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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 05, 1904, Image 7

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' '' ' '
JUNKINS &
LOSS OF
Mr. G. L. Hendersc
. his horse INS
Stockmen's Inde
.March 15th : on the 21st d
horse died and on the 23rd
FULL for the LOSS.
1A/F represen
ww Ebb and wo
INSURE
JunKins an
GENERAL II
Corner Room Court House.
COMING
6ouahanour <
REFI
Vaudevil
Fairmont. 3 day
Thursday,
The Most Elaborate
That will visit you
THE BEST
An Entertainment for the L.
GRAND FREE S
4 ..a~ - \
EVERY DAY
Positively Two Performanc
ADMISSION?Adults
Y U U JK. m x r
S^\TVVV\.XX'VVXV*iXVVVVV\X^NX,CVVV<^C\>CVX>^X!S
wwSg C j|^8j?Sk |?||l<s tsPlily^ i^
Tlie Kind Yon Have Always B
in use for over 30 years, 1
_/? and Jit
All Counterfeits, Imitations t
Experiments tliat trifle with
Infants and" Children?Bxpet
What is Ci
Castoria is a harmless subsi
goric, Drops aii<l Soothing f
contrJns neitlier Opium, Mo
substance. Its age is its giia
and allays Feverislmess. It
Colic. It relieves Teetliing 0
and Flatulency. It assimila
Stomach and Bowels, giving
The Children's Fanacea?Tin
GENUINE CAST
The Kind You Hai
In Use For Oy
THC CGNT*U R COMPANY, 77 MO
bwbbbbmbbb?i
|! ' 317 Fourtl
?3 By our System of
S that is, making deposits and withdrawal
EE saving than banking in person. A littl
== your request. Our capital and resourc<
= Our advice, embodying the successful b
== is at your command.
5 Assets over*
s| c=. i?.
JlGHflEL
HORSE.
>n, of Fairmont, had
URED by the
mnify Company,
ay of the same month his
he received payment in
t the Stockmen,
uld be glad to
your ^ive stock againsi
loss by death from accidental
or natural
causes.
d Michael,
VISXlRAKMCE.
Fairmont, West Va
SOON!
and Frazee's
NED
is, commencing
, May 12.
Tented. Exhibition
r city this season.
sT IN AMERICA
ADIES AND CHILDREN.
TREET PARADE
AT NOON.
;es Daily?Rain or Shine.
; 25c, Children ISc.
3 ON THE DATE.
:miglit, and tvbicli lias been
las borne tlie sig-natnre of
is been made under Ills per
lupcrvision since its infancy,
ttb one to deceive you tins,
liili*'Jast-as-good'' arc bat:
and endanger tlio iiealtli of?
fence against Experiment.
ASTORIA
fcitute for Castor Oil, PareSyrups.
It is Fleasant. It
>rpliine nor otiier Narcotic
irantec. It destroys Worms
cures Diarrlioea and Wind.
Lroubles, cures Constipation
fces the Food, regulates tlie
liealtliy and natural sleep.
q Mother's Friend. *
OR IA ALWAYS
re Always Bought
/er 30 Years.
RBAV 6TRCCT. NCW YORK CITY.
1777777777777777777777777/77/77/////////////Zg,
i Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. g
Banking by Mail ?
Is, is just as easy and far more time ==
le booklet telling why, awaits EE
es speak for themselves. EE
usiness experience of years, =
$21,000,000 |
: I
I MONUMENT - i
I : v TO LINCOLN!
I
I A FUND OF S1CO.COO WAS RAISED i
; FORTY YEARS AGO AND THE j
DESIGN WAS ACCEPTED.
; THE PROJECT MYSTERIOUSLY i
DROPPED OUT OF SIGHT.
WAS TO HAVE BEEN IN
FRONT OF THE
CAPITOL.
i
Washington, d. c., May 4.?
! Records unearthed in the office of tli <
| treasurer of the Unite 1 States, show
( | that a fund of $100,000 was raised
ahout forty years ago to erect a monS
umeut to Lincoln. The money was
raised by popular subscription, the
t design for the monument was ao
. copied and the project mysterious^j
dropped out, of sight. "What became
of the $100,000 is not known. Jlost of
the officers of the association formed
to carry on the work have long sine;
died, and those now living profess to
have forgotten the very existence of
the scheme. A package of bla-k
"certificates" of the national Llncol.t
monument, which represent one do:"
iar contributions, and a copy of a
r monthly journal of the organization,
are about all the documentary remains
of the project that can now be
Tountj. vjfciier.ii opiuuei, ?uu ..aa
that time treasurer of the United
i States, was treasurer of the mcuu'
ment association, and among the men
to whom the work was intrusted by
the Congressional act were Alexander
P. Randall. James Harlan, Ale t inder
Ramsey, Nathaniel P. Banks. .Ir.coti
Benton, Shelby M. Cullom, John .
