
pected in the island that an American
protectorate over Hawaii would soon
1 proclaimed. t
This will be news of a somewhat
startling nature to Americans, but
there is no telling what the annexation
syndicate will force the President
to do.
Nothing would be a surprise. The
American people are not in the secret,
as the people of Honolulu appear to be.
Another item of Hawaiian news is
to the effect that Hawaii has an in
come tax law which went into effect
on July 1. The first section reads as
follows:
•From and after the 1st day of July.
1SST. there shall be levied, assessed, col
lected and paid annually upon the gains-,
profits and income derived by every per
son residing in the republic, and by every
person residing without the republic, from
ail property owned, and every business,
trade, profession. or employment
or vocation carried on in the republic,
and by every servant or officer of the re
public. wherever residing, a tax of 1 per
cent, on the amout so derived, provided,
that while the gains, profits or income of
any auch person who resides within the
republic, or of any servant or officer of
the republic wherever residing shall not
have exceeded the sum of $1,000 for the
preceding twelve months, only so much of
such sains, profits or income as exceeds
the sum of $2,u00. shall be liable to such
tax.” .. , ..
In another part of the act it is stip
ulated that incomes not exceeding $1.
500 shall be exempt from taxation. As
the Louisville Courier Journal points
out. this is to all intents and purposes
as much a tax on thrift as the act that
was nullified by our Supreme Court
was alleged to*be. It Is liable to all
the objections of that act, including
the exemption of a certain amount of
income from taxation altogether.
If the annexation of Hawaii would
nullify the law, it might be some com
fort to the opponents of the income
tax, most of whom are enthusiastic an
nexationists. But it is not probable |
that it would do so. The decision of
the Supreme Court only related to the
power of Congress to levy an income
tax. This tax was imposed by the
Legislature of Hawaii, and the annex
ation treaty does not annul it. It is
conceded by everybody that State Leg- |
islatures may enact income tax laws.
Whether Hawaii is to become a State i
is not yet apparent, but there is the
existing law. with which it would ap
Royal makes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious.
.POWDER
Absolutely Pur*
/ £
••• -
tpv»i mwwa powaes eo.. w»w yowl
pear Hawaii must come in if annexed {
at all. This discovery is certainly one
of interest, and may prove an obstacle
to annexation, since the annexation
syndicate is composed of multi-mil- !
lionaires who have a deep rooted aver
sion to paying taxes on their wealth.
-,-o
THK SILVER MARKET.
The Wall street bullion jugglers are
sending out some queer reports of the
silver market these days. They are
filling the financial columns of the
press of the country with “new low
price records,” which these very bul
lion jugglers are able to create to or
der, by aid of their partners in the
great gold bunko game in Lombard
street, London. It reminds one of the
fact that ever since the Wolcott bi
metallism commisron has been prom- i
inent in Europe, the slick gentlemen
who compose the British money power
have been bringing all their forces to !
bear to depress the price of silver bul
lion. in order to impress upon Presi
dent McKinley’s commission an al
leged “object lesson” as to how
“worthless” and “unstable” silver is,
which, while silver is demonetized :
practically the world over, is an easy
thing for these gold gamblers who con-1
trol the world’s finances to do.
But in this country the bullion man
ipulators of Wall street are too anxious
to do the bidding of their employers
and correspondents in London, and :
they are indiscreet in the manner in j
which they over-state the case against j
silver. For example, in yesterday's
papers they went so far as to state
that “there is practically no demand”
for silver. This is not in accord with
the following table covering the ex
ports of silver in ounces, not including
150,000 Mexican dollars, for the past
three weeks:
Date. ounces
July 14 .225.000
Ju y 15 . 437.000
July is' .522.000
juV 21 .350.000
July 22 !.475.000
July .150,000
July 95 .705.000 I
jSly » :::::::.a®.
July "30 ’1.200.000
August 1 ...
August 4 .io- lw
August 5 ..
5.350.000
Over five and a quarter millions of
ounces of silver exported in the past
three weeks certainly does not show
that “there is practically no demand”
for, silver, as the Wall street bullion
jugglers tell us.
BSlpi.
A Fatal Accident at the Bellaire Steel
Plant,
In Which Robert Castoe, of Bell
aire is the Victim—Caused by a
Frail Scaffold—The Labor Mass
Meeting—General Local News,
Personal and Otherwise.
