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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 05, 1904, Image 6

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THE CASE OF " !
: ELSIE ALBIN!
* DETECTIVE RATTtEDGE REVIEWS |
CONFESSION OF MRS MARY
POWELL, WHO IS CHARGED
WITH MURDERING
HER ADOPTED
DAUGHTER.
MRS. POWELL'S HUSBAND AND
THE GIRL WERE SAID TO BE
CRIMINALLY INTIMATE.
A NOTED TRIAL.
4*;' DOVER. Del.. May 1.?Detective j
if; Rattletilje was called to the stand j
when the trial of Mrs. Mary A. Row- i
ell, charged with the murder of her :
adopted daughter, Elsie Albin, was re- ;
. st'.med this morning. . Rattledge went j
over her confession while being cross
examined.
He told of -Mrs. Powell's first confession,
which was:
"After I put my dinner por on, pu'
the meat in it. then I picked tip
some empty catsup bottles and glass j
fruit jars ancl took them up in the gar !
ret. Elsie Albin came up there, f :
afaked her what she wanted, ami she I
grumbled out something i could '.tot.!
understand, and she looked so ill. as if i
she would do something to me if she .
had a chance. 1 hit her three times j
with a catsup bottle. The first time :
1 hit her right on the right side, just i
above the ear, and she turned around
and i hit her on the left side, and
rher> she went down on her knees and
then I hit her on the back of the !
head. She then fell over on her face j.
and i caught her by the shoulders. '
Then I took that knife out of my pock- j
et. I had it to rip some of my sew- |
ing. I then cut her throat. I did not j
. y cut her any place intentionally. 1
}, * / can't remember just how many times I
J' I did hit her."
Rattledge admitted that Mrs. Pov-j
ell said she owned all trie property j
and that was why she could not leave ;
.iome. Time and time again, after :
finding that her husband and the girl '
were criminally intimate, she drove
her away, but Powell brought her
back.
Appeal To The Irish.
; The Irish Roman Catcholic arch- j
g" bishops and bishops have drawn up !
- - an address on the "Emigration Ques-|
"- lion." to be issued to the Irish in j
bp ; America. It reads: "The greatest i
danger threatening Ireland to-day is ;
7: the danger of the extinction of the j
Irish race within her own shores, j
For now nearly CO years the How of j
emigration has gone on continually, I
til] the population is reduced '> one- !
half of what it was before the famine.
In the short space of the last
20 years, according to the report oi
the CoinirtissiORer-Genoral of Iinmi- i
"gration at Washington, no hthan [
.910,000 men and women emigrated ;
from Ireland to the United States |
e;- alone. Of tliese 7 55, Odd, or S.-'. per |
cent., Were in the prime of life?! >
hveen the ages of 15 and ::r, years,
and in Ireland at the last census ih-.whole
number of persons of these
ages was only one and one-half millions,
so that the loss of her young
population to one country alone in the
last 20 years was fully one-half of
the present adult population in the.
prime ot life. This enormous withdrawal
of the most vigorous portion
of tlie nation has had its natural results.
The native population is steadily
falling; ;.:-e marriage and birth
rates are the lowest of any civilized
country; lunacy is increasing to an
alarming degree, and the scarcity of
labor is felt in many branches of agriculture.
Thereover, while the stream
of Irish emigration sets toward, the
West, there is a steady, silent lnllux
of foreigners, why are constantly constituting
themselves the dominant
commercial and industrial interests.
At the census of 1901 the foreign-born
ipppulaiion of the country increased
by nearly 1;>,*j*in ih^ decennial period.
If this double process of emigration
and 'planting* be allowed to
continue; it is obvious that the native
Irish will soon be entirely supplanted
in their own land by people of other
races.' The address goes on to
point oat the better prospects there
are. for Irish people to remain in their
own country, owing to the change in
the Land Laws, etc.. and winds up
with an earnest appeal to the IrishAmerican
and Catholic press ro educate
public opinion on this vital 'pier.tion.
and to the Irish-American bish
op.s and clergy to ask their people I
not to assist emigration from Ire- :
land.
Settlement May Be Effected.
NEW HAVEN, Conn.. May I.?Con- j
ferences between the New Have- i j
Company and a committee representing
the machinists employed on the
entire system, were resumed this afternoon.
The opinion prevails among
the men that a settlement will he effected.
Delegates from the Car Workers
began arriving here this afternoon.
