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Wheeling register. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1878-1935, August 24, 1897, Image 2

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THE MAJOR'S OHOST.
It was the twelfth annual dinner of
the cluh. and the Colonel, the Major,
the Captain and myself, were seated
around the table, with the wine and
fruits before us. We were the remain
der of the club, which originally con
tained all the officers belonging to our
regiment that had come out of the
war alive. At our first gathering there
were fifteen of us, but the hardships
and wounds of those four bitter years j
had taken the others away. Every year
there had been one plate less,
until the present, and we had begun
to look upon our final dissolution as a j
thing inevitably fixed by fate. But the ;
four who had met the previous year ]
were together again, and we gladly •
drained a glass to the discomfiture j
of the broken spell.
It had not been our fate to have the j
fame of victory w ithout toil, for our9 j
had been a fighting regiment, and we <
were proud of it. Daugers met and
shared together made the bonds of
our friendship strong indeed, and
these yearly meetings were rich in the
stories of old times—stories told of the
daring or kindness of some one who
had passed to the everlasting peace of
ieath. None of us were old men. The J
colonel had just reached 40; the major j
was 35, and the captain was three
years his senior, while I was three j
years his junior. We were all marred
except the major, and it was a source
of great wonder to us that he was
not so, for the major was just the man
who could have made a good woman's
life joyous and bright.
Handsome, brave, generous, talented,
a delightful talker, an author of^ no
common merit, and possessed of a'for
tune ampie euougn xo niaae xne worm s
comforts and many of its luxuries ac
cessible, the major was sought for in
society, and was ever ready to respond
to the call. But while attentive to all
the women with whom he was thrown
in contact, the major was noted for
the impartiality with which he be- i
stowed these attentions. We knew' that!
he could easily carry off a desirable
prize, but he never made the attempt.
As our long knowledge of his char
acter had shown up his chivalrous de
votion to women, and a9 we knew that
during our acquaintance he had never
had preference for any speclul one, we
were puzzled to know why this was so.
We had made him the point of subtle
attacks regarding the matter, but the
major was a good strategist, and he
turned the fiauk of every forward i
movement we essayed in this direc- j
tion. diverting our talk into other>
channels, until at last we had dropped i
the matter as one that might touch ;
on a sorrow’ of which we knew noth
ing. The talk had been lively all
through the evening, centering about
reminiscenxes of jovial times during
a raid we had made, which had been
ixrolifie of amusing adventure.
The major had shown at his best,
and we had listened to his humorous
narrative with keen delight. So the
dinuer had passed, and the dessert was
before us. the servants had been dis
missed. and cigars were lit. Then one
of those unaccountable silences that
sometimes come to such assemblages
fell upon us, and we puffed away at
our cigars, and said nothing, until the
etillness griw strangely weird and.
powerful.
Suddenly the major stopped smok- '
lng. and. looking at each of us in turn,
said: “You have often wondered whv
Tam not married, and now I will tell
you.
“It is not a long story, but u •
be of interest to you, and. as we are I
all that is left. 1 have thought that the
•ecret should be shared between us.
“When the war came. I had hut just
graduated from college, and. as you
know, enlisted as a private. U was no
easy matter for rae to do this, but I ;
felt it to be my duty. I was young, j
strong, and able to fight. T had means j
to make the life of a soldier as com
fortable as it could be made, and while !
my mind longed for literary and peace
ful scenes. I still felt that I owed my
country a duty. It was but a short
time after I enlisted when we were
ordered South. The regiment, as you
know, had hard work and plenty of it.
but my part was as well rewarded as
T could wish, for 1 was soon advanced
lo the command of my company.
“You remember the time when we
went south of the Rappahannock, and
were quartered in that queer little vil
lage. where, even though we were foes,
the people treated us so kindly You
must also remember the large house
back of the village, the one that
crowned the hill on whose sides were
so many orchards? Well. I had been
but a day in the village when l found
out that it was the native place of
Harry Wynne, my college chum, and
also the house on the hill was his
home.
