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The Wheeling intelligencer. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1903-1961, July 22, 1922, Image 11

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FDRMER POLICE LIEUTENANT DIES !
AT FARM NEAR GRANULE RSVILLE. 0.
O.EO*OX "81*D 1" BKtKSOir j
rASSUD AW AT I.A8T TTXim*?
toiaowiho Bxrxr xx.i.
HISS
gtwro*rt OB Folic* Tor?* TJb4*p Chief
HMtlng* and Aoached Ban* of .
X>**k S*rg**nt
George C. Brlcmson, aged M years. |
former policeman. tiled last night at ?
g ;n o'clock at rhandlervilte. O. fo>
lowing an Illness of the past Ave week*. j
"Sandv" as he was known by all his -
friends served ?n Wheelings police,,
force for a number of years. He was j
? tinner bv trade and ?rst was on the
police force under Chief Howard H. i
Hastings patrolling the Sixth ward If ? ;
many years. He also served under c hlef j
Thomas Leyland and when thiefJ. C., 1
Sill was appointed he was toad ?
geant Of police. He left the poll' e ser
vice when Campbell H. Henderson was I
appointed chief. . h
For many months he w as n Ik a - I
man at ihe Belmont riant of the'Wheel
Inr Steel Iron company. FUe ,
ago he became 111 and in an e. > ?
*?cn'n his health purchased a farm at ?
t'handlersville. 1? miles east of Zane- i
ville Ohio. moved
Mr Brimson for years, until he mox eu
?? h's far mseveral months ago. resUi
M on the south Side He is survived
hv one daughter. Mrs. W P. "[ .
Wheeling and three sisters Mrs ^U
Ham Mien, of California. Mrs Jam*
omtrh of Pittsburgh and Mr.. ti
531/. <>??
survives Henry Briemson. o. -shfr" n
,"n?,l arranr.m'"" hava
t-ome of his daughter. Mrs W 1 a- j 1
?os at No. 68 Twentieth street.
MRS. DORA ROBERTS j
Mrs. Pora Roberts, wife of tbe lato ,
Joseph E. Roberts aid a ?^feer o
one of the oldest families in Ma-snail
countv. died at the home of her sis**r:
Mrs W. D. Dunn. Sixth street and
Morton avenue. MoundsviUe. J?t<* \,
dav morning at 4:30 o'clock, after au ,
Illness of the past two >'ears_ Th^e .,
ceased was well known in tne Mourn I
City, having life there practically her j;
entire life. Rnh. i ?
Her late husband. Joseph E. IvoD (
orts. was formerly assistant postmas- j ,
tor of MoundsviUe. and died s<npr?'|'
ve irs ago. She was a devout menib r ,
of the First Methodist church and ,
took an active part in all of ,
church affairs. .
Surviving are two sons. Hnn and,
Elmer, both of this city; two state. . ;,
Mrs. George Porsey and Mrs. . u.
Dunn both of this city. s>hc is aUo
survived hv two granddaughters and ,
one grandson. Joseph Webster Rob- j.
'f Wneral services will be held from!,
the late homo. 7*1 Jefferson avenue
MoundsviUe. tomorrow afterncmn at
2:30 o'clock. Rev. Scott pastor of [
the First Methodist church, will be n .
charge of the services. The body will
be laid to rest iu Mount Rose ceme
tery.
MRS. NELLIE K. LIVELY I
This morning at S: 30 ?'''Jock ^,n j
held the funeral services for the lat.
Mrs. Nellie K. Lively of Huntington.,
W aV.. who died last Wednesday.
Services will be held from the horn
tf her parents. Mr. and Mrs. James I
fcneley, 951 Main street, and will be |,
followed by reouiem high mass at St. ,.
)oscj)h's cathedral at 9 o clock. In
terment w ill be made in Mount Pal- .
vary cemetery.
former~resident DIES
Funeral cervices for the late Mrs.