The delegates expect a hearing tomorrow.
The blacksmiths and steam
fitters and helpers and machinists'
" helpers will be the next in line for
, a conference. These conferences
may prove final.
j
CATS SUCKING BREATH. ^
Ln OIil Pii5)I(; That Jin* Served |
it Good i'lirj'-o-'c.
Can ^ cat really suck ike breath of a i
'ir.iid?
Wo have always. heard that it could, j
Away back iri early childhood we dls- j Ai
tinetiy remember frequent warning i
to look out for the cm. lb* not allow j
the cat to get into bed with yon. ospe- ?
dially to' get into bed with the? baby, as!
it is liable to suck the baby's breath, j
which would cause the baby to die. I
Is there any foundation for such a j
notion as this? Wo never eouM discov- j
or any real menni Jig to the belief that j ',J~J
a cat can suck the breath of a chil l.' VJ
Indeed the sentence is totally uniu nl-; at
ligible. j th
What is meant by suck in,a: the breath? i te
It may be true that the cat. attracted!
by the breath of a child who had re-1 ; ..
cently been nursing, might attempt to j .^
interfere in some manner with the j j
child's mouth. In young cats the
2>i]lse to nurse might be excited by the|TIf
smell of the child's breath. It is bare-j
]y possible that the cat might be seized j tii
with a desire to bite or to devour the j is
child's Hps or tbfigue. lured on by the j rn
tioTi to deny those possibilities. Maybe ,ir
they are true.
But not any of these suppositions fur- c*
nish a basis for tlie statement that the }
cat is JiabJe to suck the child's breath. vV
We luive always heard this statement 1 ^
with a shudder of horror. It seems to ta
convey some weird, horrible tragedy st
that can hardly be imagined. But it is T;,
n mere fancy, the origin ol' which is
hard to explain. i
Yet we would advise mothers to he I
careful about leaving the infant with i
a cat. We do not favor the idea of
cats sleeping? with children, nor do wo
favor the practice of children playing
with cats, handling tliem. mopping
them around the floor, fondling them,
dressing them up as dolls. It is not
good for the cat; it is not good for the
child. Neither cats nor dogs ought to
be treated in this manner. They are
all right in their place, but they are
not lit for playthings.
If the superstition that a cat can
suck a child's breath has operated as I'1
a preventive to mothers allowing their sc
children to play with cats, it has served a:
a very good* purpose, but such childish (jE
notions are hardly compatible with ma- to
ture reflection. It is one of the old .
wives* fables which may have served
a good purpose, but it is too' ridiculous ctI
for repetition. There are anil
better reasons why the cat ami bub.v
should not be left together in.:;; the fir
vaycuo, umnteiiJ^inK' Lear ti.ar uic oat
will suck the child's breath.?Medical
Tail:.
'l'Jif f'are of Cliilclnvs. j ^
It is usually arc pi oil without < iiicstion
that the modern sclcntitie t :ethotls
used in the care and hr'nrging up
of infants tend to increase the average
duration of htiuian life. Mr. Chariton
T. I.ewis, writing in Harper*:; Weekly. ^
presents a different: view. \Vh;,-i infahts
were treated with I . - wisdom. ,K
lie ppinis out. the .veilla : perished mrl "v 1
the stronger survive,!. \V!;c:i tin' sick Ft
aro cared for so that a lsrve number Th
recover from disease, it is Inevitable jo;
that on the average thoro vh ere thus so
:nunity to. which ikey are resi >re.l. j" ^
Thus all tlK"-o in'Iii.uie- a. .Mr.
I.: wis in conclusion, while saving: life.
especially t ? sr.'O lives which
are l'oehio in a aTentor /..porti >n th.ai
th .se which": re sii-.--.na :ri I tlr:.-; in t!ie hti
end must 1 sw-r the 'h-iiity of the fo
tJi*e:tt tur.s .1" the T;?.;j::ago::." sa
_ _ pa
I *i clays when tavern brawls in ICng- j1(
land were freey,lent a:: 1 s-.--.er1> were
on: on the sligrluost: \ : >v.->.-r i! .n com
mors fairness demanded that the blades ^
of eku::;v cm, J.y f:i ,,;s should be of is
oqun 1 1. mirth. In a sudden : !'!':\\y so
there would be no thought <f me: Sc
in;.; swordsJ so the authorities took the
mutter into their own Uatuls at. tin*
u.'itrs f?l' the city of London. where
every gallant wns liable to lie challenged.
find if the public olsicial found
any blade beyond thirty-six inches !)!
the smith stood by t > snap < :Y the steel re
to the rerjrJred length. In yue. ;i V.)\z- en
abeth's reijyn this was the < omuion j.,i
I>r.-otif<-.