“For a few days T refrained from
calling, thinking that my uniform
might be distasteful to Harry's mother
and sisters, for he had gone with his
State and was an officer in Ijoe’s army.
At last my desire to know something
of my old friend grew too strong to
| At first thougnt j
lit seems impossi- j
%le that any hu- |
man being should ;
wilfullv embrace j
death. Yet thou
sands of women
-daily court the
Igri m - ▼ isage d j
■ monster. Some (
Ido so through ig- j
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♦ through wtltnl |
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after the health of the organs most essential j
to her womanhood ignorantly or wilfully
courts death, and deatm in a slow and ago- J
Rising form Ills of this description render
a woman's life a daily burden, and approach
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An infallible euro for all weakne-^ and dis
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There is nothing "just the same ” or 'just
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■ »l>e;ter From then until I was sick. I carried
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worked in the garden everv day besides my
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T women said I had an easier time than any
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__
HPHERE is a right way to paint
and a wrong way. The right
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applied by a practical painter. The
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also cards showing pictures of tweUe houses of different designs pamted ia
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NATIONAL LEAD CO., CINCINNATI BRANCH,
Cor. 7th St. and Freeman Ave., Cincinnati, O.
be kept down with such scruples, and
one afternoon I walked to the house,
and, passing up the broad carriageway
running from the read to the door,
went slowly up the steps leading to
the pleasant and shady veranda, and
just as I was about sounding a mas
sive old-fashioned knocker the door
was thrown open, and a young and
beautiful woman stood before me.
The laugh that had been a moment
before rippling from her lips, ceased,
and she started back with a slight
gesture of alarm, but ray doffed cap
and peaceful attitude reassured her,
and she stood waiting.
“Is Mrs. Wynne in?” I asked.
“ ‘My mother is at home; who shall
I say desires to see her?’
“ ‘Charles Talbot, a class-mate of her
son. and at present with the regiment
quartered in the village.'
“ ‘What, are you the Charley Talbot
who was Harry’s chum at college?’
“ ‘I am.’
“ ‘Then come in, for we all seem to
know you. and though on opposite
sides, are friends,’ and she held out her
hand.
“I took it. and its warm clasp thrill
ed me strangely, as did the clear glance
of the bright eyes that were upturned
to mine.
‘“I am Mabel Wynne. Harry’s sis
ter,’ she went on. 'We have heard so
much from Harry concerning you, and
often louged to meet you. Harry said
that he knew you would be in the
Northern army, but for us. in your
case, there is no war. Please be seat
ed. and I will call mother.’
“We had passed into a large, cool
drawing-room while she had been
speaking, and she had thrown open a
window that gave me a fine view of
a IcvpI sweep of country, in which the
Rappahannock rolled between green
orchards, and fields rich with the gold
of ripened wheat. Here she left me.
and soon returned with a middle-aged
lady, whose beauty w’as of that quiet,
motherly kind, so rich in the power
that makes one comfortable and at
ease. I found that, despite my an
tagonistic uniform. I was held a frigid;
and glad was I to know this, for the
first glance of Mabel Wynne's eyes
had broken down the barriers that
I bail raised against love—barriers of
which 1 have made many_ boasts J:o
would, my future life would gamer
its joy from her kindness, or have no
joy at all. I was invited to remain to
supper, and did so; and, when duty
forced me to take my leave, was asked
to make my calls as frequent as my
time and inclination would permit.
“You can easily surmise that both
time and inclination made the inter
vals between my visits very' short,
and I soon noticed that the door was
always opened by Mabel, often ere I
had reached the steps leading to the
verandah. Who could mistake the
motive of such a mark of favor? And
you can know that to my soul this
brought a glory that was brighter
than sunshine, and whose music was
sweeter than the spring chorus of
birds. . .. . .