May Tavlor Lowry. daughter or v>. :
and Mrs. P- H. Taylor, formerly of,
this citv. and wife of Thomas A. i,
Lowrv. former advertising manager of
the Chicago Tribune, who died last
week at her late home in Chicago. Ill
were held last Monday afternoon at ,
the late home. 4752 Beacon street. Chi
cago The deceased was educated in j
the schools of this city, and was a j
gmdmvte ot Mount de Chantal
MRS. THELMA GING HAWKINS
I^ast sad rites over the body of the
late Mrs. Thelma Glnjr Hawkins, who
died at the North Wheeling hospital
jesterday tnomit)? at 2:30 o'clock,
will be neld at the late home. No. 110 !
Ninetcjnth street, on Mondav aft?p i1
r.oon at 2 o'clock. The deceased was
In her twentv-first year, and was tho
v. ife of William R Hawkins. Arrange
nicnts for interment are as yet ir.com- j
piete.
Mis. Hawkins had been a lifelong f
resident of this city, and was eduoat- |
?d in the public schools here. She had
many friends, who w ill be shocked to t
hear of her sudden demise.
Sutviving are her husband. William
G Hawkins, and an infant child: also
her parents. Mr. and Mrs. William H.
Gins, and the following brothers and
sisters- William H. Glnsr. Jr., Charles. :
Joseph. Russell, Robert. Har?ld. Lil- j
lian. Marearet, Dorothy and Helen
jing.
AWARD BADGES j
Boy Scout Court of Honor Meete With
Boys at Camp Agrvmlng on Big j
Whooiing Crook.
The regular weekly meeting of the j
Roy Scout Court of Honor was held ;
last evening at Camp Agaming A. J. j
Nsger. L. L. Stidger and H. O. Porta, i
members of the Court were present to j
make awarde
The following Scouts were presented !
with badge: Merit Badges?Russell I
Heknlnr 2: Ralph Pickett. 2: Clyde J
Smith. * Charles Crazier. 5: Jack Wolf. ?
1: Donald M--011I. 2: JamesF*. A'ox. Jr.,'
5; Edward J Pox. 2: El wood Witt. 5; I
Robert Ash worth 2; J. p. Soh|aub, 2;!
and J K Chase. First Claxs.Radges ?
?Robert A shworth Second Class J
Badges ? William Koehler. Cornell!
Klein. William Nager and William J
Parker
Announcement was made last even
ing that Scoutmaster C. m, Thompson,
?f Troop 21. has challenged the Camp (
team to a game of baseball. The Camp j
team has accepted and the game will j
be played on the camp ground this j
afternoon.
Tent No. 5 captured first honors In \
the field and acquatlc meet held at the
eamp yesterday afternoon. Tent No. 3 | '
was second; Tent No, 9 third In the !
field events and Tent No. 1. third in 1
:he aquatic events.
TO CONFERENCE
Frank I.edvinka. of Bridgeport, pres
ident of Sub-district No. 5. of District
N'o <5. C. M. W. of A., accompanied by I
William Roy. of Bellaire. vice presl- i
dent of District No. 6, were in Colum- 11
bus. O.. yesterday attending a meet
ing of the executive board of the dls-ji
trlet. which, it is understood, has been <
-ailed relative to the recent develop, i
merits In the ration wide coal strike, j
RICHLAND MINE ;
IS UNDER GUARD
^ I
tr. 8. Marshal Buchwald and Deputiaa
Standing ?nard at Richland Xnit
Night
Armed guards were patroling the pro-|
r>ertv of the Richland t'oal company In
South War wood early this morning and
ilthouglji no trouble la anticipated, all
precautions are being a a ami
Pnlted States Marshal Vrank Reed and
i squad of men were on duty last night.
William Boring, superintendent
the mine, which Is part of the J. I. M? -
Klnley Interests which owns the Si e
*a mine at Cllftonvllle where the mine
fought ..at M-day.nStated
IvorklnfT dally at the mine and
Put has been averaging 1- '^n? un|pu
The mine has never worked as i
nine but has always pa'd the
scale and a fraction more The nl n
male calls for 7< cents a ton and tnw,
nine Is paying 7? cents a ton.
PROGRESS IDE!
ON THE TARIFF;
katerial kmtjction ra?-j
POSXD DUTIES ON TEAR. HEMP
and jute.
Slothing Maker. Protest On W.ool j
Schedule To B# Made Subject
Of x&yMtlgatlou.