A fatal and deplorable accident oc
curred last evening at about 5:45 at
the new Bellaire steel plant, which is
now under construction, caused
by the giving way of a frail scaffold
ing, and by which Robert Castoe. of
North Guernsey street, lost his life.
Yesterday being pay day for the force
of men who are employed on the im
provements, Mr. Castoe, who was man
aging the work, went to the top of one
of the stacks to pay some of the men,
and after doing so, jumped from the
stack onto a rude scaffolding which
surroundeded the structure a short dis
tance below the pinnacle, and as he
alighted the construction proved too
wdak and breaking precipitated Mr.
Castoe to the ground, a distance of
twenty feet. As he shot down he was
seen to fall feet first, but turning in
the air he alighted on his head at the
bottom, cutting a deep gash across the
forehead and making a deep hole in the
back of the head, caused by a large
heap of castings among which he fell.
Dr. McCollough was immediately sum-1
moueti artd on arriving found that in
addition to his other wounds that he
had sustained a fracture of the neck,
lie was carried into the mill, where he
died about six o’clock.
The scaffolding on the stack was
'considered a very strong structure until
the sad accident of yesterday.
The deceased was about twenty-nine
years of age and is a brother of M. A.
Cascoe, foreman of the Standard Boiler
and Bridge, of Bellaire. About three
weeks ago Mr. Castoe and his family
moved to Bellaire from Portsmouth. O.,
at which place he was employed In the
Norfolk and Western railroad shops.
A wife and two daughters, one five |
and the other two years old. survive
to mourn his loss. The remains of the ,
unfortunate man will be removed from
his late residence on North Guernsey
street and taken to Syracuse, O., where
the funeral will t3ke place from the
residence of Mrs. Castoe’s mother. Mrs.
White. The family in their sad be
reavement have the sympathy of a host
of friends.
LAST NIGHT S MEETING.
A large mass meeting was held In the
vicinity of Thirty-second and Union streets
last night for the purpose of arousing
sympathy and soliciting aid for the strik
ing miners. The meeting was attended to
the extent of about three or four thousand i
people, who were quick to express them- ,
selves in favor of the strikers by a roar
ing applause at every remark made by the
speaker in behalf of their welfare.
Together with the Rev. H. S. Boyd it
was intended to have the meeting address
ed by C. L. Poorman. but owing to the
absence of Mr. Mahon from the Wheeling
mass meeting. Col. Poorman was sent for
to fill the vacancy.
It was rather late when the meeting was
called to order, on account of a lawn fete
which was held at the U. P. Church last
night, necessitating Mr. Boyd's presence.
During fhe delay the crowd that had as
sembled was entertained by Hackett's
band in the rendition of some very beau
tiful music. It was about half-past eight
o’clock when the meeting was opened.
Rev. Boyd spoke very* tersely on the sub
ject of the miners' strike, touching strong
ly on the action of Judge Mason and Sher
iff Lowery In his denunciation, and be-,
seeching the miners to continue with the
excellent order and v ise discretion that
they had employed so far through the
strike. He also portrayed the condition
of some of the local miners and besought
the people to lend them any assistance
which was at their disposal.
Mr. Boyd concluded his remarks with an
expression of earnest desire that the finale
of the present agitation would mean suc
cess. Throughout the entire meeting Mr.
Boyd was warmly applauded and espec
ially at the conclusion of the meeting at
ten o'clock, when three cheers were given.
A LIVELY ROW.
A lively row occurred in Bellaire last
night which resulted In two young
ladies severing their friendship for
ever. A Miss Victor McDade.
who has been making her abode
with a Miss Patsy Brown, of the Second
ward, resolved last evening to dissolve
partnership, and began preparing her (
clothing for a hasty retreat, when she was
reprimanded by her hostess, and a very
warm debate ensued, which terminated in
a skirmish. Miss Victor breaking away
from her assailant, ran to the City Hall i
and informed Officers Lynskey and John- ,
son. who immediately repaired to the ‘
house and succeeded In releasing her prop- 1
erty. The two officers presented quite a ;
ludicrous spectacle as they journeyed to
the City Hail bearing the mistreated
young lady's belongings, wherl Miss Mc
Dade was given a night's lodging and her
property safely deposited.
GENERAL LOCAL NEWS.
Martin Ney. of the Third ward, who has
been attending the Pharmacy College at
Scio, Ohio, arrived home last evening, a
graduate of the profession.