“I have not told you of Mabel
Wynne’s beauty. It was of that clear.
fresh. Saxon type, such as denotes a
bright and sunny disposition. And she
wa* as merry and kind as one could
wish, possessing a finely cultivated
mind, a sparkling wit, and that sweet,
ringing voice that made it a delight
to sit and listen to her talk. As you
know we were only quartered two
months in that village; but before our
regiment marched southward I had
asked Mabel Wynne to be my wife
and hml heard her low voice tell of
love that I knew would bless me
through all the years. Her mother
cave a willing consent, and the tune
fixed for our union was the close of
the war. .. , ,
• Th-n came our marching orders, and
the raid In which I won my major s com
mission. During the year that followed,
and the campaign of which Gettysburg
w is the conclusion. I heard frequently
from Mabel, for the communication be
tween her home and our lines was kept
oocn. The last tremendous struggle out
ward with Grant quickly followed mis.
and. as you know, we were on patrol
duty and reconnolterng all the time; and
when the tlank movement began, kep*
well on the outskirts of the army, and
made the last raid down the peninsula,
which brought the crisis of iny life.
"l>o you rc-memher the day we were ex
pecting to m<- t Fitz-Hugh s men. I was
on picket duty that evening, and had a
battalion of our regiment deployed along
a read that ran through some broken
country. Just after the night began to
deepen, and the shadows lay heavy be
tween the trees that flanked the road, the
rapid gallop of a horse sounded up from
a narrow valley; and. telltr.g the men near
to be ready. 1 rode down the sloping
grourd to meet the person approaching,
goon I came to a place that gave me com
mand of a long stretch of road, and halt
ed ju-t in the shadow. In another moment
a horseman dashed into view, and came
rapidly toward me. As soon as my voice
could be heard. I commanded a halt, but
the order was unheeded.
•• -Halt, or 1 tire!’ I cried, and still the
horse came dashing on; and the next in
stant my pistol was leveled, and the sharp
report rang out on the still night. With
a low cry the horseman tumbled from
the saddle; and the flutter of a white
robe made me spring to the ground and
run to where the prostrate form was ly
ing.
"The person I had mistaken for a foe
was a woman: and. as 1 bent over the
white face. I felt my heart grow cold, for
it was the face of Mabel Wynne.
"I took her In my arms, and her eyes
looked up in mine, so full of love that I
sobbed like a child.
" ‘Oh. my darling, my darling.’ I cried,
what brought you here?'
•• 'I heard you were with the troops,
Charlie, and I wished to see you.’
•• ’And I have killed you, and blighted
my life.’ I answered.
“ ‘No, not blighted it. Charlie, you did
not mean to harm me, and it was my
fault.’
“Even with the chill of death making :
her blood grow cold, her love would ^jiot I
let me bear blame. I saw she was rapTuly
growing weaker, and. saying I wourfi get
a surgeon, was turning away when she
stopped me.
" ‘No, it will be useless.’ she said. 'I
am visiting at a house only a short dis
tance away; take me there.’
“Binding up the wound as well as I
could. I obeyed her. And In that house,
clasped in my arms, her head on my
heart, she died, and there I left her lying
! asleep.
“I wrote an account of the affair and
sent it to her mother, and one to Harry’.
, They both answered, telling me they held
me free from blame. But more comfort
ing than this, more comforting than
aught but her living form here, is the
knowledge T have that her spirit is with
me; that her love is still my own, and
will forever be so. I have seen her face;
I have heard her voice; I have felt the
pressure of her lips; and soon we will be
together, and the love that was sepa
rated for a time on earth will he Joined
, in heaven for ail eternity. I can see her
now. H3 beautiful and kind as in the old
years. Yes, I can see her; and is
mine.”
The major ceased talking. A glad light
grew brilliant in his eyes and sufTused his
face. Then he covered this with his
hands. We did not say anything for a
time; hut at last the silence grew oppres
sive.
"Let us take some wine.” said the col- j
onel. And all but the major filled their |
glasses.
“Win you not join us, major?” asked
the colonel.
He did not answer, and the colonel rose,
and, going to his side, touched him.
There was no response.
The colonel took down his hands and a
chill fell upon us.
The major was dead.—New York Daily
News.
_n
THREE MEN KILLED.
