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Wheeling Sunday register. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1882-1934, August 09, 1896, Image 7

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• >r J. 11. Lippincott.
■ : i- J >
PHARD III. r,E
. RT<\\1.
• i NOONTROYER
v ri .N'S up v-\
' KPER.
• a tr personal
III. This great
muo •. has been
m is ly cun.—
• Ca. k\ Octo
-sm-j of his
:: w': • naat?
d ;> treach
Richard, ,
N< v:.'.
heir to
. U '.nab •
L'uke of Yo.k.
Tower a few days later, but It is not
kn wn to be a fact.
R hard was attained and outlawed
by Parliament at one time; but he was
c ireful about what he ate. and didn’t
g t . s feet wet. so. at last, having a
gaii preamble and constitution, he
pulled through.
He married his own cousin,
Anne Neville, who made a
firs>rate queen. She got so that
it was no trouble a: all for her to
r gi> while Dick was away attending to
his large slaughtering interests.
Richard at this time was made Lord
H >: Constable, and Keeper of the
1 ■!. Hr was also Justiciary of
X r a Wales. Senes lial of the Duchy
■ !. r. and Chief of Police on the
.V . tk Side,
IPs brother Clarence was success
fully execut' d for f-.'oa in February.
! ITS. md Richard, without a moment’s
■ the front and in
t • i -he es’ates.
R hard had a stormy time of it up to
. u u- was made “protector and
ft ad-1 ft he i • aim” early in May. H s
Till: M.V RRI.VGE._~
>>r.f ' t ry
- '1... t? k . 1
I
Ti is Ms: was headed—or
• : h ukd—by Lord Chamber- :
Hastings, who tendered his resig
. . of saw-dust soon after
K . .:\\ a...ue "protector a:ul defen d -
i .n." Richard laid c.aim to
n? in June, on the grounds of
si ix.tcy of his nephews, and
•v • <: July •>. So was his
Ti. > -a ..n this throne for
. and each had ' sceptre with
a. it th* ir subjects over the
i. p off .he ti -s in summer.
. • a sceptre longer
>r. it is said, than any ether
- a■ iy.t m:nar h known -o his
. .. • .r me used by Richard is
x;.---.;, e. and has an aperture
’.a -om< very oi l gin.
T;. r- )t- th s gin was left, it is
wa» ...... .... was sudden.y called
V SA. - N W.V. !:i NE FOR SOME TIME.
: i vor !:ve4
_ - ; k. No m nurch should ever
!• :> i s t luj mucu of a
r . - very unpopu
• . they
.... a system of assessing a
.• r 1 .■ k :h a coking
k : ■ head"
... -. „ fT. -A .;}•!.r. whi h was
• vt ah ag ta«. day. and
a . - a :i; the ear by the
nightfall. It was a
ti
-
at tit* same t5au.
. . a 14SS, and ...
' 1"K . U SRC< N". MARRIAGE.
---•-r. H VI., a ;h
* .ng .... dr : but
v .s. v. . - rr- -;> n w :>
a : ~ y. wr. • iru •• and ’-dgraphed
• > i . r the lady was and all
- 1 • . K.cr.a. i « r., and
' - . a.? ..r.d ... out :r..i rrytn?,
- IS s
it 1 > and get killed
Aug :it.
After v $ it was found that he
--- rol’c-d up a - pantaloons above h.s
knees, so that he would not get gore
on them. This custom was afterwards
generally adopted in England.
He was buried by the nuns of Lei
cester in their chapel, Richmond then
succeeding him as king. He was buried
in the usual manner, and a large amount
of obloquy heaped on him.
That is one advantage of being great.
After one’s grave is tilled up. one can
have a large three-cornerod chunk of
obloquy put on the top of it to mark
the spot and keep medical students
away of nights.
Greatness certainly has its draw
backs, as the Duchess of Bloomer once
said to the author, after she had been
sitting on a dry goods box with a nail
in it, and had, therefore, called forth
adverse criticism. An unknown man
might have sat on the same dry g oods
box and hung on the same nail til! he
was biack in the Hue without causing
remarks, but with the Duchess of
Bloomer it was different—ch, so differ
ent!
(To be Continued.)