Ilrtrjtd.
Freshly made bread is more indigestible
than stale bread because it is fd
more i it and becomes more solid y r
in the mouth: hence more iinp'-aotra- la
hie to th.e saliva and the yastrie juices. ni
For the same reason broad crust is j u..
more digestible than what is beneath i J
it, being' drier. Tlread may l.?c unlit !
for use from hoing made of adulterat- ! 'Ut
ed or too old Hour, hv turning: sour or | ce
developing a bitter taste from the J -a
vc->s:t fv.im uwUUi- .. i. U tV,..o !
insufficient fermentation in the rising | pc
process, which leaves it too heavy for | jv
tho digestive fluids to net well upon. .
'j* j
Karriins: ;? Sniinktii^:.
r, r , in
Mrs. Ilruwn?I was downtown yesterday.
I didn't know but I mi id it 1 e
meet you. Mrs. Greene?I was down- sl
town, too, and I'm awfully sorry I
dicln't see you. Little Johnny Greene? by
Ma, don't you remember we saw Mrs. j si<
Rrown's (log and you said: "Come, let's i f(,
hurry away from here. That old cat ; m
must be somewhere near." "What old
-.i-T .. t n
cat did vou mean, ma?
! Pt
.Vxi Invitation Aooepte?l.
"No, I never carry my watch when avj
I go out," she said artlessly. "I am so i gr
n.r.nian't KA co fr? Win- [
a person could steal anything riclit w;
from under my nose, and I wouldn't m
miss it." Then the young man by her ^
side stole a kiss, and she didn't seem '
to miss It. 10
w;
The birds' nests used for soups are co
little gelatinous things made up prfnei- an
pally from the eaiiva of tiny birds of se
China. Q _ mi
EdunufooT FpjBreU With Cucanu. al
Candy Catt>aa*leiMto constipation foroyer. ne
toe. 25c. 11 c c cik: , |sbssu ftfima nEJj
NGINEERS LEAVE !
FOR COLON!M
? R I CANS WILL ASSUME CON- |
" FIOL OF PROPERTY ACQUIRED :
BY THE UNITED STATES? , .
FRENCH LABORERS WILL
BE RETAINED.
".YA3KINGTOX, May 5.?General
:o. \V. Davis. Governor of the Panne.
Canal Commission, accompanied
r a corps of American engineers,
ill leave next Tuesday and on arrival ,
Colon v.'ill assume entire control of .
e property just acquired by the Uni- '
d States.
"'The laborers now employed there ,
the French company, of whom
ere are auuui i,iuu iuiu >v xiu nav<;
ien working under American direcjn
for the past year in the excava- ^
m of the Culebra cut. will be conluerl
These are acclimated and it.
not the intention of the Cana! CorniS3ion
to import any large number
Americans to work on the cana)
itil sanitary precautions have been
ken and a good water supply seirecl
for Panama. This important
ork will be the first undertaken by
e General. In the meantime, d'eiled
plans and specifications for conruction
purposes on the various sec- 1
>ns of the canal will be prepared by
e engineers for submission to con- .
actors.
MOST DARING :
C
~ 1
i NAVAL HISTORY WAS THE. AT
TEMPT BY JAPANESE TO ^
SOTTLE UP PORT f
ARTHUR. ?
\
ST. PETERSBURG, May 5.?A c
ess telegram from Port Arthur tie- ~
ribes the last attempt of the Japicse
to bottle up the port, on Alon- ?
iy last, as unparalleled in naval his- t
ry for its daring*. The crews from ?
e fircsliips were composed of Jap- c
tese naval cadets, who acted with t
e greatest bravery and most desper- ?
e valor in the face of a murderous
e.
DOUBLE MURDER
1
a Farm house?Attempt to Burr; ^
House Followed.