Cairo. 111., August 23—Three men
were instantly killed -and eight in
jured by the explosion of a boiler at
the brick yard of •W. R. Halliday,
shortly after 7 a. m The dead are:
Ruley Bradley, engineer; Gideon
Kicks. Henry Schiller. All those kill- I
ed and Injured were negroes «Tco«-rt 1
Schiller. None of the injured will die.
The cause of the explosion is Un
known.
-o-—
INCREASE OF PENSION.
Special to the Register.
Washington. August 23.—Vesparian
Cather. of Greenwood. W. Va., has
been granted a restoration and in
crease of pension.
A. E. LYNCH
Will Be the Sew Postmaster at Wonnds
vllle_Capt. Dovener Makes the Recom
mendation,
Special to the Register
Washington, D. C., August -3.
Congressman Dovener has recommend
ed for appointment as postmaster at
Moundsville Mr. A. E. Lynch. The
term of the present postmaster vill
expire on September 24th.
Of the 466 fourth-class postmasters
which Assistant Postmaster Bristow
celebrated his return from his vacation
by appointing yesterday, West irginia
got only five, as follows:
At Adaniston, Harrison county, Got
tleib Schutte, vice L. W. Garrett, re
moved. ,
At Fairview, Hancock county. M. B.
Shay, vice D. L. Evans, removed.
At Lumberport, Harrison county. W.
E. Riblett, vice V. L. Honor, removed.
At Middleway, Jefferson county, R.
C. Anderson, vice N. R. Roberts, re
moved. '
At Proctor, Wetzel county, Alice
Wingrove, vice S. C. Moore, removed.
Samuel Bailey was appointed post
master at Beverly, Washington coun
ty, O., vice. J. R. Ball, resigned, and A.
j. Ault at Jeddo, Jefferson county, O.,
vice Scott McMillin, removed.
Commissions have been issued to
Charles M. D. Bennett as postmaster
at Capon Springs; to Filmore Jones
at Haywood; John J. Miller at Mar
shall, and Joshua Moore at Vannoys
Mill, W. Va. _
The contract for carrying the U. S.
mail from Alice to Greenville. W. Va.,
has been awarded to M. J. Bush, of
Alice, and from Rlanche to Fairview
to J. L. Yaden, of London, Ky.
ENGLAND'S EASTERN TROUBLES.
Simla August 23.—A large force of
Afridis have just been reported to be
advancing down the Khyber Pass and
the so-called Mad Mullah or fanatical
priest, who is inciting the natives of
that territory against the British, is
said to have collected the Mohamands
for an attack upon Michni and
Shabkdr. _ , ,
London, August 33.—An official (*is
patch from Peshawur announces that
the Afridis attacked Ali Musjed this
morning and adds that they were at
tacking Fort Maude at 10:30 a. m. to
day, The enemy’s line is a mile and a
half long.
Another body of Afridis, the dis
patch continues, is moving toward
Kadam.
All the Afridis are said to have
joined in the uprising. The news con
tained in this official dispatch is most
important. Probably meaning a pro
rracted campaign and desperate fight
ing.
KILLED HIM INSTANTLY.
Chicago. August 23.—A huge derrick
spoon weighing 1,000 pounds and con
taining half a ton of salt, fell to the
deck of the steamer Fitzgerald, which
was loading at Illinois Central pier
No. 10 to-day. Andrew Kruper, a
laborer, was stooping over the hatch
way just as the ropes parted. His
head was caught on the edge of the
hatchway and mashed to a pulp. John
Cool, also a laborer, had his left leg
nearly severed from his body.
—-o
WILLING TO EXTEND TREATY.
Havana. August 23.—A special dis
patch from Madrid says there is no
doubt the Spanish government will
be willing to extend the commercial
treaty with the United States.
CASTORIA
For Infants and Children.
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EVERYDAY FACTS and the WHEELING
WEEKLY REGISTER for one year for $1.25,
cash in advance.
EVERYDAY FACTS alone, 25c.
Address:
THE REGISTER,
WHEELING, W. VA.
EDUCATIONAL.
