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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, April 30, 1904, Image 1

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VOLUME I FAIR3IONT. WEST VI R<^ TXT A SAT UK DA APRIL ^>1004. NUMBER 11.
THE OR
'ADULT'S |
STORE !
ROBBED
^IHST WAHD STORE ENTERED
AND SEVENTY-FIVE DOLLARS
WORTH OF GOODS TAKEN.
THERE IS NO CLUE AS TO WHO
DID THE WORK?LOOKS LIKE
THERE WAS BUT ONE.
T. F. Hoult's store, at the east end
*of the suspension bridge, was robbed
late last night or early this morning.
As near as Mr. Hoult can estimate bis
loss, which consisted of fifteen pairs
of fine shoes, underwear, tobacco and
perhaps various other small articles,
she entire amount will aggregate (
about S"5.
The robber, or robbers, evidently
entered the Andrew Sterling lot, on
Water street, which adjoins the old
'Taylor Hotel property, followed the 1
3>ath which runs just back of the
hotel, and which terminates in the
vacant lot that separates the store"
and hotel building.
A high board fence in front of his }
lot shut off the view from Water
streeL
A ladder, which is used to ascend (
ana descend the steep riv-er bank to a
boat moored just back of the old hotel,
was appropriated and used to reach
The hack window of the store, which ,
Js about twenty feet from the ground.
ThisTJwindow was broken near the top (
-of the lower -section, and was fastened
-only by a broomstick.
Some think the job was done by-Jo- .
-seal talent, which may be the case, but
The rankest amateur in the business
would, at a glance from the bridge,
recognize the opportunities afforded
.-3. robber at this point, aud especiaily
the relative position of the arc light,
-at the end of the bridge, to the large
iistone cable pier, which causes a convenient
shadow the entire distance between
the buildings and the river.
The robber stowed his booty in 100
pound cloth coffee saclcs, one of which
he left in tlie store.
The foot-prints in the soft ground
-show that the man regained the street
-over the same route by which he enter ed.
and the impressions also indicate
that .but one man was implicated.
Wlr. Smiley Dead.
W. D. Smiley, whose illness has
/been mentioned from time to time
in the West Virginian, died to-day at
noon in his home on Walnut avenue.
Mr. Smiley was district manager of
the International School of CorreTspondence
of Scranton, Pa. He leaves
-a. wife and three children. The remains
will be shipped to his former
.iiorne at Green Castle, Pa. This is
a very sad death. The West Vircfiniaii
extends tenderest sympathy to '
the bereaved mother and little chil- ;
dren.
Heturned From Grafton.
iVllSS -Maine .Ljugcux, wuu uas wccn
nursing in Grafton for tlie past several
weeks, has returned to Fairmont.
Miss I-ogan is one of the pop- .
nlar nurses at the Coolt Hospital.
Thos. P. McCray, v.-ho passed the
civil service examination for chief electrician
in the government service, has
Saeeii notified to report at Washington,
D. C., for duty, and will leave for
that city to morrow.
Fifteen per cent reduction on all
merchandise at Jolliffe's, if you read
.their ad on last page. x
Miss Ella Mullenaux, of Rutherford,
W. Va., is the guest o fMrs. Ella Hoo?*rer
'
Harriet, the little child of Mr.
Joseph Cramer, of the Fourth ward,
fell this morning and ran a nail into
her hand. ,
Mr. 13. F. Lawler, of Boothsvilie, is
m the city. Mr. Lawler formerly
tanght in the South Side school here.
Tnsca Morris, Scott Lowe and Alli-scm
S. Fleming went, to Morgantown
last night where they attended an {nitration
held by the Phi Kappa Psi
fraternity, of which they are members.
SENSATION
CAUSED BY SPEECH OF EMPEROR
WILLIAM?OUTBURST SESERELY
CRITICISED
j
13 THE OUTCOME OF GER- J
MANY'S ISOLATION, IT IS
SAID.
i
LONDOX, April 30.?The Times today
itrints the following telegram
front its Paris correspondent:
"Emperor William's speech has
caused a profound sensation here.
Among politicians who make a specialty
of foreign questions there is much
excitement and I hear seriously discussed
to-day the possibility of war
being forced upon France by Germany
at this critical juncture,when France's
only ally in Europe is engaged else
,f hOI. \i
wuere ituu cmi i/c wi ? --? .
the Foreign offise the Emperor's outhurst
is criticised with, greater philosophy.