-o
CLARKSBURG.
Clarksburg, AV. Yu., August 8.—'Just
at present everything is quiet in
Clarksburg. The peuple have suffered
some from th recent severe Hoods, and
while the oats in same instances are
badly injured, and e grass -
v ’ during the past few clear and exces
sively wat m farmers espi si
aliy ha\e embraced the golden oppor
tunity to su\ what crop;? they could,
an 1 have put up a good deal of grass
and oats, and threshed considerable
wheat. The Clarksburg Land and Im
provement Company alone cn the farm
it ret- litly purchase, d of M. AY. Smith,
saved iit ' - 't hundred bushels cf wheat,
n- withstanding the mo.-a or th time
th- re was wet weather, and the most
'i ii ;u- is. T:ie
company, now that the wheat is cut and
threshed, are having the farm laid off
in lots, which will b^ placed on the
market and it is expecti 1 early in S p
tember to Lave a great drawing for io
cs: • ion of lots. Already several proposi
tions are under consideration for the
location of manufacturing plants in! the
u- vv town, among which, most prowli
n' nt. is that of one for the manufacture
of furniture ..ml which will be lo
coed right in the centre of the poplar
and Lynn timber field within but a
s' me's throw. Ararngemnts are being
made for the opera' on of a mammoth
coal mine, which of its If, will g.ve
lab r to fifty families, l’olitics ar laid
..sick— What the people want is plenty
of money—-Coin it fne and unlimited;
give us an abund&nci of money, paper,
silver and gold—none of it is r fused
up here, and there is great demand for
any kind. These industries will put
hundreds of cur p -opt- :n a position
•o get the men-y, :.-nd -b. already de
serving town of Clarksburg is on the
verge of the gr ates bus ness prospects
that could be antioipa.ed.
kinds of improvements are rush
ing forward, and our enterprising
. . R. F. 1. wn 3, has orn
down the old stone house cn Main
street, a landmark for more than a ten
ure. and will in i\s stead erect a mrg
r fie iu brick edifice, which v.dll add
g: ally to the appearance of Third
s et. Stvetal new brick yards have
be-n started, and with gas, both natural
and artificial, bituminous coal of an x
cdlent quality, electricity, a fine water
riant, and other modern facilities,
Clarksburg at no dis '.nt dry will take
her place as a city of West A'irginia,
second to but one. and that Who ling.
-o
FA I RM XT.
Faimicir. W. Va.. August S. Mill
Jill krtt. of Dubois. Pa., was in town Iasi
\V. Inesday.
prof. C. w. Flesh r returned Satur
day iron: the center of the state, where
h has be n holding ins: tutes.
M:ss Paulina Smith, of Uniontown. :s
. . - f hei H F. Sn ' :
v \ 1' and Ella eth
wl’sor. and Mr. Alh t Watson spent
\V ’r slav aftern .n a: Monongah.
\ . . : Ml W. S. M h hav
r urned from a trip to Atlantic C.tv.
John W. Ross and lit'!* hutah.- r. of
M . agah, were in Ft rmon W n< --
day.
Mrs. H. G. P w’.hs and Mrs. A. J.
ft Saturday
for Atlantic City. I
Mrs. Will Prick, t. of Dubois. Pm :s
:h> gut st of her fath- r-in-hrv. Mr. W.il- :
jam Pr.sk'.tt. sr.. at Baruesville.
Mbs Rjsc Dorsey, who has been the
guest of relatives k to and ot Gas.on,
h •; r urr.' 1 ;■> her he,:. ..i \\ • ■ ..ng.
Miss Gra Pick i - •
to Grafton one day last we- k.
Mrs. J. Engle entertained a numb- r
o* la-lies oil Fri lay night at an "old
; 4 over sixty jis of fit . i .:e affair
a f Mrs Eng s guest,
Mrs. W. W. Cline, of War-Fang.
v • lred and :. M - m
*own prop'.- and about two hundred
ball
g. me a: this place yesterday.
Sam Iscmaa is buyii g Is.
V. Lou • r New
Cumb-rlaud.
Mis- Minn: Engl- entertained a
I number of gues's at h- r home
on the South Sid.- Tu.. lay night
:• h :::or of h-r gu - M -s AB.