Benjamin, Horace Maynard and Rv>fits
Mailorv.
The monument, as planned, was tc
have been erected in front of the capitol,
and was to have been of granite,
seventy feet in height, triangular in
siiape, and surmounted by a heroic
figure of the martyred President.
CALL FOR REPUBLICAN DISTRICT
1 CONVENTIONS.
To the Republican voters of Marion
county:
< Conventions of the Republican par
ry of tbe several magisterial districts
jf Marion county are hereby called
;o meet on Saturday, the 4th day ot
June, 11)04, at 2 o'clock P. M., for the
purpose of electing delegates to the
following named conventions:
To tbe State nominating convention.
" to he held in Wheeling on the 12rh
day cl July, 1904.
To the Judicial convention to be
held in Morgan town on the Silt dav
L-i June, 1904, at 10 o'clock A. M.
To the Senatorial convention to be
hereafter called.
Also to-transact such other business
as may properly- conie before said
district conventions.
The said several district conventions
will be held at the respective
places hereinafter named; and will
elect the number of delegates herein
after designated, and no more, that
is to say:
Fairmont district convention will
meet at the Court-house in the City
of Fairmont, and is entitled to elect
the following number of delegates:
To the State convention, 6.
To the Judicial convention, 9.
To the Senatorial convention, 9.
Grant district convention will meet
in Monongah (meeting place to lie
provided by district committeeman!.
State convention, 2.
Judicial convention, 5.
Senatorial convention, 5.
Lincoln district convention will
meet at Farmington school house:
State convention, 3.
Judicial convention, 5.
Senatorial convention, 5.
Mannington district will meet at
Town of Mannington at school house.
State convention, 3.
.Judicial convention, n.
Senatorial convcmion, 11.
Pawpaw district will meet at Neil
tune school house.
State convention, 2.
Judicial convention, Li.
Senatorial convention. 3.
Union district will meet in the
First ward of the City of Fairmont,
at the school house.
State convention, 1.
Judicial convention. G.
Senatorial convention, 0.
Winfield district convention will
: meet in Mt. Harmony school house.
State convention, 2.
Judicial convention, 5.
Senatorial convention, 5.
It is requested that in making selection
of delegates, that only those
be selected who are likely to attend
the convention to which they arc
made delegates. The call for the
State convention states that no proxies
will be admitted as delegates.
By order of the Executive Committee.
HARRY SHAW, Chairman.
A. U. LEHMAN", Secretary.
Daiod April "du, iy01Cntiib
e r t Osborn, of C1 arlc?b\ire, is .
her a.
Work. Is-progressing rapiciiy cn the
river pier of the county, bridge.
MAKING CLAY PIPES.
A BUSINESS ABOUT WHICH MOST
PEOPLE KNOW VERY LITTLE.
the Process of Mannfactnrc 2* Not
So Simple Xislu Ke' Imn^iitcd
From the Low Price of the FinlHlicd
Product?Hoav They Are Mode.
Anionic the little things seen in daily
life about wliich most i>eople knowvery
little is the common, ordinary
clay pipe. In almost every eig;ar shop
window, in the mouth of every third
laborer met and even in the nursery
this snow white little instrument of
counorv ;iuu umuscuitin. ,? uv. o?.w*.
yet few know, for instance, that most
of the clay pipes sold in this city of
domestic make are manufactured in
New Jersey. Wood bridge is the name
of the queer little town given over to
this odd manufacture, anil a trip
through one of the factories of that
settlement, to follow the pipe from the
time it is dug as clay to the time it
appears ready for the market, is interesting.
Looking at the chunks and lumps of
clay as they are transported from the
banks to the factories, one would
hardly believe that the snowy, cheap
little article could have been manufactured
from material so different In
color. The color of tlds clay before It
is burned is dark gray, like cement;
nor Is the process of manufacturing
one of these pipes as simple as might
be imagined from the absurdly low
price. As the clay comes into the.factory
it is divided, finely ami put to
soak In water for ten (o twelve hours.
Tills soaking is to divide the clay to
its smallest possible particles so that
In the ensuing process It will not cake
or lump and will work smoothly and
*wu;Jy. This attained; the clay is put
into a "pug** mill, where it is stirred
by machinery until it gets stlffer and
stltTor. finally becoming as stiff as
lough. In this state the clay Is roughly
molded into lumps and distributed
anv ng the pipemaUcrs, who begin the
first stop In the life of the humble Croat!
-n.
? h-a.suing a small chunk of clay In
ch hand, the artist begins work to
fashion roughly two pipes at the same
hue. Ilollir.g the clay between a table
ml 11Is palms, he quickly produces
\v j carrot shaped and pointed rolls
hut boar little or no resemblance to
v\-i.on fr shall bo finished.
