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Wheeling register. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1878-1935, December 25, 1902, LAST EDITION, Image 5

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We Eztcnd to Aik Our Patrons Our Best Wishes For
OUTFITTING COMPANY
gSI
asm
mv
m
OCIETY.
V.
Entertainments,
Wedi
Etc.
j
Miss Gertrude Paxton gave a box
party at the Court Theatre last even
ing to see “The New Clown." In the
party were Misses Stella Hubbard,
Anna Hubbard, Isabelle Dalzell, Au
gusta Hearne, Margaret Cummins,
Mesbrs. Charles Paxton, Jack Culbert
son, Mertz Franzheim, Singleton Pauli,
Hal Russell. Mrs. Francis Paxton
chaperoned the party.
4> 4* ^
Copies of the following notices were
issued yesterday:
Mr. and Mrs. A. Reymann,
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Stifel,
At Home
Tuesday evening. January sixth,
from eight until twelve o’clock
Number twenty-nine Fifteenth street.
Wheeling, West Virginia.
4* 41 4*
The Christmas dance of Miss Flem
ing's class will be given Friday night
at the Arion, instead of the Carroll
Club.
«{• 4,
Councilman John Ochsenkuhn and
wife are spending Christmas with
friends in East Liverpool. They will
return next Monday.
i|i
At the Carroll Club Auditorium this
evening, the Queen and Bidawee danc
ing academies unite in giving a special
dance party. The hall will be decorat
HAVE YOU CONSIDERED
Buying a Piano for Christmas? If so, it will
pay you to see our goods before deciding the
matter.
OUR PIANOS ARE OF THE BEST MAKES.
OUR PRICES AND TERMS ARE RIGHT.
We guarantee you 100 cents’ worth of Piano
for every dollar you pay us.
F. W. BAUMER CO.,
1310 MARKET STREET,
The Only One-Price Piano House in the State.
TALKING MACHINES, REGINA MUSIC BOXES, GUITARS,
VIOLINS, MANDOLINS. BANJOS—EVERYTHING MUSICAL AT
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES;
HEVMAN DUOS,
«e93»0o
l
f i
one: price to all.
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HEYMAN BROS.
Extend to the public their
best wishes for : : : : :
Very
Merry
Christmas
99 9 ©9 99 9 all goods (’marked an plain figures, j
ed and a merry throng of dancers is as
sured.
Table d’htaM(MiMMfc»at the Virginia
Caterinf Co. to-^^^5jprtW*(b 2 p. m.
None better
JOHN S. ROBINSON
SERIOUSLY ILL.
Word was received here yesterday
that Hon. John S. Robinson was in a
dying condition.
Mr. Robinson was born and raised
here, was admitted to the bar and
practiced for a short time. In the lat- j
| ter 80’s he left Wheeling and located in
Nebraska, where he has been the recip
ient of several positions of trust, be
ing elected judge and later represented
his district in Congress as a Democrat.
His many friends will regret to hear of
his serious illness.
John Robinson was a native of the
First ward of this city and went to
school there under Prof. Bundy, in the
latter seventies, with a number of peo
ple long since prominent, among them
being John Sweeney, Julia Garden, Cap.
Marshall, Bob Phillips, James Stuart,
and
Try
Tom & Jerry
ANOTHER MEETING OF
UNION LABEL LEAGUE.
& The Union Label League which was
i successfully launched last Thursday
night, with a large attendance, elected
| Mrs. Emma Brooks president. Presi
i dent Brooks is endeavoring to have
another meeting before the first of Jan
uary, but has not selected the date.
I BRIDGEPORT. |
Mrs. Harry Pendleton, of Pittsburg,
is here.
Will Bowen, of Wellsville, is spend
1 ing the day with friends.
Miss Mary «Donahey is spending sev
eral days at Buffalo, N. Y.
M. Gallagher, of Mt. Pleasant, spent
Wednesday with friends here.
Both banks will remain closed to
day on account of Christmas.
The Aetna-Standard mill has shut
down for the rest of the week.
Park Alexander is home from Har
vard College to spend the holidays.
Rev. and Mrs. J. S. Secrest are spend
ing Xmas with relatives at Scio, 0.
0. Duncan has purchased the saloon
formerly conducted by Herbert Slosser.
The postoffice will be open to-day
from S to 10 a. m. and from 6 to 7 p. m.
Charles Neuhart is spending the day
with his parents at Lewisville, Monroe
county.
A large crowd attended the Knights
of Pythias dance at the Opera House
last evening.