Mrs. Emma J. Porterfield, of the Third |
ward, is a guest tff friends at Kirkwood.
The O. U. A. M.. I. O. O. F. and K. of P.
lodges of this city have received urgent in
vitations to attend the picnic to be held at
Wheeling August 14. by the Bridgeport
Orientals.
Alta May Allum. who has been visiting j
her grandparents. Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong
of the First ward, returned to her home
in Dunkirk. Ind.. last evening.
Miss Daisy Johnson, who has been vis
iting her sister, Mrs. George E. Work, at
Sistersville, has returned home.
At the Globe—J. Wasserman,' James T. j
Toge, Cleveland: Bharles Vadakin, New
ark: Ernest Baer. A. G. Wincher, G. E.
Wlncher, Wheeling.
At the Anderson—S. S. Foreman, St. !
Clairsville; E. B. Armstrong. Armstrong’s
Mills; W. H. Sipe, Batesvllle; Ormond S.
Newhall, Columbus.
At the Exchange—L. C. Dennman, Cin
cinnati; John L. Riley. Columbus; W. A.
Warren, Philadelphia: C. N. Gardiner.
New York: A. S. Roberts. Cleveland; D.
C. McAlier, Pittsburg; Sam S. Cadad.
Cleveland.
L. Perry, who has been a porter at the
Globe for some time past, has severed his
conection with that hotel, leaving on
friendly terms, and is now employed at
the Exchange.
At the Windsor—Wm. M. Smith. Pied
mont. W. Va.; C. L. Robinson, Fairmont,
W. Va.; George W. Yost, H. M. Yost,
F. S. Chandler, Cleveland, O.
Tom. the eleven year old son of Mr. and j
Mr. Charles Durant, died Wednesday night J
at his home in the First ward of meningi
tis. caused by injuries received a week ago ;
while he was getting out of bed. In some
manper he lost his balance and was pre
cipitated to the floor, striking his head
against the bed post and injuring his
spine. The funeral will take place this af
ternoon with interment at Rose Hill ceme
tery.
Miss Jennie Garret and sister left Wed
nesday night over the Baltimore & Ohio
for Atlantic City.
S. W. Lawrence, the Sistersville livery
man, was in the city yesterday’ negotiat
ing for a horse deal.
A boy by the name of Smith was run
down in the Second ward Wednesday
night while attempting to pass in front of
a team atached to a carriage. The horses
and vehicle passed over his body, but for
tunately he escaped injury^ which is in
deed a miracle.
Benjamin McNeal was arrested yester
day afternoon on the charge of adultery,
by W. W. Wright, who was sworn In by
’Squlr*1 Morrell. The charges were pre
ferred by a Mr. King. ’Squire Morrell
and Constable Neal' are letting nothing
stand in the way in locating Mrs. King.
Last night they telephoned to Officer Lyn
skey at the City Hall, and thinking they
were conected with Bridgeport, by the lo
cal line, told him to bo on the alert for
a woman weighing about one hundred and
forty-five pounds, and wearing a black
skirt, black hat and white shirt waist.
-V, ,
A BIG BELMONT COUNTY MEET- |
ING.
Yesterday morning five or six hun-1
dred miners and farmers assembled at
St. Clairsville Junction, where they
were addressed by Sherman Glasgow j
and other speakers upon the striko i
issue. The meeting was a very sue- i
cessful oit-e from- a strike point of
view.
-o
$3.00—LOW RATE—$3.00. EXCUR
SION TO CINCINNATI. VIA B. & 0. |
Saturday. August 7th. the B. & O
will sell excursion tickets, Wheeling to
Cincinnati and return at the extremely
low rate of $3.00, good 4 days. Trains
leave Wheeling 10:40 a. m. and 11:40
p. m.
DIED.
SEYBOLD—Wednesday mornlne. Antr
im 4:h. 1W at 2:45 o'clock* Sitella C.. wife
of the late Peter Seybo’.d. aetd 52 year.®.
Funeral services at her late residence.
No. 51S Main street, on Friday afternoon
at 3:3ft o'clock. Friends of family respect
fully invited to attend. Interment a: Mt.
Wood cemetery. Please omit flowers.
UNDERTAKING._
T OILS BERTcCH i.
T-i (Formerly of l-re* A R»rr«e>tr.>
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
INI) AKTKIU.4L EMbAidtKK.