: f W . Miss 1 ray
la of
th-- evening was c-nj yaldy spent in
gan -
,ii p t _ ram me was r : 1 red and re
- • served se present were
M - M.iud Musgiovc. H an1 Z t>
!. -lib. Grai B: thrum. Grace Pi-k-:t.
F;na Elliott, Edna Trick 't. X tlie
tn W 11a McCra: nd M i • En
g ii. of G: • r. county. Pa., and Messrs.
■ • .. Ttnnig Rich S
Walter Boy i> on. Pr. f E. E. Mercer,
iiioa 1 K M • rb. O'ieII P. Me Kill
u v and Waiter v oun.
Mrs. S. L. Wat.-'n =■ in Mountain
I. k. Pa:k. wh-.i- sh-. will remain s.ir.e
time.
• „»:
. - **bi W is r -
i 10 Ms Pennsylvania hvnsv.
- - - mis
guest cl s ■ Mrs. Alexand r,
h is r- to L r 1. il-. In Morgan
town.
i>rof \ l. Wade, of Morgan'own.
n Fairn t T1 le was re
turning from a visit to Charts .on.
Parid Lewis, v. ho nns c-.en anicted
«’! winter bv rheumatism, is out ag..ia
aml aii due to the medicines ad
vor-;*ed in our columns. After trying
pvervthing possible he used Charaber
la*u*s Pain Bairn, ^ *lnh ha* relieved
Mm of all pain- from he was a
constant sufferer and premises to
make him tit for duty soon. We know
David has been a great sufferer and
are"clad to see him around again. Fcr
bv Charles R. Goe’ze. 'V. W. !r
;lr j\ K’ari. William E. Williams, C.
Menkemeller. William H. Hague. H
r Stewart. A. E. Scheele. J. Coleman.
(/ Sehnepf. Williim Menkemeller.
Wheeling: Howie & Co.. Bridgeport;
i\ F. Peobody £ Son, Benwood.
n iw m i
< >B
Nahan Srasbrg's Mission.
BY WILLIAM MURRAY GRAYDON.
Copyrighted, 1S%, By William Murray
Graydon.
(Continued.)
CHAPTER Yir.
“In Which Godfrey Pleads for the Con
demned Prisoners.
Without waiting for an answer Bar
nabas jerked the table away and swung
the door partly open. The enemy were
■ m* the watch, and immediately opened
a hot fire. Two bullets struck Reuben
Attwocd. and he fell dead across the
threshold. The others dodged back in
to the heat and smoke, and just a: that
critic.:! moment the firing ceased in re
sponse to a loud command.
z"k's the Tory colonel hisself.” ex
claimed Barnabas, as he peeped
through a crevice. “He’s just arrived,
an’ there’s a lot outlie Royal Greens
along with him.
"Colonel Butler,” he added loudly,
we'll surrender pervidin’ you spare our
lives.”
"Come out first, and the:* we’ll talk,”
he clllccr shouted back after a brief
pause.
There was hope in the words, and
Barnabas and his companions lest no
time in scrambling to their feet. Half
[ choked and sweating from every pore,
h y stepped over Attwood’s dead body
and .daggering across the clearing. At
•dght of the three figures there was a
| loud murmur of astonishment.
"Where's tin rest?” demanded Simon
Glass, as he roughly stripped the pris
oners of their muskets.
"We're all k re but one,” Barnabas an
| swore 1, pointing to the doorway, "an’
I he’s dead.”
"I’ll send you to join him.” snarled
' Glass, and wi.h that he presented a gun
VO Ik old man’s head. But before he
could fire Colonel Butler knocked the
weapon aside. "You ruffun!"he ex
claimed. "would you shoot a prisoner in
cold blood?”
"He deserves it,” remonstrated Glass
in an injured tone. "Why. this is the
leader of the rebel band that attack? 1
ray party a couple of days ago, killed
four of us anJ smle our horses."
"! have notl ing to d > with that af
n< 1 ! tu ler. “Wh a !
“You rebel do?,’’ he cried, “do you dare
to assert that I cannot enforce my own
commands? But enough! Captain
Caldwell, a platoon of your men, please.