- -J-rrjyL-iAnji.nnr,‘*-‘ m ** ^ *»■ ■.»»«>■ • mm0
LINSLY INSTITUTE.
School for the thorough Instruction of
boys and young men. Military, Classical,
English.
Fall term begins Monday. September 13.
1897. For catalogues or other Information,
address any member of the Board of
Trustees, or John M. Birch, Ph. D„ Prin
cipal. _
Board of Trustees—Hon. A. W. Camp
bell, president; A. J. Clarke. Esq., vice
president; John L. Dickey, M. D., secre
tary- R. C. Dalzell. Esq., treasurer; Will
iam B. Simpson, F.sq.. John J. Jones. Esq..
Hon. N. E. Whitaker. John S. Naylor.
Esq.. Augustus Pollack. Esq.. Hon. J. B
Sommerville, Hon. William P. Hubbard,
Rev. Jacob Brittlngham. Henry M. Rus
sell, Esq., William P. Stifel, Esq.
JylSsu.tu.flr
M0NT~DE CHANTAL,
NEAR WHEELING, W. VA.
Studies will be resumed at this Academy
SEPTEMBER 8th. 1897.
The advantages of this academy for
mental and physical culture are unsur
passed. The day scol&rs dine and lunch
at the Mount and are taken to and from
the motor by a conveyance provided by
the sisters free of charge.
For terms and further information ad
dress
DIRECTRESS
OF MOXTDKCHANTAL
All trains stop at the Academy.
tu.th, sat, sun
BETHEL MRITARf ACADEMY, Vi.
$1(in,(W!. M miles from Washington in
Northern Virginia, pr^y^rt* for advanced study
and for business Ctorge* extremely low. Putmnavr
fromSiStstes. Adi'r*** for illustrated estslogue,
R. A. McINTYRE. near Wsrrenton. \ ».
— w
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.
Letters, Science, La.?. Medicine, Engineering
Sessioa betlrs lath September, la the osa-m»!«risl
PieJmoat rerloa. Excel ea: rymoaaitim. For caialofue*
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Jyat.t.s.rv
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FOR CINCIN
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\ XI > INTER
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l0Steamer •‘VIRGINIA.” T. S. Calhoun.
Master; Robert H. Kerr. Purser. Every
3"steamer "KEYSTONE STATE.’* C. W.
Knox. Master; Dan I^acey. Purser. Every
Tuesday 8 a. m.
Steamer “QUEEN CITY." Robt. R. Ag
new. Master; James Gardner, Purser.
Every Thursday 8 a. m.
For freight or passage telephone ?30.
CROCKARD & BOOTH.
Ju21 _Ag^nts^
FINANCIAL.
O LAMB. I JOB SJ8YB0LD C« hi r.
I J. A. JEFFERSON. Asst Cashier.
BANK OF WHEELING,
CAPITAL $230,033 PAID IN.
WHEELING, W. VA.
DIRECTORS.
A. Reymann. Joseph Seybold.
James Cummins, Joseph F. Pau l.
Allen Brock. Henry Uleberson,
Gibson Lamb.
Interest paid on special deposits.
Issues drafts on England Ireland an
BruimnS JuSKl'll BfalYBoLO.
lathed Casni^r.
WHEELING TITLE AND TRUST CO,,
1315 MARKET STREET.
General Banking.
Safe Deposit Vault. .._
Real Estate Title Insurance.
Interest paid on special deposits
anu savings accounts.
H. M. RUSSELL. L. F. 8TIFEL,
President. Secretary.
C. J. KAWLING. WM. H. TRACT.
Vice President. Ass’t Secretary.
G. E. GILCHRIST. Examiner of Titles.
National bank of w. va.
AT WHEELING.
CAPITAL . J200,000
Southwest Corner Main and Twelfth St*.
Docs a General Banking Business.
DIRECTORS -August Rolf, R. T. De
vries. E. W. Oglebay, John Wagner, R.
W. Hazlctt, J. R. McCourtney. E. B.
Potts.
Earl W. Oglebay, President.
J. R. McCourtney, Vice President
John Wagner. Cashier.