It is recognized to be a genera! outconic
of Germany's isolation, which is
M Dellicass's deliberate work and to
he in a sense the Emperor's recogni:ion
of this isolation. The veiled threat
of war, which the speech contains,
is looked upon by the officials as a
mere bluff, the empty fist shaking of
the disappointed suitor for French
friendship."
The speech referred to by the Times
was delivered at Karlsruhe, Baden,
on Thursday. Emperor William replying
to an address of Welcome presented
by the Chief Burgomaster, said
he hopes that the peace of the world,
would not be disturbed, that the events
which were being enacted before the
eyes of the world would steel German
courage and that liis people would be
found- united -if -ic--became -necessary
Cor Germany to intervene in world
policy.
LUCAS-HOGE.
Jliss Annie Pearl Hoge, who for the
nciot four T-00rc; hs? ?s r<=?sirlprl here with
her aunt, Mrs. S. A. Dean, was married
Inst Tuesday evening at seven
b'cloclc. at the home of her friend,
Mrs. "William R. Barrett, at "Worthinston,
Pennsylvania, to Mr. Oliver H.
Lucas, of Bethesda. Ohio. Rev. William
R. Barrett performed the ceremony.
Miss Hoge assisted at the
wedding of Rev. and Mrs. Barrett one
rear ago.
Mr. and Mrs. Lucas will reside at
Bethesda, Ohio, where they have
hosts of friends, it being Miss Hoge's
birthplace.
Fairmont has lost one of its very
best young ladies, but we congratulate
Mr. Lucas, and wish him and his fair
bride a happy future.
Y. M. C. A. MEN'S MEETING.
"Spiritual Magnetism" ? A Strong
Subject?An Attractive Speaker.
Prof. Thomas E. Hodges, of Morgantown,
one of the leading members
jl the West Virginia University will
address tne men s jiwuns
o'clock to-morrow. "Alajor" Hodges
should draw a large audience ot men.
His subject will be "Spiritual Magnetism."
Band Concert.
Program of tlic concert by the
greater Fairmont Band, on band stand,
commencing at 7:15 this evening:
No. 1. March?Fort Omaha?Farrar.
No. 2 Overture, Enchantress?
Dal hey.
No. 3. Semper Fereles?March?
Sousa.
No. 4. Waltz?Wedding of the
Winds?J. T. Hall.
No. 5. March?Chicago Tribune?Chambers.
No. C. Grand American Fantasia?
Tone ot" Pictures ol' the North and
South?Theo. Bendix.
F. J. NELSON, Director.
First in the New Hospital.
The first operations in the new
Cook Hosjiital were performed to-day.
The first was Mr. "Wilson, of Ivnoxville,
and at the time of going to
press Mrs. Smith, of "Watson, is being
operated upon.
Something new in our space; we
want to know whether it pays to advertise.
G. L. Jolliffe & Co. x
Fifteen per cent reduction on all
merchandise at Jolliffe's, if you read
their ad on last page- t x
I
SECRETARY TAFT RE!
ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY THOU J
THE OPENING OF THE L (
PURCHASE E
THE SKY WAS FAIR AND THRO f
OF ST. LOUIS. THE PLAZA
SPREAD FROM THE FA
TO THE GRAND CASCADES?REPR E
A.Mr-. nORMFR OP THE GLOBE
GJGHTS AT TH !
ST. LOUIS, April SO.?Under fair j
skies and in the presence of an iiu- j
niense audience, containing represen.- i
tatives from every corner of the earth, J
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition i
was opened formally at noon to-day. k
To be exact, at 3 minutes past 12, j
there was a sharp click of a little in- j
st:rument in the electricity and maim- j
facturers* building, and the flash of a
spark as the electric current set in
motion by the fingers of President
Roosevelt in Washington, shot over
the thousand miles of copper wire and
galvanized into life the gigantic mass
of machinery that forms such a splendid
part of the great; fair.
It was an impressive sight. An immense
throng?estimated at over 150,000
people?had passed the turnstiles,
early in the day. They gathered in the
plaza of Saint Louis, the plaza of Sr.
Anthony, and spread out over the spacious
avenues from the palace of Liberal
Arts even to the Grand Cascades.
Many were out of sight of the stately
Louisiana monument, towering 110
feet above the ground, and more were
out of hearing of the speakers who* ,
stood at its base. Bur all were patient.
There was a band concert and then ;
three solid hours of speech making.
But the eventful moment came at last
?the fruition, of six years of tirele.ss,
patient, indomitable work on the part
of officials and people. President Franris.
bare-headed, watch in hand, stood
between. Secretaries raft and Moody.