Developments today In senate consld- j
?ration of the administration tariff bill ^
ncluded. . th(, 1
Material reductions in most o' the |
luties originally proposed on products
it" flax, hemp and jute.
A Charge by Senator Smith. Democrat j
South Carolina, that the rate of two (
ents a hundred or. whtte arsenlc was
written in to the bill for the sole
benefit "of the great Juggenheim Smel
line interests." ,
' The introduction of a resolution by
Senator clouding. Republican. Idaho
proposing a public investigation of the
claim of clothing producers that t e
proposed rate of 31 cents a pound on
soured wool would result in an In
crease of about *4 In the price of
suit of clothes and $7 in the price of
an overcoat. _-?i_
Senator Hooding- resolution proposln
an investigation of the effect of the
wool duty was referred to the commlt
tee on audit and amounts It would
empower n special committee of five
to hold full hearings and make a re
port to congress Mr. Hooding Is the
chairman of the Republican "Krlc,{|
tura! tariff bloc which ^
S3 cents rate before the fian-o iom
niittee majority.
Duties Approved.
Titles apporved by the senate .n
'rtt fabrics, manufactured In any
1". ner cent ad valorem.
Table damask. 4* per cent ad valorem
Towels and napkins of flax nr hemi
from 40 to 55 per cent ad ^,orM,,p
Handkerchiefs from ..a t- 45 per
cent ad valorem no
clothing and articles of wearing P
Parel not specifically provided for 3 a
cents ad valorem: shirts, roll a rs anl
ruffs. 40 cents per dozen and 10 per
?rnt ad valorem.
Wool fabrics, weighing not than
??, and no, more than 47 ounces to
npr .'I *1 \ R i"
the square yard. .>o pcr
""plain, wove, fabrics weighing lass
than 4U ounces to he square yard ..o
per cent ad valorem.
Woven fabrics, commonly used fr
paddings of Interd'nlngs. cf ^
hemp. 55 P?r ront ad valorem. f
SO per cent ad valorem.
Woven fabrics, not especially provid
ed for 40 per rent ad valorem
Tubings, garters, suspenders, brace
cord- tassels. 35 per cent ad valorem.
T ?n'oleum 35 per cent ad valorem:
floor oilcloth. 30 per cent ad valorem^
Single yarns in the gray, ma
fax hemp or ramlne. not less than .
nemp ^ valorem.
?..? y?m. .f
or gases 17 cents a pound nnd -0 Ier
cent.
PLAN AUTO CAMPAIGN
TOUR FOR BEETHAM
Cart 17.. Ohio. July 21.?Plans were com
pleted here today for an Eastern Ohio
automobile tour by business men in this
and surrounding oounttcs in the inter
est of the candidacy of Speaker Rupert
Beetham for Governor.
Guernsey. Carrol. Jefferson. Colum
biana. Tuscarawas and Mahoning coun
ties will be toured. The territory has
been divided and every hamlet visited.
During this tour a number of speeches
will be made by the candidate.
Commendations of his stand against
the classification amendment are dally
reaching the Speaker's headquarters
here. He will speak in his brother's.
Dr. Emory Iteetham's church. In Van
Wert, on Sunday evening. His theme
will be. "Theodore Roosevelt."
MOVE BY RAILROAD
TO ORGANIZE SHOPS
St. Paul, Minn., July 21.?Forma|lon
of a new shopworkers* organization
composed of new employes and old men
who refused to go on strike has boon
started by the Great Northern railroad,
the flrbt railroad reported to have taken
such action. It wals.announced today.
M'MENIMAN GOES TO
CONFER WITH DAVIS
v.
Chicago. July 21.?W. L. McMenlrnen.
member o fthe labor group of the la
bor board announced tonight that be
will go to Mooscheart tomorrow to con
fer with James W Davis, secretary of
labor, regarding the shopmen's strlka.
Mr. McMenlmen said he had been tn>lt
ed to meet Secretary Davis at Moose
heart but would not comment on the
matters to be discussed.
loses two relatives
Sister*vtlie. July 21.?When Mrs Wil
li m Meredith of this city returned home
from Pittsburgh, where she was called
by the fcudden death of a daughter-in
law, she found a telegram announcing
the death of her only sister, Mrs.