1116 Main St., r a.t Sid*.
r*?l« h? AR»*rer*d Jit or ni^i*. •
6tor% telephone. *>*15; re§»d#ac«* mjl 1
pRIEND & SON.-"
Fimaral Dir3Ctprs anl EnTnlnnrs.
prompt ATrLsriax jay o^ inir.
Telephosk Calij*—Store 2'K Albart -I»T»r»
ire*ideuce* 541.
r EXXEDY F, FREW,
IV OralMiek U. S*C*ilj|5>. EeSUaii*,.
FURERAL DIRECTOR 4 EMBALIER
With ALEXANl) REW.
1208 MAM 3
Telephone 2-9._ap3*«
Vf AX L. HESS,
1y-L Cut Flowers and Fu Work a
specialty. Fine plants, shiu , trees;
etc. Greenhouses. National I edit oi
[ city- Telephone 1632. mySedc V

PIANOS-C. A- HOUSE.
HARD TO TELL '• $v|
VfXJt vpvp A.WM^J9A.fWfA!f nwwwtw
WHICH IS THE BEST,
THE EMERSON OB
IVERS & POND PIANOS.
^MMmm
After playing on them, you feel as did the younc
lady who sang to her two lovers, "Oh, I could be
happy witn either, were the other dear charmei
away.” Call and see them, and also a large line
of other makes of Pianos.
1324 AND 1326 MARKET STREET.
SPECTACLES AND EYEGLASSES.
^l-COOL, PLEASANT OPTICAL PARLOR.*?
Don’t neglect your eyes thinking it is too hot to have them attended
to. We have the only exclusive Optical Panor in the city and can givo
you comfortable and satisfactory service.
HENRY W. ETZ, Optician, t:<cllA?S.l
WANTED._
WANTED—Two furnished rooms for light
housekeeping. Address J. H. S., 122" Mar
ket street. _au<*~r
WANTED—Two experienced picture so
licitors at once. Enquire at 28 Tenth St.,
2nd tloor. _ au«q
WANTED—A position by a registered
druggist; 12 years experience; good ref
erences. Addrtss DRUGS, Register office.
uu3eradr
WANTED—Wholesale grocery salesman
with JloO, to assume management of cash
selling specialty alriady introduced. M. J.,
Register office. au3eda
WANTED—Rcok case, walnut wood,
about 4 feet 9 inches wide and 8 feet high.
Must be substantially built and in good
condition. Any person who possesses a
case they wish to sell can find a purchaser
If they will sell at a low price. Adrress.
naming: price and dimensions. BOOK
CASE, care the Register. aulesdq
GROCERS. '
Ball-bearing
.WRINGERS
Are as much of an Improvement over the
old style wringers as they were over the
old way of wringing clothes by hand. See
them at _ __
H. F. BEHRENS CO.
DRUGGISTS.
nPAKEGAY’S GRANULES FOR
X YOUR LIVER.
That torpid liver needs renovating to
cure your headache, dizziness and bilious
ness. Ask for Gay’s Granule* and take
no other. They are purely vegetable, easy
to take and pleasant in their action.
DICKSON S PHARMACY.
Sole Agents._ 1202 Market street.
BICYCLES.
t»»1» i*«T <tf>
vmi MAV CYAMINC Oar Wheel* rlo«el v
IUU lufll CiAflininti We fit) nut object
We would rather have you do It. They
will stand dose Inspection. We ask -fur
them. You will get umre than that amount
of pleasure and satisfaction out of them.
GEO. W. JOHNSON S SONS,
1910 MAIN MI'RKKT.
Tea Clubs
>
We will Interest
you. fiend uc your
address uu a Postal
Card.
AMERICAN TEA CO.,
Pittsburg. Pa.
DRY G03DS __
TWO DRIVES!
SHIRT WAISTS.
AOn for your choice of any
VJfill °f our hi&h priced
Waists.
A large lot of Waists QCa
that sold at 50c to ^
$2.00.
CtCH
CORSETS.
A big lot of Corsets,
full sizes,brokenas- I {11.
sortments, $yC to....
W11KTU DOLIiLt
J.S.Rhodes&Co.
WE’VE GOT ’EM!
Legii Blanks of every descrip*
i tion. Fins paper. Just wnat
*>, you want.
Hfr WEST VIRGINIA PRINTING C#
WhMUac.W. V.
A *•'
Ur
NEW advertisements. _
FOR RENT—Dwelling house on Chaplin*
street. North of Eleventh street. No.