DANK OF THE OHIO VALLEY
State and City Depository.
Stockholder* Doubly Liable.
CAPITAL . JITS.OOO
Government and lo<al bonds bought and
sold. Drafts issued on any point in Eu
rope, a» well as on the principal cities of
the United States. A general banking bus
iness transacted.
WM. A. ISETT. President.
M. POLLOCK. Vice President.
J. A. MILLER,jCaahjer.
PLUMBERS.
UL. M’KOWN.
• Plumbing. Gas and Steam Fitting
Gasoline and Oils of all kinds. Sewer Pipe,
etc. 1911 Market atreet. Wneeling. W. Va.
Telephone 104. Estimates furnished.
‘•Jllto
James C. UuwbUltr. Joa'-ph Lot*.
MANSBAR6ER & LOTZ,
-PRACTICAL
PLUMBERS, GAS <£ STEAM FITTERS,
No. 3: Twelfth Street. Wheeling.
Estimate! furnished. Ail work done at
reasonable prices.
KTOTICE TO NATURAL GAS
< o.vsrwEits.
The “H.bberd Catorlflc Natural Gas
Burner" u the only burner In the market
that 1* guaranteed to give satisfaction,
lie not deceived In accepting *‘Ju#t aj
good" with do guarantee.
For sale by all plumbers.
GEO. HIPRKRD A FON.
__1314 Market Street.
WM. HARE A SON,
“▼ —PRACTICAL—
Plumbers, (ias & Steam Fitters.
NO. 53 TWELFTH STREET.
All work dooe promptly at reasonable
prices.
SUPPLY HGUSE.
PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING,
STEAM AND
HOT WATER HEATING.
A full line of the celebrated
SNOW STEAM PUMPS
Kept constantly or. hand.
1500 and - M irket Street, Wheeling.
DUNK LEGAL FORMS
Of every description. Good paper. goo4
printing, fair pncaa. Wort dc you n«*d7
Look it up and send an jrder to the
WEST VIRGINIA PRINTING CO. . 1
\
FOR RENT.
FOR RENT—Dwelling house on Chaplin*
street. North of Eleventh street. No. KHfc
Apply GEO. DUSCH, 10(2 Market street.
auTedh.
FOR RENT—A pood situated farm of 71
acres, on Caldwell’s run. 3** miles from
the city. House, bam and stable In best
condition. Good water, two orchards,
with plenty of fine fruit. Inquire of
MRS. LOHMA.V, Sherrard. TV. Va..
a u 14et a
FOR RENT. Stl
fronting 67 feet on data street and 2)) feet
on Tcath street. JtHES. L HiWLEY,
Real Estate and Lnaa A»ent,
ICiS Maia street
“FOR RENT.
Storeroom No. 1037 Market street.
No. 732 Main St., 6 rooms and bath.
No. 103 17th St, 3 rooms and attic.
No. 906 Market St., 3 rooms.
Office room. cor. 12th and Chapline Sts.
Rooms over 1141 Main street.
(iEO. J. MATHISON,
Real Estate Agtnt
Telephone 107. 130$ Market street
FOR SALE-REAL ESTATE._
SPECIAL BARGAINS
>3.000 buys lot .30x100. The only desirable
lot left on Fifteenth street; worth >4 100.
JivOuO buys brick resident . T. n rooms,
hall. both, both gases*, hot and cold wat^r.
Ix*t 30x100; chiaj* at JS.ns), on Fifteenth
street.
ROI.F & ZAN'E.
_ N ' "> I'"
POR SALE—AT A BARGAIN.
Farm of 225 acres near Ravenswood. \T.
v.i. rt of w
Dwelling House of 7 rooms, tenant house,
barn and orchard, well watered. In
quire of Samuel West on the premise* oa
W. V. HOQE,
Room IS. City Rank Building.
Fiblic sale op north
MARKET STREET PROPERTY.