Charles Everett, of Mercersbepg. Pa.
Abyssinia s population is 8,001,000.
I
OVERLAND HITS
CHEVROLET CAR
MACHETES EOLL OTEE INTO CORN- j
nXTSD JITTBR CRASH ON
BBISOEPOHT FIKX.
Driver of Overland Said To Have
Been Under Influence of in
toxicants.
An Overland automobile said to bear I
Ohio licence No. 394695 driven by a j
I colored man and occupied by another
! colored Eian whose names could not j
be learnt-ft. struck a Chervplct machine (
driven bj a Belluire man and occupied |
j by two children on the Bridgeport Pike j
between stops 22 and 23 early last even
ing. seriously damaging both cars.
According to eyewitnesses of the ac- j
, eident. the Overland coming Inward j
Bridgeport, It seems as though the j
driver of the car was under the In-.
fluenee of liquor as h'.s driving lndibat- ^
; ed When the Overland struck the other ,
I car both rolled over Into a cornfield near j
i the pike Both machines were consider- ,
ably damaged The Pheverlot was re* j
I moved for repairs while at n late hour
the Overland was still In the field al* '
though the owner had taken most of the j
1 undamaged parts away with him.
Although none of the figures in the I
accident were injured to any extent,
all wore badly bruised about the bodv
from their flight over me nana. Tho !
names of occupants of the cars could
not Ire learned.
GUARD AT CADIZ:
FIELD IS OUIET
RUMOR OP MARCH ON UNION
TOWN FAILS TO MATXRIAT.TZT.. j
Outfit With Complete Camp Xquip- 1
ruent Ready to Preserve Peace.
Cadiz. O.. July 21.?Colonel Robert ,
j llaubrecht, commanding Ohio National 1
guardsmen, stationed here for possible
activity in Eastern Ohio coal fields t"- j
night reported everything quiet In the.
district.
| Investigation of a report that union j
miners were nreparing to march on a j
strip mine near Unlontown, Belntont I
j county, failed to disclose any gathering |
I ot men. he said. *
Appeal For U. S. Troop*
Columbus. Ohio. July 21 --Notwith-i
i standing tile fact that national guard
; troops today were held tinder arms at
Cadis and Igincastcr. stragetlc centers I
j for use should disorders arise In the
? eastern or southern coal fields of the
' state, the Consolidated Coal it Coke
' Contpanv of Butler. Pa today appealed
to President Harding for Federal troops !
, to protect their Interests at New |
' Straltsvlllo, where attempts to load
slack coal were stopped by disorders j
July 4. Troops sent front Columbus
last night in command of Robert Hau
! brecht arrived at Cadiz early today.
They are quartered In the city inuniei
i pal park. Lancaster troops were nt
' their armory. Everything was report
ed quiet from all the coal producing
) counties.
Replying to this telegram. Governor,
; Pavis made public a letter he had
'sent to the company's office at Butler.
I Pa.. In which he pointed out that stale
troops were mobilized and being as
I signed to stragetlc centers for use In
! case disorders arise anywhere within
! the mining territory. The replv sent
I to the company's general offices in But
ler Pa., eald:
Governors Reply
"Referring to your letter of July 2<V j
delivered to this office by your at
i torneys. written with reference to
loading from slack pile In Perry county.
; Ohio .our military forces are mobilized
and are being assigned to stragetlc
point* determined upon by officers In
charge of troops, for the purpose of
meeting the situation In event of any
possible industry disturbances.
"Your property is being considered in
this connection with all other property
that might be affected by the existing
. conditions."
' In a stament making public the let
ter, Governor Pavl-s pointed out that
j n national guard company mobilized
last night. Is under arms today at J
I la?ncaster. Fairfield county, adjoining !
| Pery county, where tho slack pile Is
| situated.
WEST VA. OPERATORS
HOPEFUL OF ACTION
TO OPEN THE MINES
Morgnntown. W. Va. July 21.?Live i
Interest i* being^evidenced on the parti
! of coal operators In the Joint meeting
j of representatives of the Monongahela |
j Coal Association an<! the Northern
West Virginia Coal Operators' Assocla- .
| tlon to bo held In Fairmont tomorrow.