His eyes were fixed upon the distant
Hail of Festivals. The seconds ticked i
away slowly.
Was there a hitch some i>lace? Had
something gone wrong at the other
end of the line? President Francis ;
frowned, then his face lighted. A i
flag was slowly rising on the staff of
the Hall of Festivals. Little flags .
were breaking otit on a thousand little
flag staffs on a thousand eaves and
cornices and the big valaces all set in .
motion from Washington. Simultaneously
there came the whir, roar and
creak of pulleys and wheels and flying .
belts as the huge pieces of machinery
started, found themselves and sprang
into motion. And upon the grand ,
Cascades, there was a rush of water .
and a flash of flame. The Colonade
of States became a mass of lights.
Water rushed out of a myriad of orifices
in the terrace. A thousand fountains
began to play.
The immediate throng stood silent,
a nionient. impressed by the beauty of j
the scene, then a cheer arose and j
spread out o-. er the grounds. The J
Louisiana Purchase Exposition was ac I
complished?it was a fact.
True there remains much to he done
before the big. show is complete in
every detail. All the main palaces
are finished, but workers are busy on
the Pike and will he for two weelfs.
Many of the State buildings are in
t{te hands of the carpenters yet. In
Machinery Hail and in the varied industries
and fine arts buildings every- '
thing is complete. iri the other palaces,
many exhibits hate yet to he installed.
But what is in, is well worth
the admission and before one can see
it all the remainder will be completed.
The exercises which preceded the '
actual setting in motion of the machinery.
were impressive. The officers
and directors of the exposition, the
board of lady managers, representativc-s
of foreign governments, officials
of States and Territories and representatives
of the Army and Navy assembled
at the Administration Building
and marclied to the plaza of Saint
Louis. The lady managers marched
too. Tliey wanted carriages, but the
hard-hearted exposition officials, who
were forced by Congress to give up
$100,000 to the lady managers to be
used by them to entertain their
friends, compelled the lady managers
to walk or hire their own carriages.
In the shadow of the monument of
< cCr'.-v-..t", &
PRESENTS PRESIDENT /
5AND PEOPLE TODAY WITNESSED
ONG TALKED OF LOUISIANA
XPOSITION.
4GS GATHERED IN THE PLAZA
OF ST. ANTHONY. AND
kLACE OF LIBERAL ARTS
: I t
SENTATIVES FROM EVERY NOOK !
ARE NOW SEEING THE
E GREAT SHOW.
j R
St. Louis, after whom St. Louis was
named, tlie officials and guests mount- |
fed the rostrum. President Francis in- j
froduced Rev. Frank \V. Gunsalaus, of i
Chicago, who offered the invocation. |ln
tjFherL President Francis taid in part: j I"
"A great thinker has said, 'The son- j
timent from which it springs deter- 1
mines the dignity of any deerl.' ,n
"This universal exposition was con- w
coived in a sense of obligation on the
part of the people, of the Louisina al
Purchase, to give expression to tlieir u
gratitude for the innumerable blessings
that have flowed from a century 01
of membership in the American Union.
to manifest their appreciation of the l''
manifold henefits of living in a land
whose climate and soil and resources
are unsurjiassed, and of having tlieir v<
lots cast in an age when liberty and
enlightenment are established on fottii- 'z
dations broad and deep, and are the Kl
heritage of all who worthily strive. !^'
"Discouragements were frequent "
enough, but were never disheartening, S1
and are now all forgotten. We reniemher
only the words of cheer and com- '''
"tor elation,. the patient consideration
given to what was often looked upon
as misdirected enthusiasm, hut which v<
was persisted in. and almost invariably
converted indifference or skept.i- ''
cisni into helpful and active interest.
"The Uoui.-iana Purchase Exposition.
w
he'd in commemoration of.the acqtiisit
ion of an empire by a deed cf the
pen, salutes the representatives, exec- tJ
utive and legislative of the Federal _
Government, and tenders most pro- ^
found thanks for the recognition extended
and assistance rendered.
"It acknowledges obligation to o..