S:and the prisoners out and shoot
them.”
Nathan turned pale. Baranbas and j
"McNichol heard the sentence without
moving a muscle. A file of the Royal
Greens stepped forward, bringing th :r
musket butts to earth with a dull clat
ter. But just as several Tories laid hold
of the victims to place them iu position
an unexpected interference came fromi
Godfrev Spencer.
•Colonel Butler,” he exclaimed, "let me
speak to you before this goes any far
ther.”
“Stop, you fool!” muttered Glass, try
ing to push the lad back.
-Let me go." Godfrey whispered fierce
ly. If you don’t I'll tel! all."
“What do ycu want to say?” asked
Colonel Butler. ‘Oh, it's you, Lieuten
ant Spencer!”
“Sir. I beg you to spare tnese men,
pleaded Godfrey. ‘With justice to your
self you can waive th? question of their
hearing'arais, since their object in com
ing to the cabin to-night was in nowise
contrary to tej-ms of the surrender. We
came for the same purpose, and the
meeting was purely accidental. Simon
Glass has lied deliberately, and 1 can
vouch for it that he would have shot
the prisoners at once had they given
the mselves up.”
Glass ground his tee’h with rage, and
had looks been able to kill, the brave lad
must have fallen dead.
“I don’t understand this hurled march
of your little detachment from the Jer
sies to Wyoming,” replied Colonel But
ler. “You told me you were sent by
Major Langdon, and now I infer that
this cabin was connected with your mis
sion; also that the prisoners marched
from' the Jersies with the same purpose
in view. I would like a further explana
tion.”
‘That I can’t gi’ve, sir,” Godfrey an
swered firmly.
"'Perhaps you can?” and the Colonel
turne 1 to Barnabas.
Tii>e old man shrok his head. ‘P’s a
private matter, sir,” ‘he replied, "an' my
li-ps are sealed. But what this young
leftenant says is all true.”
Colonel Butler looked puzzled and
vexed. "Whomdid Major Langdcn put
in command of the party?” he* sharply
inquired of Godfrey.
“Simon Glass, sir.”
‘And why were you—an officer of rank
—sent along as a subordinate?”
I BEG YOU TO SPARE THESE MEN,” PLEADED GO DPR ED.
want you to play executioner I'll tell 1
yon. Lcn't interfere again.”
Wi... a .-fowl Class slunk away, and
for a moment the officer scrutinized h.s
three captives in silence. The upper
.bin 5 now wrapp l it:
flames and the red glare made the scene
is light as day. Tories and Indians
.-tend, grouped in a half circle, the fer
ror r with cold, pitikss faces, while 'ho
1; rtt-x* stared fer eiously under their
painted cheeks a- They gripped their
blued stain*-d ten. thawEs and edged
nearer w.th fiend.sh anticipation, (i d- ,
had wi : a ta
j rty. was standing '<> ■ rv.ir. an ! It is
face a!- tie sh >wed pity. H-* blushed as!
N . .. 1 SCO vert 1 him an i g ive him a
quick glance cf con*mp! end defiance.
M1 hi can’t ext; >■: m *> • '
Bntk-r finally said. Wi % .t f w hours
at' * r th>- surrender j ’• *r- * mn 1 here
wi h arms in your p >sc*s- ’.--a ■ -:recr I
mjr a
the offensive, firing kliberut-Jy cu a
; . my fore .
That's right, colonel." chimed in
Class. “They shot first. We’ve six
dead litre.”
•We were- comptll- d to fire, sir." raid
Barnabas. We had no way to retreat,
an' that ruffian yonk-r told h:s men not
to let a one of u escape."
••Exa tly.” asst ate! Glass, t«r m}
c ;.j •; was to make prisoners. I saw you
an I yi.-ur men re wi r th* arm? you ha 1
hidd* n in th- v. 1 and 1 was jus.ili -d in
fallowing to discover your purpose."
A; this Godfrey star.td to come for
ward.. 1 • i:chaag* 1 h.G min 1 and stopped.
Hi? f:a e vas pal- and Laggard.