' The Monongahela Association operates
I In the Morgan town section with mines:
> along the Monongahela river.
Operators here feel that the meeting I
i will he productive of something tang- j
| |hle toward the resumption of operR-j
! tlorrs a general scale In Northern West |
Virginia.
| A meeting of the policy committee of (
' the Monongahela Association was held
! today In the ofllce of President W K. J
! WRlson. of Fairmont, when David O. J
Reay, of the Brady Interests and B. M. I
j Chaplin of the Chaplin Collerle* com-|
j pan yof Morgantown were among those
I attending. The meeting was for th?|
purpose of formulating plans and <!e- j
I termlnlng the policy to govern the as- ;
soclatlon In Saturday's meeting
I i
-
Georges Greek Miners' j
Ranks Are Unbroken
j
I Operators Make Wo More to Reopen
Mines?500 Working at Davis
Colliery
Cumberland. Md.. July 21.?Officials
of the t'nited Mine Workers and repre
sentatives of striking miners, operators
have learned from preliminary surveys,
are firm In their declarations that there j
J will be no break In thetr ranks In the I
fjeorges Creek section. If mining opera
tions arc attempted. The operators have '
; taken no steps ns yet toward opening {
' their mines. Only a small majority of j
j miners In the section comprising what
j Is termed the "conservtlve" class, are j
willing to return to work If operations
I are resumed.
Tn the 1'pper Potomac field, where (he
junion Is not strongly entrenched, ihe
Davis Coal ?? Coke company claims to
be producing 2.50o tons dally. h?\Fng (
I 5*>o noen at work Other operators are i
j preparing to resume.
DWUSfTAD mishap
SlstersvlHe. July 21.?Roger, the 11
year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Barl Miller,
figured In an unusual accident He was
thrown to the pavement when his bicy
cle struck a large pebble and received a
deep gash in his tongue, it w?.s i,.unu |
necessary to close the wound with a
clamp.
T'nlverstty of Aberdeen library, at Ab
erdeen, Scotland, has 141.000 volumes.
i xj v l'-i jl?. , ... _
MINER IN JUIL HERE SfllTfO
HAVE IDENTIFIED PRISONERSi
INTIMATED EAST KIOKT OKSi
miner here as ha vino IDEN
TIFIED SOME OF THE
MARCHERS.
OTHERS SAID TO HAVE ADMITTED
HA VINO OTXNS MORNTNO OF
BATTLE BUT DECLARE
THEY FIRED IN AXR
REPORTED HERE RICHLAND COAL
COMPANY WILL ERECT MONU- !(
MENT IN memory OF
SHERIFF KILLED IN
FIOHT.
A minor of Cliftonvl'.le. \*^?l
witnessed the mine battle there las^
Monday morn!"* and who Is a prisoner.
In the Ohio county Joit. yesterday after
noon identified ft number of the rr son
era as taking part in the march and the
battle that resulted In the death of
Sheriff H. If. I>uval and six others and j
the Injurylng of many others. j
The miner who made the identification |
of many of the miners now in prison ;
Is not known, authorities refusing to.
divulge his name i
Prosecuting Attorney W. P. Milken. of ,
Brooko county, and Assistant Proserin- ,
Ing Attorney Clinton U. < amphell. of ,
nhlo countv, conducted the investIga- |
11ons yesterday and the examination of ,
the prisoners in the jail here.
It was stated last night that several
of the prisoners yesterday admitted
hovlng guns and shooting them hut de
nied that they shot any person. We
were told to shot in the air and to raise
h i" one prisoner ts alleged to hate
said. ,
There were no new developments in
the investigation yesterday. All is >
quiet In the Brooke county coal Held",
and state police are still on duty. Police
and rteputv sheriffs continue to search
the hill side near the Clifton mine where
the battle took place In the hope of ,
finding other bodies In the bushes and I
underbrush
Mariden Will Recover.
Angelo Mariden. the wounded miner
In the Ohio Valley General hospital,
was reported to he in ?? unchanged
condition last night, and although It was
reported several days ago he could not
live, it is now believed that he may rc
lover.
More Ont Yosterday.