States and Territories and foreign m
countries for co-operation and contribution,
and makes its obeisance to
commissioners and exhibitors. oj
"Open ye gates! Swing wide ye par- n,
tals. Enter herein ye sons of men, n]
and behold the achievements of your S)
race. Eearn the lesson here taught n,
and gather from it inspiration for j?
still greater accomplishments." tj
At the conclusion of his address. S|
President Francis received the keys hi
of the exposition from Treasurer rr
Thompson and Director of the Works n
Taylor. w
The exhibit. palaces were transferred w
next to the director of the Exhibit tl
Skiff, and a chorus of ,'JOO voices b
isang the "Hymn of the West." k
Mayor Wells, of St. Eouis, was next
introduced, arid said: "Twenty- ti
eight years ago there was inaugurated w
in the city of Philadelphia the Cen- Si
tennial Exposition, in commemoration
of the completion of the first century
of our national existence.
w
"Now, on this 30th day of April, w
190-1, we are assembled to commemo- ^
rate the 1 OOtli anniversary ot that his- torical
achievement?the purchase of
the Louisiana territory, and as evidence
of greater maturity, we are celebrating
as 80,000,000 of united Americans.
occupying prosperous States j,
and five Territories.
t hie- nnmhfr are the States g
which are located within the boundaries
of the Louisiana purchase, the c
chief of 'which is the city of St. Louis,
which I have the honor of representing
on this occasion.
"We bid a most cordial welcome" to
all nations. We thank our-national \J
and State governments, we thank the jr
rulers of foreign countries; we thank l
i he individual exhibitors, for the honor y
conferred upon our municipality j
through through their participation s
in this exposition. Above all, we rev- .
erently acknowledge the kind favor
of heaven, which has so smiled, upon j;
this, our great undertaking." y
He was followed by Senator Thomas
H. Carter, president 01 me j^a.uuuai
Commission; Representatives James ti
A. Taivney and Edward H. Harrlman, |s
(Continued on 4th page.)
a
;losing |i
exercises |
HIS WAS THE COMMENT CF ALL
PERSONS PRESENT AT NORMAL
SCHOOL BUILDING I f
LAST NIGHT.
- j
AIN DID NOT KEEP INTERESTED !
FRIENDS AWAY ALTHOUGH j.1
MANY STAYED AWAY ON t
THAT ACCOUNT. jv
t
At the Normal auditorium ln.st. even- j v
.g a large number of visitors was i
Ggent at the completing exercises t.
the Second ward grammar school, f
it hough the weather was somewhat i
clement a large number of persons e
ere in attendance, which proves n
.at the people are manifesting it keen '|
id zealous interest in educational t
ork. g
The program was pleasing and each o
le performed his part in a com- n
enclable manner, especially when v
.e tender years of youth, with the v
"e and patriotism of riper years, i
appled with subjects such as "Do- h
jlopment of Our State" by Master d
larles Meredith, and "Labor Organ- t
ations" by Ernest Roy Bell. Both <*
ibjects were full of pathos, well ren- a
reel and loudly applauded; also "Our q
avy," by Joint Calvin Burcliinal, who p
nail in stature and young in years 7
tndled his subject with the voice of o
future statesman.
The X young ladies ^ too. jierf or mod
loir parts well, and their sweet
lices mingled in song, seemed to
rul enchantment to all who heard
leir melodies. j ^
Two, whose names appeared on the j j.
"Ogram, Could not attend ay they
ere sick and unable to take p#.rt in J
lis pleasant program.
Miss Martha iJrown read a paper on (I
ic life and character of the late l'
rancis Pierpont, which will he found v
sported in full in this paper.
All present seemed to enjoy the
'ening, and after closing die pro- 13
ram Prof. 13. A. Hunt, Principal, r
ade a short and very appropriate u
icech in presenting the grammar v
ass, after which Supt. Rosier spoke
the class and its work and advance- n
ent, and urged that each pupil study
inch at home to keep up' with his n
tidies, in order to be progressive and p
:)t forget during vacation what has l<
:>en accomplished up to the present;
ml too often it occurs that pupils
,udy hard to rise, and reach great c
eighLs, but through neglect and the n
managements, pleasures and entice- p
icnts incident to living in a city e
ith such attractions, soon forget 1
hat they have learned; hence, when s
ley resume their studies in the school *s
ave forgotten most all they ever e
new. ^
Pro f. Rosier then presented- cer ?
flcat.es to those who were found ?
orthy of advancement to a higher
rade. 13
_ v
Band Concert. ii
Weather permitting, Junkins' band g
ill entertain the people of Fairmont c
J.K nrnoTQ rn nt flio h
/atson Hotel comer this evening at h
: 30. li
"Itochambeau," March?G. Alter. n
Overture, Vigenta?Losey.