"Man. >ou ii '" cried McNirhol. turn
ing to the one-eyed Tory. ‘You never
saw us g-t th* guns. and. veil didn’t even
know we were here until y u reach-1
; cabin. '• i . ndered an
the first, every one of us would have
• on massj'T' 1 in c-.!! blood. I know
\ u v. you vil-t- traitor."
.;i. i. i -n't !• I! ’• *hnt j*l el.” rr*
, - iglan
N.chol. "The affair happened jus-: as I
said."
“Hang the affair.” :- =.*:Iy exclaimed
the officer. Hr moved aside for a mo
rn tit to converse with Captain C. i
w ii, of the Royal Greer..-, and then
turned to the prirs. "My duty is
\ :y simple." he said.
"There :? but on- question at stake.
Y u were found be_ring arm? :r» v. • a
t. ,n cf my t rm?. You have brought
y ur fat' upon your??Ives, and now—’’
Sir. would car lives havbeen rite
auywi re in this valley without fire
arm??" interrupted Barnabas.
Colonel Butler bit his lip with rage. ,
‘I don’tknow, sir. I don't oven know
fully the object of the expedition.”
‘Glass you can explain this my.-- ry.”
exclaimed the colonel, losing ail pa
tience.
"Sir. troul 1 you have me hr ray my
rust?” demand'd Glass, with well
feigaed indignation.“You .-aw my pa
pers y-.-terday. You know that th y
are signed by Maj r Langdon, and that
I am acting under h.s o: dtr=."
"And under mire as w. 11. sir." replied
the colonel, with a frown. "There c„n
b-no independent commands while I|
..ave control here. C<i:n -. wc’li rln,;» th
matter. I wan: you -o do some work for
me to-morrow. You are just the man
for i‘. and you can haw i.i- force you
h d out of the for: wh n my jack waa
turned."
‘I am at your service, sir.” Glass an- j
swerc-1 in a rr. allih d to.. .
The colonel nodded. “You may as
well camp here-for hr balance of the
night and star: early in the morning.
Scour the whole upper part of the val
ley. ar.d burn every c_b.u and Louse to
its foundations."
A wicked smile show-d how well
pleased the ruffian w„s wi\i his or
ders.
“And how about the prisoners, sir?”
he asked, carelessly.
i r. .S'n m e .stands. ' o:or. i »u -
“I \ . -
u. f*-w hours to prepa; • for • -:.i. Hang
or shoo: them at daybreak.”
"I can't enfertaln your app'-al.” h
added to Godfrey. “Your arguments do
no: mitigate the fact that tbes .• r- i>eis
•a re found in arms. I must do my
duty.”
In spite of Glass ad tl
ning looks. Godfrey made a :; i at
:• mp: to save the prisoners, bu> Colonel
Uutlr-r cut him short in a mini; r that
forbade further appeal. The officer
was in an ugly mcwd. for Lis n.r iral
curiosity to solve the rr.; - • ry cor.r.‘<-'
• d with the cabin, ho : Is a biff!- !.
But ai s of n im] nd
c i his immediate presence a: th for:,
and without d< lay h- march d off a- the
li-..: of th- Ro.'al Gr - r.s.
Glass's first act r the departure
-,f C 1 nel B it ' s to sear h N ith in
thoroughly fror.i heo i o foot, ar.d the
lad submitted w th an air of surprise
that was more ft.gr. than r al; for
by this time he hoi an inkling of what
it ail meant.
Th ruffian ecu' ! hardly concea! his
c aappoictment when he failed to find
wbat be wanted. He proce d d to
starch McXicol and Barnabas—luckily
m "ing the latt r's boots and
he reviled the prisoners with the most
bitter taunts and insults his brutal mind
could invent.
Nathan lost his temper and answered
back, thereby receiving a cruel blow in
the face; but Barnabas andi McN’ichol
stocially endured the shower of abuse.
None of the three showed any sign of
f iir. though they knew they were to die
in the morning, and their courage might
well have won admiration and pity from
a more chivalrous foe. But Simon
Glass’s half dozen Tory comrades—-who
numbered among the survivors of the
squad of dragoons—were nearly as bru
tal and degraded as himself.
The rest of the force wore Indians,
and mercy or pity could have been bet
ter expected from a pack of enraged
panthers than from these blood-thirsty
Senecas.