Word received here last night was to
the effect that 80 miners at the non- j
union Wellsburg Carnegie mine on Buf- I
fain creek near Wellsburg went on
strike yesterday. Mine officials said
that two men appeared at the plant
late Thursday and talked with the men.
The miners, it Is said, made no do- (
manda.
M-tny Visit Jail.
Begging In broken Knglish for
privilege of seeing their men. a small
army of foreign women from Clifton
vllle. A vol la and other towns ott the
Pennsylvania-West V Irginia border, br
soiged the county jail here yesterday
morning In a fruitless i ffort to see inc.
prisoners confined here.
To Erect Monmnont.
It wa? reported here last night tliat
a monument will be erected on tbe spot
at Cllftonvllle. where former Sheriff
H. H. Puval fell while In the perform-j
anee of his duty. Officials of the
Hlchland Coal Mining Company, it was
stated, would have the monument '
erected.
HEAR TELEPHONE MAN j
William Miller, of the local office of j
the Chesapeake A Potomac telephone
company was the principal speaker at
the regular weeklv meeting of the Ma-j
sonic Forum held yesterday at noon.
Mr Miller's talk wa- ni?>si Interesting ,
and he disclosed many ways and means
of the telephone business unknown to
many Wheeling! tea. lie also demon-,
st rated some of the instruments used |
by the telephone contpanv to detect
trouble' and Illustrated some of tlo?
great problems faced by the employees j
of the company and how they are
?o1\ cd.
RIVER STAGES.
Pavis Island bum 10.j feet, rising,
clear
Warren. one tenth foot. dear.
VANCE MEMORIAL
VESPER SERVICES
Service Will be Held Sunday Even
ing on Spacious Lawn About
Church.
A vesper service, in charge of the j
Christian Endeavor Society, will he
held on the lawn of the Vance Me
morial Presbyterian Church Sunday
evening, at 7 o'clock, an interesting
feature being that the meeting will
he in charge of the young men and
hoys of the society. The subject,
"Growth" is one of importance in
Christian life and experience. The
meeting will he led by Pr. Potter. An
urgent invitation is given to the peo
ple of the church and especially to
the parents of the young people of the
society. At the morning service Dr.
I'otter will speak on the subject:
"Service as a Poubt Hreaker." The
choir will render the following music,
contralto and soprano duet, by Mrs.
Edward Handy and Mrs. Elsa Gund
Hng-Puga. "Consider the Lillies,"
tenor solo, by John Acker, selected.
QUIET HOUR SERVICE
IN OPEN AIR POPULAR
St. Matthews Services are Being Weil
Attended Each Sunday Evening
?Being Held at Echo Point.
I?:st Sunday evening there was the
largest congregation of the season
piepent at the Open Air Services now
being held under the auspices of St.
Matthew's Protestant Episcopal
church. Christians of many names,
together, with numerous ptrsons from
a distance, are joining with the Epis
r< palians in this beautiful, ;|iiol hour,
a.id all r> finding the occasion help
ful The orchestra has been augment
ed 1>\ the .e.union of two new mem
bers, now making seven in all, and
the music was especially good last
Sunday. There will be service again
on Sunday from 6:15 to 7:30, with
the service proper preceded by a 15
minute open air concert by the orch
estra. The Rev. Ur. Strider will
pi each another of the series of ser
mons on Out Poor Religion, the sub
ject this Sunday belnc "The Parable
of the Sower." St John's chapel is
iust at the electric car station at
Echo Point, and there Is no more
beautiful spot In the suburbs. The
setting Is remarkably fine for produc
ing and maintaining the atmosphere
of worship and quiet meditation. In
case of rain the service will he held
In the chapel. The public Is cordially
invited to attend these services which
will continue until further notice.
JUBILEE SINGERS
popijlar Singer* Who Appeared At l&s
slon Services Several Weelc*
Ago Here Again
"Jackson's Jubilee Singers, who sang
at Riverside park a few Sundays ago.
will be the attraction Sunday night at
the Vnion mission open nlr services,
and they are worth coming a long way*
to wr.y." said Superintendent (J. W.
<"ory in an Interview yesterday after
noon. "They are the best I have ever
heard, and have a wonderful list of
songs, many of which have never been
heard in the north. I went to a good
deal of trouble to get them to come
hack to Wheeling, and I would like to
everyone in this city who appre
ciate* good music Sunday night at
R'verside park at 7:"0 P. tn."