Apply GEO. DUSCH, 1062 Market street.
au7edh.
VnTH E TO WATER C0N8U
A^ MKHS.
Will clean north half of reservoir com
mencinK Saturday. August 7th, at 6 o'clock
a. m. Parties living on high ground had
best catch water to do over Saturday.
Please dispense the use of hose as much
as possible.
C. M. OLIVER.
au6q Superintendent.
prill.ic sali: OP NORTH
A MARKET STREET PROPERTY.
In order to clo9e the estate of the late
Patrick Kenney, deceased, the following
property will be offered at public sale at
the front door of the Court Hou?«e of Ohio
County on Saturday morning. September
the 4ih. 1*5*7. ai ten o'clock: One two-story
brick dwelling with basement, fronting
on the west side of Market, between Fiftn
and Sixth streets. Also one two-story
brick dwelling on the same lot. fronting
on Alley B. The same will be off* r>d as a
whole or in two parts, to suit purchaser.
J. J. KENNEY.
Admr. of P. Kenney, dec'd.
J. C. HERVEY.
Auctioneer. au6cl
JJOTICR TO CONTRACTORS.
Bids will he received for repair* to Se©.
ond Ward Market Hons* until noon, Mon
day. August 9th. 1*97. Plans and specifica
tions on tile at office of City Engineer,
Public Building.
Ct )MMITTKE ON MAR K ETS.
allots W. 11. Haller, Chairman.
J^OTICE TO THE PI BLIC.
I hav* this tlay taken oath btfore J
tlce John W. Schultxe, that from this
I will totally abstain from 'lriukirig
intoxicating beverage* of any chsra
whatevtr. and hereby warn all **-b«-r»
Intoxicating heverag* - not to «*!! or g
me any drink*, or harbor me on th
premise*.
LOUIS A4W. 8CHNELLE..
No. i> Sixteenth Streej,
Wheeling. August ith. 1W7. tui.'ea
n H. QUIMIJV,
1414 Market Street,
Dealer In Rook*. Stationery. Periodical*,
Newspaper*. Bibiea, Hymn Book*. Gospel
Hymns. Easter Card* very cheap. B*m
Ball Stock, Foot Balia, Hammock*, am
We wish to call
The attention of-—
l abor Organizations
To the Union Label.
TEK yOU have done. V
We have authority to u*e the abovt |
LABEL on all work, and solicit your pat- I
ron age. I
WEST VIRGINIA PRINTING CO.. I
122S-1227 Market Street. |
J^OTICE.
WHEELING. W. Va.. July »th, D*7.
This Is to certify that my late huaban 1,
. F. Aiehlman. Jr., held twenty #20) *har«i
of Protective Stock in the Guarantee Is-ar
and Trust #Co., of Wheeling. XV. Va., «nd
through the Provident Life Insunyice Co,,
! of Wheeling, have thl* day received the
t amount of two thou*and dollar* (|2,0UQ),
being the full maturity of said stock.
Dated at Wheeling, thl* 25th day of July,
i Wn' Signed. LIZZIE MEHLMAN.
; JyJleadq __ *
| WHITE MOUNTAIN
ICE CREAM FREEZERS.
The only Froeier that will fro-zs cream la
four <•*/ minute*.
NKMtirr ft into
1314 Market *»
RATS AND ROACHES
pi rki.y plaiw nr
MAURER’S PASTE.
MAURER'S POWDER
S FW», AniP. Kt . Bi.:lt ••!/ ti W
330 North 8th St.. Phil*., §’•
^£ERC'H ANTS’ HOT LCNTH.
Kvery day from U a. m. Roast Beef, Po>
I tatoes. Bread, Butter and Coffee, SO cia
Daily change of ohl of fare. Ladle*' an<
gentlemen's parlor attached. Everythin!
in season to tempt the palate. Entrance
on Fourteenth street to parlors.
: WIGWAM RESTAURANT AND CAI-E,
3- Brubaker. Proprietor.
• F0R SALE-M SCELLANEO'JS.
BONDS FOR SALE.
Ravens wood Spencer and GlenviUe R R i
Whitaker Iron Co.
Fostorla Glass Co.
Wheeling Pottery.
Piedmont Water Works.
Eellalre Steel Co.
Wheeling Steel and Iron Co.
HOWARD HAZLETT.
Sew Exchange Baak Baildiag,
Stocks. Bonds and Inveatmaats._
•»
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