The ruffian finally wearied of his past
time and walked toward the cabin, which
•was now almost consum d. After watch
ing the dying blaze for a moment he re
turned. "How soon will those ruins be
cool?” he asked of one of his compan
ions.
“YOT’ HAD BETTER BE PRAYING.
YOl* REBELS " HE SAID IN A
SNEERING T< iNE.
"I should judge in about two or three
hours,” the mau r plitd.
Gla.-.t looked pleased. "We'd better
be turning in." he continued, "for we
must take an arly start in the morning.
We’ll hang t.i rebels before . we go.
bring them over yonder now."
H,. ;.rl ?)>.- way to a thicket of low
bushes ‘hat stood on the near bank of
th- .- iris. In ’he center of the thicket
a n :hre ■ s *r saplings, and to these
the pr:?'.tt»:rs were secured in a sittir-g
; ,.,i:ion with tbiir arms fastened be
hin l 'sm r.t:d their backs turned to
ler ; i. > n g ee<n bat : *
w rk was lone thoroughly, Glass de
parted.
"You had better be praying, you
rebels." he sa d in a sne ring tone, "fet
yo.ir tit' ks will stretch at the tirst light
of dawn."
T ni.-'r was very sultry and the
In ■ • ■ • '
in groups amid the thick grass that
carpeted the clearing. A sentry was
‘d on guard <t the thicket, and as
h pac d tc and fro with loaded musket
:h- upper par; of h!s body was visible
tptives. T. set no
o her.- f thi party, fer (h bushes. but
• h • sil*. ;.e* indicated 'bu' all were
ii-lrrp. G 'dtrev had kept in the buck
gr m ifter lolonel Butl r's < ir
•tir*. < i . r : »r the purpose of shunning
Oh>s • r o avoid thase he had vainly
tried to befrien I.
Ti; re w s no hope of escape, and for
awhile h wretched little group
talk- 1 in with-; -r.s. each nobly endeav
or ng • ci.- r and comfort the others.
N l; . 1 r-.-’t 1 much on the previous
Barnabas and Me*
vie fell
\; hari was now alone with his |
»]; ' an! in iic* face of death his j
f : . i:ie . linos’ ;• - rt-il him, and his
a i,d yield 1 to hitter anguish. He
Uv- 1 the p.st over a-ain—his boyhood
days lur in 'he valley, his years at
coileg • in Phil;: i lphia. and thin the
siring of terri.de eclats tl.ut had be
gun -v! h the I of his frier cn Mcn
nMu h i attk-fi 11. IJu: amid the ror.
flio-ic? thoughts t .ot d:sw -s-! him
;he m morv ci Godfrey’s sirar.g _• words
was uppermost.
’What can i mean?” 'he la! asked
, j if “Is 1 posrtbl that M
l.tng Ion .if-lit Si... u G! -s her° ' > fin l
and st • • papers? H beard
father tell wi: r> tiv-y were, but w\y
should he want ti get them? Iti-a-h p
myaf rj one too incredible to be tra
Vainly the lad puzzled hm-lf. and
a: last he fell into 2 restless sleep. A
couple of hours liter he awoke with
- r . : • ili/ii r at once wh<re be w -
an 1 dreading »o find tha dawn bad
come. The moon wa> far d wn anl un
der a bank of clouds, and th - cabin
had lor.g aiij burnt i’.-:elf out to the 1: -t |
spark. But from 'he direction of th
ruin fi ;3'e«i a dull noise an 1 the sound
of 1..W V -)i> • a.
•’Barnabas. ar** you a wok ?" Nathan
whispered.
-Ye,. 1.1." muttered the ol 1 man ana
as he ; r k <• M<NbT. 1 open d his eyes:
anl twisted his cram;-I holy.
B- for - mur * could be sa:. *ne bushes j
ru-'l d and a dark form shoul luring 1
a musk- crept sof'ly in o fhe thirkt'. ;
* ,r it was in let I he pUw a i
finger to hi- IT?
•H'i'V ' 1. •vuisprre l. 1 ve come t •
J ' V
lm! four Indianr. T>.<y are poking
obout in the a.-:be.-- nf the cabin, and
•vp mu- e t away before- they return.