<
OhEAN, AT. Y.. May L?A double *
urder occurred last, night in a farm j :
>use about four miles from Ange- r
;a Village, Allegheny county. John %
in Gorder and his half sister, Anna '
irnliam, were found on the floor dead
is morning by a farmer named
co, who had gone there to borrow
mething. Miss Farnham, who kept
arise for her brother, had been stab-1
^.1- T!,.. f.r-il- ;
'I ill LUf ija.sj.jx. iuu wuuuu ? uo i
a tie by a file, which was found on a
e iioor. a
Van Gorder had been killed by a t
diet. Upon looking about, Rice t<
unci that: the house had been ran- y
cited. A pile of partially burned a
.per on the kitchen floor gave evi- v
nee of an attempt to burn the i
nise. t
There were tracks of hob-nail a
oes on the floor and porch. Them ?
no cine yet. The murdered per- t
11s were a brother and sister of ex- P
r.aror Van Gorder, of Buffalo.
n
a
Why Popcorn Pops Out White. a
Why does xiopcorn pop? Most peoe
probably have wondered what the 1
ason is, but only recently lias sci- 1
ce taken up the ouostion and iurnaed
an answer. Popcorn pops be- n
use of the expansive power of
earn.
A grain of popcorn is a receptacle ?
led with tightly packed starch
ains. lis interior is divided into a L
rgo number of cells, each of which ''
ay be regarded as a tiny box. with rilis
strong" enougdi to resist consul- c
ablr> press-ire from within. When 1
sat is applied the moisture is con rted
into steam, which finally o.s- 0
pes by explosion.
In order to secure a satisfactory 1
?pping there is required an extremehigh
heat, which causes most of
e cells to explode simultaneously,
ic grain of corn then turns literally V
side out and is transformed into a
lat.ively large mass of snow-white
arch, hcautiful to the eye.
Though gaining so largely in bulk ^
popping the grain of corn loses con- i
lerablv in weight. It has been 0
und that' 100 average grains of un- p
>pped corn weigh ID grams, whereas u
e same number of grains after pop- t
ng weigh only 11 grams. The dif- a
rence is the weight of evaporated
ater originally contained in the corn
ains.
If the popcorn is old and dry it
ill not pop well. At best a few cells t?ar
the center of the grain will
irst, and the result is not satisfac- ^
ry. At the base of the kernel,
here the latter is attached to the IV
b, the cells appear to be driest, a
id it is noticed that these cells are v
ldom ruptured in the popping. it
ay be that this is why popcorn is r'
ways preserved on the cob and c
:ver "shucked" for the market. w
~ " RED HAT j
HAY GO TO ARCHBISHOP IRE- ]
LAND OR RYAN?DECISION
EXPECTED IN JUNE.
ROME, -May ?Pope Pins X, re
living fresh recommendations for
he creation of another American
Cardinal at the next consistory, -.olay
stated that he would not tah*e any
termite action until he had conferred
vjth Archbishop Falconio, Apostolic
ielegate at Washington. The Arch>
is hop is expected in Rome in June,
fiie present indications are that
ihould another cardinal be created,
he Red Hat will go to either Arch>
I shop Ireland or Ryan.
JAPAN'S BRAVE WOMEN.
srouc! if Their Sons Are Killed Fighting
ir? Eattle.
The women of the Mikado's kiuslom
will figure more prominently In
ho Eastern war than is generally i:uigined.
Alas, they will suffer most!
Though small in stature, like the
Tien, the .Japanese wives ami maiden-.;
ire brave and patriotic. In time of
var they do not shirk the new duties
reposed upon them. Many thousands
>f them \vill be found close to the
battlefields in the role of nurses and
general helpmates to the ,wounded
mtl sick.
The patriotism of these women, ac
wording; to the testimony of those who
lavo observed their mode of life, is
)1" the highest order. Indeed, a
Prominent missionary states they arte
bven more patriotic than American
vomen. However that may be, all
orrner American residents of Japan
igree that when a war breaks out the
vonien, like the men, lay aside all so;ial
differences and are united for the
;cod of the common cause.
It is difficult for foreigners to underhand
(he depth of the patriotism of
he Japanese women, because it is
ome thing more than mere love of
:oimtry, being part of the reverence
hey have for their ancestors and for
i history that antedates the Christian
ira. This patriotism has been stylo;!
'the spirit of Japan."
A Japanese mother, for illustration,
s more proud than grieved if her son
q iirnnfhl- 1mm o d *?ad from a war.
To her it is an honor that her son
las died for his country.
It. is related that the mother of
'cmrnandcir Sakamoto, who was kill >
on the bridge of his ship at the
>attle of the Yah: in IS'fM, received j
he news of his death with these j
vords: "Tell the Emperor I am glad
i son of mine could be of some serice
to him."