In order to close the estate of the 1st*
Patrick Kenney, deceased, the following
property will hr off (.red at public sale at
the front door* of the t’ourt House of Ohio
County on Saturday morning. September
the 1th. 1V*7. at ton o'clock: One two-*tory
brick dwelling with basement, fronting
on the west aide of Market, between Fifth
and Sixth streets. A.so one two-story
brick dwelling on the tame lot. fronting
on Alley 1). The <nme will be offer 1 as a
whole or in two part*, to suit purcha»er.
J. J. KENNEY,
Admr. of 1\ Kenney, dec'd.
J. C. HERVKY,
Auctioneer. auGel
Special Sale of Realty.
- l I ■ ■ —
A choice piece of r*nl estate !« offeted
for sale, being the property known us No.
D23, on tiie west (tide of Main street, tie
tweeiPNInth and Tenth tr< t consisting
of a two-e'ory brick dwelling of nine <>
rooms, bath room, laundry and C‘><><1 i
lap; Including u water (liter In laundry
supplying clear watei t r all hou ehold
purposes, together with lot about 30 feet
front hi.cl extending to the Ohio river; All
modern improvements; in the heel of ..r
•1. r and condition; corner of alley; side
entrance; house wired f..r electric lights
ai«o both g Price very r< Laooawti
terms easy.
RINEHART & TATU
TELEPHONE 2P Clrv IHVk Hlil.OIN)
I TRUSTEES SALE OF \
BLE CITY PMOPE
virtue of 1
P. J >. Carrol and C. <’.
to John J Ju< "o, ti . .Ml
A. i» . 1883, and recorded in tfl
the clerk of tin- County Coui*
County, in D< dot i r u t Book nuniT5ff
..n oider tntind in tn«
Circuit •’ourt of Ohio County, on the 2Jd
day of July. A. D., 1vj7. appointing the un
dcr signed trust* e. in ill ace of the said J.'hn
J. Jacob, now deceased, 1 will sell at the
north front door of the Court House of
OIBo County, on
SATURDAY, THE 2RTII PAY' OF AUG
UST. A. D.. 1SI)7.
commencing at It) oVn* k a. m., the fol
lowing described property:
To-wit: That portion of the lot or por
tion of ground, in the city of Wheeling,
West Virginia, lying at near th** point
of lnier*eoilon of John (now Sixteenth and
South street) will h is wesi of a foundation
1 wall, running from the Sixteenth Jin** to
the line of South street, through the hulld
| Ing occupied by S.ttnu* I Nesbitt as a black
smith shop, and hounded iin follows: Be
ginning a: tii*> point of lnt< rst-ctlon of
Sixteenth itr.-v and South str- et In souaiw ,
nirnh.red tight <*). In that p>i
city; thence running eastwardly along the
Hi,.- of Blxtssoth trest, thlrty-om
to the center of the foundation wall above
referred to; thenc* running along th- c*n
allel with the line of Market Htr.et, south- ■
wardly to the line of South street; thence ■
w*«twnrxVy along the lino of Sou:h str**l ■
to the place of I
all the appurtenance* anil• hereditaments ■
thereunto belonging, or in any wire upper- ■
Mg 1
TF.HMR OF HADE-One-third of th*
pure hast mone) ► i non s
purchaser may elect to pay cash on :<>'
'
twelve months, with IntcreM from o >y or *,
sale, the title to be conveyed to th. pur
chaser, he giving n d< «*d of trust on t:e
property to secure the d«f«-rr*d payments.
T. 8. HI IVEY,
Jy27ej TiU -
REAL ESTATE AND STOCKS.
ALFRED PAULL. FRANK P.
ALFRED PADLL & CO,.
Real Estate, Stocks, BoiJs ail Investaecii,
NO. 1UI> MARKET STREET /
DR /
ii v I I
For 75c would be cheap, ^K|
but not sj cheap .. . . H|
Fall Weight Jackets^
AF.Si, 00 EACH.
We are selling our entire stock
of Black, Navy and Tan Jack
ets for Ladies, carried over
from last season, at $1.00 ^
each. Nothing more useful
than a Light Weight Jacket
these cool Jays. Call ear;/,
before the assortment
broken.
J.S.Rkodesj^2i

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