I am 2 'ina wi h you, for my life i
equally in d :nz r.”
H -toope*? flown with a’kr.lfp in one
h -ip] and qti.-kl.v 1 *he c-irdn that j
hel l ti e prisoners. “Now cmi'.’ he
ai led, "Look w! -re you step, and
don't even breathe loudly."
III.
Nathan and hl» companions, rose,
'trembling with Joy, an i almas* deub‘
/
r;u ■ .v.-y kc*' w* by what ex-remr- cau-1
•.ion safe-/ must b? w n. and as no!=e- i
1»-siv a- shadow- they tralle! td ir
s ro -in 1 .-tiff n ! t . Ii* s be tind G .1
. • . - . , t tl ket
The j urz officer ha ! thought ou* hi3
plans beforehand, an 1 with a warning'
_ - ure he s-pp-i irro 'he spring at tl.
pain where i- b- am»* a narrow rival:-*,
and brawled !:’s courte swiftly across
the lower comer of the clearing. The
rnrar of <
wa r drowned w„at slight a i»e was un
avoidable. }
No v canx ti - critical m i • at
anxiotis hearts th" fugitives waded
slowiy down the stream, crouching low
between the fringe of tail gras* that
ct^Qceaie-d, on bc-th s:d.-s, the sleeping
/orms of Tories and Indians. On and
on they went amid the unbroken si.
leiice, and at hist the dense foliage o'
the woo 1 do©*-1 over thi?m like an are’
They had safdy pasft-d the limit* oj
.’he camp. They waded, twenty yardt
further and thee stepped on laud.
Godfrey handed his musket to Bar
nabas. “You know tbo country,” ht
whispered. “L/xxl h« you think 1- st.“
‘We'll make a wider detour back o'
th^fort." Barnabas replied. ‘an’ n
come around to the river at the iowe,
end of the mlley.”
0» a brisk tro- they started toward
the nortuwest. and g^ they turrS11
along the forest rails that the old
woodsman chose, Golfrev hrietly • j
what all were ImpuVat to know.
“I got awake a bit ago.” he sa! L
and heard Glass instructing four ol
the worst Indians to t ihawk you
{>le Just before daylight. They w. ^
to kill me at the same rime and ppv.
tend it was all done by mistake Thai
was to be Glass s rev* for what i
said to-night. I rem .it. ; perfectly s’Ul
pretending to be n<j
Glass and the Indiana w nt over to t ^
ruins of the cabin I d. 1 all at ot * •
what to do. I told th- entry I had
been ordered to relio him and 1;
handed over his musk - ;»hf>ut a word
He was asleep in two minutes, and my
way was clear.”
Barnabas and MeX warml*
thanked the lad, and \ ,a:1 impul
sively clasped his hand •-[ hope * we
are friends again. Go!- h,.
“I will never forget « ■ jou did to
night.”
"I will do more. If vrr I g<* the
chance,” Godfey answered in a mean
ing tone. "But I can • x dafn now —
wait until we are certain f freedom.”
•By this time thefugitiv..- u p*. a m|j^
from tho enemy's can. and before
<hc-y had gone twenty ,yar further a
faint outcry behind trld i , ti,*-ir
cape was discovered. \!i * w depend
ed on spec*!, for It was c r i-i q;ar -ho
Indians, by the aid of ie- would
follow the trail With th- ir. ring keen
ness of bloodhounds.
Barnabas led the little \ ry a’ a
ftoady pace, taking tb-m .rai miles
to the rear of the fort befor turned
parallel with the river. x w thejij
headed for the lower end of • valley
and for nearly three hours, w! '*• thoy\
traversed th--* lonely and gloo:u> forost.
they heard no sound but the chirp of
night birds, and the distant cries of
prowlintg wild animals.
“I can’t keep this up much longer,”
tinted Nathan. ‘The Indians miv
close behind, but for my part, I be
lieve they’ve lost tho trail.”
"Mabbee so, lad," replied Barnabas
“though the quietness ain’t an Indlt
cation of it. We're all badly winded,
•but tho river ain’t fur off. Ouct w«
get across, or find a l>oat—”
Th*- rest of the sentence was dr.wn< i
by a blood curdling w;xx>p that rnr^
/vith awful shrillness through the, s!