Such patriotism is inextinguishabh.
?Boston Globe. v |
Many men know how to get a wife,
tit not ail men. know how to treat
nd keep her. There is no room for
.rgumeii t on this point, no more than
here is that all men. should know how
o treat a woman. The youth, the
oitng man, the husband, the father,
,nd the confirmed old bachelor each
rill find it will be worth his while
o study the method of Lord Bum ley,
he dear Mummy in "The Mummy
nd the Humming Bird," which Mr.
>aul Gilmore will present to-night at
he Grand. It is the sweetness of the
lay, its. genuine human nature, its
eal living, breathing, human _and liu- | j
laiie characters which have made it
universal success. Love and courge
are its hypothesis, and these apical
to all, young and old. male and
emaie. sir cmarie.s \v/>?a.ici:ji luuiv i
woiidon by storm with this play. l\Ir.
ohn Drew made the greatest hit of
is career with it. and Mr. Paul Gil
tore is not only reaping golden opin3iis,
but actually testing the capacity '
f all theatres in which lie appears.
The Mum my and the Humming
>ird" is a play which no one can aford
to miss seeing. Tt is a modern
omecly in which the unexpected is
ontinually making its appearance; a
aasterpiece of stage craft, presented ;
3- a company .of artists, and staged
-i tli a completeness of detail such ins
tnly ihondon and Xow York prod no- ]
ions enjoy.
AT ST. LOUIS i,
V'iJJ th.e Portrait of the Empress Be
Exhibited.
W ASHIXCTOX. D. (\ Mav -I.?
linister Conger, at Pekin, informs ,
he State Department that the portrait (
f the Empress Dowager of China,
ainted by an American artist and ,
Itirnately intended as a present t-> J
his country, will first be exhibited j
t the St. Louis Exposition. I
I
I
Attended the Dance.
i
A jolly crowd of young people from \
his city attended the dance given .
y the Conkle School of Dancing at t
he Coliseum at Mononvub last night,
lusic was furnished by Profs. Shaw _
nd Huxley. Special arrangements ^
?ere made for a car to wait, and the
egister showed 29 fares collected
oming down. A very enjoyable time
7&B had by all present.
SAFES LOAN^ED^ T(
^ save.
HOME SAVIN
IF YOU ft AM
TO BUY A HOME,
BLILD A HOME. OR j J-1
ELY REAL ESTATE
FOR SPECULATION,
See f-kirr flDout it.
I have, or can get. what you want and
save you money on it.
? .
Mu Services are Free ,
To the buyer, and when you buy Real ne?
Estate through me vou are certain of Incl
i'av
getting the am
Besi Property
on tne Marker x Tl
AT THE LOWEST PRICE.
- c
"PUT MONEY INTO THY PURSE." Au
HOW ?
ASK HARR ABOUT IT.
322 1-2 Main Street. I
StoriiiiQ Silver! |i
Wc ! a
I acti
Are v
1
Showing ?
T1
a Very Complete
Line of Ca
Su
Sterling
Silverware
Suitable for J
Wedding and Anniversary
Presents.
.T. I
' Ber
RiHELDRFFER g
k BROWNFIELD. "1
and
8altimore&Ohio %
RAILROAD. &
OASSENGER. trains will arrive at
J- and depart from Fairmont on the Piti
following' schedule on and after Xovember
22d. 1903*
ave st bound.
Xo. 7.?Chicago Express. 3:2S a. m. *ie
N'o. 5.?"Wheeling- Accommodation
7:47 a. m.
Xo. -"3.?Wheeling X: Cin"innati
Express. 7:29 p. m.
Xo. 71. ? Wheeling- Accommodation
1:36 p. sr.
east bound. A. ]
Xo. 8.?Few York. Baltimore
and Washington
Express. 3:35 a. m.
Xo. 72.?Grafton Accom'n 10:53 a. m.
Xo. 46.?Few York. Balti- . .
more and Washington
Express. 1:48 p. m. J- 1"
Xo. 4.?Grafton Accom'n S:38 p. M. L. (
F., H. AND P. BRANCH.
arrives. d
Xo. 50.?Pittsburg Accom'n 1:00 p. m.