LAST OF SERIES j
Sr. Clarence E. Allen Will Conclude
Series Of Stercoptlcan Services
Tomorrow Evening
The closing sermon in the series on
"In the I'ath of the Naiarene" will be
given tomorrow evening at the Fourth
Street Methodist church, llll-lfi Chap
line street, by the pastor, Clarence i
Eugene Allen. Richly colored stereop
tocon views will be used to Illustrate
the sermon. In the morninf the pastor
will preach on "The Plea of the Human"
The chorus choir and quartette will ren
der fine music under the direction of Mr.
March, organist. Everybody welcome.
This church does not close in the sum
mer.
REV. HAINES HERE .
Rev. L. J. Ha!ne? of the Union ml?^
sion. Charleston, arrived in Wheeling!
Friday afternoon and spoke at the regu*
lar evening services at the Union mis
sion. Rev. Haines, has been connected
with the mission at Charleston since
last spring and Is one of the noted mis
sion men of the country.
AT MARTINS FERRY
The Rev. George Uookhart Sr. of
Wheeling Baptist Temple will preach at
the -First Baptist rhurch of Martini ,
Ferry Sunday morning. Rev. Cory of
the Wheeling Union Mission w-lll .take
Rev. Lockhart's place at the Wheeling-.
Temple. He will ge assisted by Rev<
Haines of Charleston. -- '
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I' ST. JOHN'S E. P. CHURCH | ,*'*!
EIT. wTT.T.TAur q., U1PIRT, liinleter.
SUNDAY. JULY 23 | ?
3:15 A. M Sunday School and Bible Class - ;
m.15 A. M English Service u i
NO EVENING SERVICE
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First English Lutheran Church 1
Sixteenth Street between Market and Chapilne
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Dr. II. C. Roller of Pittsburgh will prcaoh at 10:40 A. 3L ^
Sunday School at 9:30.
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' FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCBTh
ChapUne Street?One Door North of Poet Offloe . , ' ;f
C HA Hi IS B. KOBXNSON, PMtor. I -j 4V.
j Bible School at 9:30 A M. Oaases for all Ages -1 *x'.
Public Worship with sermon by the Pastor at 19:46 A. ii. ? -
No Evening Service Strangers Given a Cordial Welcome * *,?' i
L JJ.
![ ST. JAMES- LUTHERAN CHUBOH ];
Chapline Street, near Court House H
I Sunday School 9:15 'J . -1
I MornlnK Service 1945 r
NO EVENING SERVICE
Sermon bv Prof. P. J. Mackensen, of Columbus, Ohio. *
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' ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
2118 Market Street. BIT. S. JC. BTBiUU, Met .
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Sunday School ". 9:15 A. M.
General Services ? 10:30 A. M.
Miss Nell Crow will be the Soloist at the mornlnf service.
A CORDIAL WELCOME TO ALL
V,
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(
You've probably heard political discussions all
week?it won't hurt you to listen to the truth on
Sundav.
ATTEND ' < ? 1 \
First Christian Church
Rev. W. H. Fields, Pastor '
<1
One Service?Morning ....10:30 Bible School 9:30
2112 MARKET STREET - '
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f FOURTH STREET CHURCH
FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL
1211-15 Chapline Street, South of Twelfth " J
CLARENCE EUGENE ALLEN, Pastor
10:4i) A. M.?Sermon, "The Pica of the Human."
7:45 P. M.?Illustrated Sermon, "Iin the Path of the Nazarene." j
Beautiful stercopticon views. A
Fine Music by Chorus and Quartette ' J. ;
SHORT SERVICES FRIENDLY FOLKS ,1 |
v ' '?
r= v? _' I
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St. Matthew's Protestant Episcopal Church
15th and Chapline Streets Rev. R. E. L. Strlder, D. D., Rector
Moraine Service- Sermon. "The Rook of Ruth" 11:00 A. M.
Open Air Service 6:45 F\ M.
(On Lawn St John's Chapel, Beho Point)
Sermon; "The Parable of the Sower."