1 ut wood. Another and another fol
lowed, and the glimmer of a tore.h u i
seen coming over a knoll at a fur
long’s space behind the fugitives.
“The Senecas are ho: >n the trail.’'
cried Barnabas, “an’ th--:r keen earf
have hoard us. On fur :i.o river! It's
our lost chance!”
To be Continu- I.
PIEDMONT.
Piedmont. W. Va.t August 8.—A com
yrpgational meeting will bo held at thi
Lutheran church Tuesday evening.
Childs avenu1' 1h beiirg Improved.
Frank McGenler’s llt»L- boy was rut
over by a wagon Tuesday.
The Cycle club will leave here Sun
day at 1 o’clock for a run to the Keyset
camp meeting.
Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Souders are wi'fc
Martinsburg friend.-.
W. R. Cogian is now r-legraph op< r
a*or at Altamont. •
I)r. John Daily is a* Washington.
Miss Edith Pickett, of Fairmont, l!
visiting here.
Mr. Herbert Vernett, of Davis, is in
town.
Miss Grace Coro, of Grafton, is tht
guest of Mrs. J. W. Newlon.
Mr. John G. Luke av-l 6ons, Allen
town this week.
Miss Edith Sickd, of Bn!;.more, is
visiting Miss Anna Bruce.
.Mr. Harrison Hahn, of Philadelphia,
will :< uv. th** June*; m >1.
Miss Estella Hull, of Wn- i ng Is vis
iting Mrs. W. C. Johnson.
Mr. Fred Minshall, civil engineer, a
home aft<r a year’s absence.
Mrs. G. W. Harrison is vlsi*ng h r
•laughter. Mrs .B. D. Millholl i. !. a
Reading. Pa.
Miss Velma Wilt will con ! t die M
E. Epworth Lf ague Sun -v.ning
County Commissioner P. S Minsh.i!’,
was on the South Branch th:.- we^k
H. IJ. Souders is home from M trims
hurp.
Miss Ros'- Kelly spent the w. • k v
Deer Park. .
Prof. C. E. Smith. D. D. pr-acfi 1
several excellent sermons in »L- K -
pal church this week
T. B. Grfitzner and Hazny Tr-i.
went to Romney on their wheels r •
!y.
Misses Marion and Ann 1 D
have been visiting Cum
friends.
M -- Grace Llppincotr s *’i
Mi.-s B - ** Poland. at. Bay it !
M -a H ::*»<• Stanley is v
Fairmont.
Mrs. Jarr.< - M Henry '3 h * ‘ fr ’ 1
hospital a* Bah more.
Mr. peter Linaon. ag-'d a1 7
years, di- 1 this week. Fu
St. peter’a r’j-holic C i
more ii. sr.
The Catholic Juvenile T
Society, of 'h..- place, held v
p cnlc at >1: Lake Park, .V
day.
Mr. T. R. Rowboth : ' \
daughter*:, M. -• - Carr
Philadelphia, are guests
A. I.. Wh.aman.
MissetJ pierpo'nt. of 1
gue-v- of M-- s Annie
The Mi.--** Mole and gu- '
of tiie we<-k a* M". Lak
and Deer Park.
David Anderson, a W
rra< k hr.d. w - struck
engine Thur- My who a: 11
arm was badly hur'.
Mr. ar.d Mrs W "
and Mr.-:. Carrie W...
from Ml Airy, M l. ( 4
Messrs. W. A P *rfer. ‘ . *
Pa.; K. r Lai Br.gtr
1/er, of Oak and M . M ■
Garden; J. E. Mating.’ 1
H. Sanford, and wife an
of Ron irj V
R. M. Parkin.- ti 1 '* ~ . _ ..
Baltimore, were in P *
day. . . t* <?
JP ->rs. C G. Da
Land.* tree', of Da. 1
mers. of Clarksburg; R , ;k. ra.
Fairfax. V? B- M -v ,
burg. Harr . A N _ , M w,r«
and X Tibbetts of !>->*•
I

here Wednesday. *
Heat Las been intense.
i ‘
i .

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