Xo. 4.?Pittsburg Accom'n 9:45 p. m. -1 Pc
departs. pos
Xo. 3.?Pittsburg Accom'n 7:50 a.m.
i __ a o.m-a ->r
No. 09 leaves daily for Morgan town r.,.
it 9:05 p. M. No. 02 arrives from Mot- HI
rantown at 6:55 a. m.. daily except Sunlay
: at S:00 a. m. Sunday only.
l>I V(sio \
Co. 5.?Arrives at Fairmont 5:35 p. m.
Co. 1.?Arrives at Fairmont 12:10 p. ax.
Co. 3.?Arrives at Fairmont 7:45 a. m.
Co. 2.?Leaves Fairmont... 7:10 a.m. Geo
Co. 6.?Leaves Fairmont... 1:53p. ax. Geo
Co. 4.?Leaves Fairmont. .. 9:50 p.m. j j
All trains are daily except Nos. 3
ind 4 on the F., M. and P. branch,
ehieh are daily except Sunday. D
For sleeping car Reservations and son,
nformation concerning- tickets and Hav
ates, consult
T. L. Henderson,
Ticket Agent. " A
ceiv
Blodgett tfe Fields,
PHOTOGRAPHERS
, : Inte
. Will Treat You Riflht. iau
iA/hero? Carr Building. and
0 DEPOSITORS.
opens a Savings account,
/ou the safe. We keep the
ccounts draw four per cent,
e being compounded semijet
a safe. It will help you
GS BANK.
lis Bank 01 Fairmont
FAIRMONT, W. VA.
E WATSON. President.
.1. S. HAYBEN, Vice President.
WALTON MILLER. Cashier.
Capita!, SI50.000.00.
Undivided Profits. SIOO.OGO.OO
DIRECTORS:
A. B. Fleming-. J. S. Hayden.
J. E. Watson.
iH. L. Hutchinson. F. E. Nichols,
0, S. McKinnev. C. E. Manley.
'l-acsauts a general banking busi5.
recounts of corporations, firms and
ividuals received upon the most
orable terms consistent with sound
1 conservative banking,
nterest paid on time deposits,
ieparate vault with safety deposit
ces for use of customers.
ie Monongaliela Bank of
Fairmont.
ipened for business July 15, 1903.
thorlzed Capital, - $50,000.
OFFICERS.
R. E. HARP,, President.
I. L. BUTCHER. Vice President.
HUGIT F. SMITH, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
E. Watson. R. E. Harr,
D. Robinson, C. L. Barnes,
B. Sivearingen, B. F. Gaskins,
B. L. Batcher.
. general banking- business transed.
'our business is solicited.
kinking room, Market street. First
d.
Le First National Bank
ot* Fairmont, W. Va.
pital Stock, - $100,000.00
rplus and Undivided
Profits, - 165,000.00
;ignated Depositary of the United
:ates and State of West Virginia.
d. HARTLEY. President.
Hod. A. B. FLEMING,
Vice President.
JOS. E. SANDS, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
J. Hartley, Hon. A. B. Fleming,
ij. D.-Fleming. Win. E. Watson,
Jos. E. Sands.
bartered as State Bank in 1851.
rganized as National Bank in 1865.
echartered as National Bank in
>.
rants business based on balances
responsibility,
ollects on all points,
ells domestic and foreign exchange,
ays interest on special deposits,
ustomers" private boxes taken care
n our fire and burglar proof vault
'V'A 1J. U.
izens' Dollar Savings Bank,
FAIRflONT, W. VA.
med for business Groundhog Day?
February 2d. 1903.
PITAL STOCK - $100,000.00.
OFFICERS :
L. LEHMAN. J. A. CLARK,
President. Vice President.
J. 11. LINK, Cashier
DIRECTORS :
h. Lehman, J. A. Clark,
5. Hart. J. F. Cook,
1. Powell. C. AV. Swisher,
\V. H. Nicholson, Jr.
oes a general banking- business.
x Cent. Interest Paid on Savings Dents.
It's What You Save, Not What
You Earn. That Makes Wealth.
e People's Bank of Fairmont,
W. Va.
CAPITAL STOCK,
$200,000.00.
rge IU. .Jacobs President
rge DeBoit Cashier
[. Brownfield... .Assistant Cashier
irectors?G. II. Jacobs, S. L. WatJ.
M. Hartley, Harry Shaw, W. S.
mond and C. E. Hutchinson.
II business intrusted to us will ree
prompt and careful attention.
SOLICIT YOUR ACCOUNTS.
rest paid on time deposits. Vault
ee to customers for private boxes
papers.

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