Invitations are out for a reception
by Mrs. J. E. Waters on the afternoon ,
of December 29th.
The barbers had their places of busi- j
ness open last night until ten o'clock. :
Shops close to-day at noon.
Samuel Reed, of Newport. Ky., was
here yesterday to attend the funeral of
his father, the late Samuel Reed.
The Young Ladies Euchre Club will
be entertained at the home of Mrs.
Waters, in Kirkwood, Friday evening, j
January 2d.
‘^he wrecking ere
was at Maynard
away the
at that
The
!., L. & W.
.clearing
wreck
LAFE BOWEN SHOT.
WHILE TRYING TO
ARREST BAD NEGRO
Brave Officer Is Lying at Death’s Door In j
City Hospital From Bullet Wounds j
Inflicted.
CowardlyShots From Noah
Ross’ Revolver Mortally
Wounds Him But Nervy
Officer Pusued Negro
UNTIL EXHAUSTED
Negro Caught After Hard
Chase and Arrested at
Point of Gun Two Miles
In Rear of Bridgeport.
HE IS IN JAIL HERE
Police Officer S. L. Bowen, better
known as “Late,” was fatally shot by
a negro named Noah Ross in the Sec
ond ward, about eleven o’clock yester
day morning.
The shooting was unprovoked, ac
cording to all the information obtain
able, and was done while the officer
was placing the negro under arrest.
Bowen displayed remarkable nerve,
following the negro for a block, and
only giving up the pursuit when he fell
exhausted from loss of blood.
Ross fled across the Island to Bridge
port, through that town to the Cadiz
pike, and was stopped by a farmer who
leveled a shot gun at him. He was
brought back to Wheeling by detective
Jerry O’Leary and Officer Bob Driscoll.
He is now In jail under commitment
by justice of the peace M. J. Fitzpat
rick.
The shooting created a great deal of
excitement at the time, and some ugly
threats against the prisoner were made,
but when the passion of the people
cooled, there was a general willingness
to allow the law to take is course.
Where it Occurred.
The shooting occurred in the repair
shop on the west side of Market square,
conducted by August Freibertshauser.
Ross had been with two negro compan
ions during the morning, but went into
Freibertshauser’s alone, and there ex
hibited a revolver, which was without
a hammer, and asked to have It repair
ed. He had been under surveillance by
Bowen, and when he displayed the gun,
the officer entered the store, and noti
fied him that he was under arrest. Ross
said he would not be taken. The offi
cer threw back Ross’ coat, and dis
closed a revolver protruding froina vest
pocket. He reached for his club, and
siarted to take his prisoner.
Ross at the same time reached
around to his hip pocket, and pulled
out another 32 calibre revolver, which
he pointed at Bowen, and fired three
times. Two of the shots took effect,
the third going wild. Ross stepped
back with each shot that he fired.
Bowen still had his club with which he
struck at Ross when they reached the
sidewalk.
Hattie Johnson, a well known color
Special
Sale.
worth of
DIAMONDS,
WATCHES,
JEWELRY, etc
•)
This week we place on sale 175,000 worth of
Diamonds. Watches, Jewelry, Silverware, etc.,
at from 10 to 25 per cent, less than regular
prices. This sale is for the benefit of the
early buyers, and our customers will find it
to their interest to take advantage of same.
SHEFF BROS..
Jewelers, corner Main and Eleventh Sts.

ed woman was there. Ross in some
manner pushed her so that the blow in- j
tended for him, fell with terrific force
upon her arm. It was reported that
her arm was fractured, but waile the
blow was so severe that she is carry
ing the memter in a sling, ao bones
were broken.
Flight of Ross.
Ross took to his heels, running up
Market street to the alley, west in the
alley to Main street, and thence across
the bridge to the Island. Bowen, not
withstanding his wounds, gave pursuit.
The nerve which has characterized lbs
service ever since he has been on the
force, was put to a severe test; but did
not fail him. He fired one shot at
the retreating negro. His coolness
and self-possession were remarkable.
He was bleeding as he ran, and a by
stander urged him to shoot the negro.
“Crowd- too- big” was the falter
ing response of the brave officer, who
was not unmindful of the safety of
others.
He could not overtake the fugitive
negro. He had knocked the revolver
from his hand with his club, and it was
afterwards picked up by D. Z. Phillips,
who turned it over to the police. Bowen
reached the cigar store adjoining the
office of the Wheeling Traction Com
pany. Here he sank exhausted, tell
ing those who crowded around him that
he was 6hot. To one of the officers
■who came he said: “I would have got
him if it had not been for the crowd.”