Other Services: Holy Communion S M.; Church School with Bible
Classes for Men and Women 9:."0 A. M.
PUBLIC CORDIALLY INYITKD
v
A
First Presbyterian Church
Thirteenth and Chapline Streets
SAMUEL "31 GIBSON, D. D., Minister
Sl'XDAV SKRVICER
9 :o0 A. M Bible School
10:4") A. M.?Sermon bv Rev. John M. froston. D. D., of
Pittsburph.
A Cheerful. Cordial, Comfortable Church
V
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The First Baptist Church
12th and Byron Sts. Arthur D. Hilton, Minister
Sunday School 9:45 A. M.
Morning Worship II A. M. Evening: Service 7:30 F. M.
Reverend A. S. Kclley. Superintendent of Baptist State Mis
sions. will oeeupy the pulpit lx-th morning and evening.
V- >
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Edgwood Methodist Episcopal Church
(Edgwood)
GREGORY BLEAKLEY, Pastor
Sunday School 9:30 A. M.?
Morning Service. "The Painless Country".' 10:45 A. M..
Lpworth League 7:30 P. if.
Evening Service. "Judgment Laid to the Line" 8:00 P. if.
Special Gospel Song Service?.Miss Hazel Seamon, directress
MAKE OCR CHURCH YOUR CHURCH
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Vance Memorial Presbyterian Church,
Woodsdale ! ?
JAMES MEASE POTTER, D. D., Minister. '
11 A. M.?"Service as a Doubt-Breaker."
?4
7 P. M.? Vesper Service in charge of the Christian Endeavor ?
Society. Meeting led by the pastor. ?? r- ^
Sundav School 9:30 o'clock -
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1
I Yet, at 7$
I He Lives
To Tell
Wonderful
Story
Hydraulic Engineer finds ?
Cure for Rheumatism I
! Affor Siiffprine' Affonies Many Years
???' W* o o
HOW IT HAPPENED !
"Eleven years ago T was In a hospi- j
tal for seven weeks. at a cost of over |
two hundred dollars For two years I
suffered torments, and winter before
last I was laid up six weeks urvier doc
tor's rare. Truly In the last twelve
years I have wanted to die, I was in
such agony. I would say. 'pood I.ord
take me rather than go through It
again." .
But now I am a new man. I am a
I better man today than I was twelve
years ago. I can almost put my leg
I over the back of my head. I could do
(that at SO. now I am 72."
Mr. Wilson, the well known Hydrau
lic Engineer, whose picture and also 1
i that of one of the blf water-power Jobs |
of which he had charge appears above,
is only one of thousands who suffered]
for years, owing to the general belief
In the old. false theory, that "I'rlc
Acid" causes rheumatism. This errone
ous belief Induced him and legions of
unfortunate men and women to take
wrong treatment*. You might Just &b
well attempt to pat out a fire with oil
at to try and get rid of pour rheuma
tism. neuritis and like complaints, oy
taking treatment supposed to drive
Uric Acid out of your blood and body.:
Many physicians now know that cric~*
Acld never did and never will cause ,
rheumatism; that it is a natural and.
necessary constituent of the blood; that
it is found in every new-horn tube, an/l,j
without It we cannot live!
It took Mr. Wilson twelve years' to *
find out this truth. He learned dow to.,
tret rid of the true cause of his rheuma
tism, and recover his strength from, '
"The Inner Mysteries." .a remarkable ?
book hat is now being distibuted free_.
by an authority who devoted Over~J
twenty years to the scientific study ot~
this malady. And Mr. Wlilaon says:
"Now I know, and I never can forget? .?
the carrier left it In my bo* and I -
came near throwing it lit the fire. But
something prompted me to look it over.
Thank God I did."
NOTE; If any reader of the Intelll-*
gencerjwishes the Book that reveals-r
these facts regarding the true cause
and treatment of rheumatism that were-,
overlooked by many doctors and scien
tists for centuries past, simply send a
post card or letter to H. P. Clearwater.
462-A..Street. Ilallowell. Maine, and it1'
will sent by return mall without
any charge whatever. Send now! Vou ,
may never get this opportunity again.
If not a sufferer yourself, hand this
good news to some afflicted friend.

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