Scand'lus Duins?Frank Keeble. c
"Forget-lie Not" Waltzes?Ellis n. s
rooks. a
Hutchinson t'ommandery March? o
amuel Stephens. r
A Whispered Thought (Novelette;? is
has. r.. Johnson. E
"Dixie Girl"?J. Bodewalt Lamp. a
e
Longitude and Time. c
An Interesting little question in r
ongitude and Time comes in concern- r
ig the pressing of the button at St.
ouis to-day. The President was ir. "
,'ashington and pressed the button at v
: 15, hut it started the machinery at ii
t, Louis at 12:03, central time. s
a
Mrs. Nellie Sweeney Palmer and g
r: ? Ottroonmr Taff voctprdnv fnr ll
LIS.1 r\UOC kj ?v 1/V.nv; J _
.'heeling. n
n
Ed Spring, a young carpenter of t
lis city, ran a nail into liis foot and Is
i very sick from the effects of it. ii
Mr. Fenton- 'r&Sni has returned from , ?
trip to Grafton.X^-. 1
CHICAGO
PARTMENT
S ENTIRELY INADEQUATE, SAYS
W. H. JOHNSON, GENERAL
INSPECTOR
V ; ...
'OR THE NATIONAL BOARD OF
UNDERWRITERS?ROTTEN
PAVEMENTS A MENACE. - :
CHICAGO. III., April 30.?Wm. If. ;; ;;
ohn?on, general Inspector for the Naionnl
Board of Fire Underwriters, ;i
vhii pur in si;.- weeks investigating
ho Chicago fire department, the city
rater department and their auxliarles
affectlug the tiro insurance of
ho city. has made his report. He
inds: That the present (Ire fighting
orce is inadequate numerically,, its
qulpment insufficient and the dopnrtnent
as a whole on the down grade.
"hat i ho down town, cr congested dis
rict is in danger of a serious eonflaration.
That the merchants and
wnors of buildings are careless and
.eglect to avail themselves of the
arions precautionary devices with >1
,-hich their buildings . are equipped.
"hat the present water facilities are
ehind tlie times. That conditions
emand the immediate installment ot she
high-pressure system. That an
normous per centage of water mains
re too small in diameter for the re
uiroments. That Chicago's rotten
avomonts are a decided menace.
'hat physically incapacitated men are
11 the force.
The Water Committee.
Wc liar! inteTrded xo give an account '
f the report of the water committee
r the Council meeting last night, but
ho following communication covers
he cnae.?(Ed.
klitor West Virginian: Last
night I attended tlie Council
meting and heard the waterworks
nestlon discussed. Now I was glad
o liour this question taken up as it
as made a political issue in the last
ity campaign, has been the subject
f numerous editorials In the local
apers, has caused councilmon to beatc
each other and even the street
rchins have taken up the cry, "Waterworks
for sale!"
Now 1 believe that our councilmon.?
lost of them at least?are men to be '
rusted. From among these counclllen
a water committee has been apointed.
The Council has contracted
o have a new system of waterworks : ij
uilt. As a matter of course, the
'ater committee would have some , - '
ontrol over the constructing of the
cw works. This committee is co'aiosed
of men who will vacate wtjmver
lliere are better meu to take
heir places. After the works were
farted Councilman George IJilly was
ent ouL to look after the city's inter
sts. He sayS that the chairman of
ho water commitee told the contractits
not to pay any attention to his
rders.
* w * ? llllf
fSOW It Tilclt DC U'Uf, i CdU MUV i/UI.
raise the chairman for it. Any one /ho
lias ever been at Council meet- '
igs knows how much unnecessary
rumbling comes from the chair of
Councilman Lilly. If that is the way v'U
e acted at the waterworks (and it
i likely that lie did), if he had been
stencil to we would never have any .
ew waterworks.
At the meeting last night the Counil
took li)) the question. There it was
hown that all the differences were
djustod except as to the classification
f a certain siate. If it is classed as .
ock, one price is to be paid, and if it
i not rock, another price is to be paid,
toth sides are willing to arbitrate,
nd the water committee was empowred
to act in the matter. The order, ;
ausing all works to be stopped, was ;
escinded, and the contractors are
eady to begin work at once. There
has been a great deal of
fuss" made over fills question, but
.lien investigated it amounts to noth- :ig.
We want the use of the new
ystem and want work resumed on it
t once. But as soon as the work be- its
ins wo will hoar cries of the city's
ebt, the little brick house and all
tanner of things that amount to
othing. If the people who are the auhors
of these "false alarms," will ;; !
indly tighten the brake on the wheels
i their disordered brains, they wilt
erve their country better In the tuure
than they have iti the past. v

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