Bowen was made as comfortable as
possible until the arrival of the ambu
lance, in which he was removed to the
City hospital.
An Eye Witness.
Special Officer Ben’j. Dunlap was an
! eye-witness of what took place on the
; streets and in the alley. He said to a
i Register reporter:
“I was standing in the Market house,
| near the division between the two
buildings, when the shooting occurred
in Freibertshausers. I had seen Bowen
seceral times during the morning, and
j he appeared to be looking for some
body. Three shots were fired inside
J the building, but I paid no especial at
tention to them, because they repair
guns and revolvers there and often test
them. But immediately after the third
shot three negroes ran from the build
ing and started north towards Market
alley, with Bowen in pursuit. He
had been shot in the face, but was
game. The negroes turned west up
the alley, which was filled with people,
it being market morning, and as they
ran a team was coming east from Main
street to Market.
“As Bowen ran, after turning into the
alley, he threw his club after one of
the men, but missed him and struck
Hattie Johnson on the arm. Then the 1
officer, still running, drew his revol- 1
ver and fired one shot, but It went ;
wild. He was evidently afraid to fire
again, lest he hit some innocent per
son. He ran as far as the cigar store,
on the corner of Main street and Bridge
Place and there he was compelled to
give up. Just as the men passed up
the alley a woman picked up a revol
ver, lying close by the Stone & Thomas j
building, and said: T guess that be- j
longs to the officer.’ It did not. how
ever, for it had not been discharged, it
containing five cartridges. It had
been dropped or thrown aw'ay by one
of the two negroes who were with the
man who did the shooting.”
THE FUGITIVE CAUGHT
WEST OF BRIDGEPORT.
An Exciting Chase Over the Island and
Through Bridgeport—Struck Officer
Who Tried to Stop Him.
The negro Ross is of athletic build,
and his fear appeared to accelerate his
speed. He ran past the toll collector
on the steel bridge and crossed the Is
land at full speed. As he reached toll
collector Richardson, on the back river
bridge, he threw out a dime.
Policeman John Moore, of Martin’s
Ferry, was at the end of the bridge, and
made a grab for Ross. The negro
struck him in the face, and continued
running. Moore fired a shot after him,
which struck him on the heel, but did
not penetrate his foot Moore followed
and was joined by Bert McConnaughy,
Clair Murdock and Hiram Jones, all of
Bridgeport. The fleeing negro turned
out the Cadiz pike, and continued in the
direction of Upland, west of Bridge
port.
Meanwhile the news of the shooting
had spread through Wheeling like wild
fire. From police headquarters tele
phone messages were sent to Bridge
port, and to all points west of that ci»y.
One reached the old Reed nursery, and
Will Cook, a farmer living there, se
cured a shot gun, and awaited the ap
proach of the negro. When he reach
ed the home of Thomas Hill, Cook
stepped out on the road in front of him,
levelled the gun at his face and com
manded him to throw up his hands
Ross did so, reluctantly. The Bridge
port posse came up about this time and
also Detective O’Leary^ and Officer
Driscoll in a buggy. They took pos
session of the negro, and drove hack to
Wheeling with him, taking him to pc-'
lice headquarters where he was interro
gated in the private office of the chief,
and later committed to jail without
bond by Justice M. J. Fitzpatrick.
ROSS CLAIMS THAT HE
SHOT IN SELF-DEFENSE.
Tells His Story of the Shooting to a Reg
ister Reporter From His Cell in the
Jail.
When Ross was placed in jail, he
threw himself on his cot and went to
sleep. He was awakened about five
o’clock when a Register reporter se
cured his story of the shooting. Ross
said he was 23 years of age on the 10th
of last month. He was born and rear
ed in Pennsylvania, but has lived in
Bridgeport for about fourteen months.
He worked as a hod carrier for Butts,
Perkins and other contractors, and was
last employed, he said, by Sam Nesbitt,
on work near the lower market houre.
He is a little below average stature,
yellow in color, with scarred face, and
broad flat nose. His appearance is the
reverse of prepossessing. He tried to
make it appear that he acted in self
defense.
“I came over to town this morning,”
he said, "and I only had one drink, at
at Frobe’s. I was walking up through
the market house when the policeman
asked me what I was doing there. 1
told him I wasn’t doin’ nothing. He
asked me if I wanted to buy a noth
ing, and I told him I didn't. I di#n’t
give him no name. He told me I’d
better go across the river where I be
longed, and I told him I hadn’t done
nothing, and wasn’t bothering nobody.
“I knowed he was watchin’ me when
I went into the store to get a hammer
on my revolver that I was carryin' in
my vest pocket. If I could have got
out the back way, I would have run.
and if I could have got past him I
would have gone out the front door,
but I was in a tight place. Just as he
had his club raised the third time, I
pulled out my revolver from my back
pocket and shot him.”
The remainder of the story corro
borates the version given above. When
Cook pointed the rifle at him, he says
that he could not raise the one arm that
was struck with Bowen’s club, on ac
count of the pain it caused him.
CONDITION OF BOWEN
AT THE CITY HOSPITAL
Is Very Grave With Slight Changes for ,
Recovery—Resting Easy Early This I
Morning.
The wounded officer was at once tak- I
en to the city hospital, where several
physicians attended him, among them
Drs. Schwinn, Noome, Jepsoa, Heed,
Myers, and Hupp. He was conscious
all the while that the physicians were
working with him, save when he was
under the influence of the anesthetic,
and was perfectly rational. To Cljeif
Ritz, who was at his bedside for some
time, he said cheerfully: “You’ll see
me through this all right, won't ycu
captain?"
One of Ross’ bullets entered his face
at the nose, and lodged in the muscles
in the back of the neck. Ne effort
was made to locate this, as it would
hardly prove fatal. The other entered
the interior wall of the stomach, and
passed through the lesser curvature. It
was not considered advisable to trace
the bullet yesterday. The exact re
sult of the injury may not be known
for several days, as the physicians an
ticipate peritonitis. Early this morn
ing a telephone message from the hos
pital conveyed the information that the
patient is resting easily.
Bowen is one of the most popular
officers on the force, as well as one of
the bravest and most efficient. In the
Second ward he has been looked upon
as a “negro hater,” and it is said that
several men have threatened to “do"
him before he went off the force. He has
shown no fear whatever in dealing with
the criminal element, and his ability to
handle himself as well as his personal
bravery, made it impossible to bring
him down in any other manner than
through such a cowardly method as was
employed by the negro Ross. Before
going on the force, he was a mot.orman
on the Wheeling & Elm Grove line
He was married about fourteen months
ago to Minnie Myers, sister of Dr. i
Myers. He is the father of one child,
an infant.
The present police force has betn
peculiarly unfortunate in having to
deal with such cases as that of yes
terday. It will be remembered that
Officer O'Keefe was compellei to shoot, j
a man in self-defense in the Second
ward, and the duel with the Pan Han
die safe crackers, in which Ed. Ken
nedy was killed ,1s still fresh in the t
memory of the public.
Accurate eye testing. C. E Seybold,
optician at Chas. N. Hancher's.
WAGNER WITHDREW FROM
CONTEST FOR MAYORALITY.
H. C. Wagner withdrew from the race
for Mayor last evening in Fulton and
has anonunced himself as a candidate
tor recorder. There were formerly
three candidates in the field but Wag
ner's withdrawal leaves only two oth- )
era now who are Michael Stein and
Jacob Tilton The announcement of
bis withdrawal from the field caused
considerable regret on the part of j
Wagner's friends who were patting
forth every effort and straining every
muscle to secure his election at the
primaries.
0
MRS. CARL SCHULTZ DIED
FROM BURNS
In the Gas Explosion at Her Home
terday Morning—Extent of Her
juries.
Mrs. Carl Schultz, who was burned
the explosion at her home yesterdn]
morning, succumbed to lief injuries^
11:30 o'clock last night. After ar
animation of the wounds of Hj
Schultz, the hospital authorities not
fled her husband that the extent of herl
burns were incompatible with recovery]
Her burns extended over seven-tenths
of the surface, and it is seldom a per-'
son recovers when more than two-fiftha
of the surface is burned.
e finest!
aterins
Slain streets.
Nog and
Take y
place in tlie clt
Co., cor. Ninth
Try Bad _
Toni l*f Tu'i' l" hi Lilmas.
tuts.
MME. BALENZA RELEASED.
BUENOS AYRES, Deo. 24,-Mme.
Balen/.a, who was arrested on her ar
rival here yesterday from France, waij
released to-day.
Accurate eye testing. C. E. Seyl
optician at Chas N. Rancher's.
BOYS MEE*CY DEATlfc •
AKRON, O.. Dee. 24.—Roy and H
Smith, agend 9 and 11 years, res
tively, were drowned while skating
a pond here to-day.

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