\":th ineroillble speed tho f.:shioiiinjr
lir^o rolls continues. for :;hon<l of
:l.e enpert is tl.o problem of :nnnv:f;\esomothin;.:
like seventy-five
ss of pipes within the wi-nlc. Then
rt.ll* r.ro jric -,v:i.v t;> dry
end .for ton < r twelve ho* :rs they
-i'.f. n. s*> <>v.*. t* sk.'.ped. they will
:t ; :* ii Illy to piece Af'.ei' thai
'.? rl :y ;: > n- for ;:i V: 11: i
The (; * "*!::rry ;.:.:T11 consists of t \v?
of i ;:: 1.1 ii </ rl.. . id'- :?;??!
n sewing 1.'>? :. Alost of-he
IJ *.!.o nv- s vo run:: " ::is -..is
":*> :o the ecntmon. r.r.ndorno.1 swt th :1
: in. I'.vo plee- : : I -r -n Vd
' orliri ; I in pi* sorr.
< " : * ; V- i.e. ..<? of !> )
r.?.I I mended t:> f.nddon : * .; in
Pd'oii of models t k.yyrn
:o bo in roun . The ; re-- I: r
one of the sh;'i oionn rolls. this the fj:
MJil np*,vn.rd. which ;:t once ^ivos the
-n:*?y-siion of :i J>."*)<'. n:i.I rr::s ? wire
*hrow*h the pointed end, or.t of which
Uio s.ein is t ? be pressed.
This roughly fmshlonod cl.ty Is then
put Into tho mold, which Is jemmed
-T...* *- ?-ii? MI.'W. timo M nlomrer
is pressed to enter tlie mold and to
press ont the clny so ns to for in the
bowl. With n dull knife the elnv
pressed out at the side of the mold is
shaved off with a single lightning
stroke by the expert, and then once
inoi*e there must be a drying process,
this time In a room hcated to about So
degrees. where, as before. the pipe is
kept for twelve hours. Except that the
pipe Is of its original gray color and
soft and supplied with the burs"
where the molded ends nre Joined, it is
now practically finished.
Then comes the process of shaving
off the burs. At this stage the pipe
still retains considerable dampness, so
that the clay may be cut smoothly.
While at tl>e same time a wire Is again
drawn through the stem, so as to Insure
proper draft.. All Is now ready
for the pipe in its final state except
that it needs to be burned. For this
purpose It Is put into a cylindrical vessel
twelve Inches high and as much In
diameter. This is known as a "sagger/*
Set one against the other, the
pipes are adjusted solidly in the sagger.
which will hold something like n
gross of pipes properly packed. If
the pipes consist of the more fancy designs?that
is, merely pipe bowls that
are to bo provided with mouthpieces
of wood or rubber?the saggers will
i?i.i ?.<. fflvi in-nvc f\f nlrw??
UKilU. il? Jlianj ?i.o n?v t--t
Nino of these saggers filled witli pipes
i re kno^'n as a stand, and a medium
clzcd Itiln will bold twenty-one stands
and will burn tbem all at the same
time. For five hours the beat in the
kiln is kept at a moderate temperature.
After that it is allowed to run
up until at the end of twelve or fourteen
hours it is driven to a white heat,
which gives the pipes their spotless
white finish.?New York Times.
Tlic I'ariH.
Every farmer should own his farm.
If he cannot own a largo one, let him
own what he can and gradually increase
the size. Land ownership conduces
to happiness, contentment and
restfulness. One of the greatest hindrances
io the prosperity''of the tenant
is that he is compelled to move frequently
and therefore cannot accumulate.?Maxwell's
Talisman.
lie wiser than other people if you
can. hut tie not tell them so.-r-Ckeste Cedd.
dead the West ; Virglaiah. It has
the "latest news.
life
^-vv
GOLDEN JUBILEE
CELEBRATION OF THE CONSECRATION
OF THE RT. REV.
RICHARD PHELAN, OPENED
AT PITTSBURG AT
THE CHURCH OFTHE
EPIPHANY.
I . |
.
PITTSBURG. Pa.. May 5.?With
solemn pomp and dignity, there opened
yesterday morning at the Church
of the Epiphany, one of the most notable
events in the history of the
Pittsburg Diocese of the Roman Catholic
Church. With the celebrating of
j Pontifical High. Mass a! It) o'clock
i with Archbishop P. J> Ryan, of Philadelphia.
celebrant, began the Golden
Jubilee celebration of the consecration
of the Rt. Rev. Richard Phelan
to the priesthood.
Surrounded by church dignitaries,
including Cardinal Gibbons, head of
the Roman Catholic Church in America.
the venerable jubilarian was the
recipient of an honor that has fallen
to the lot of few others in the United
States. The Right Rev. Michael John
Hogan, Bishop of Scranton. preached
rhe sermon, taking for his text the
words: (1 Tim. 5:17) "Let the
priests that, rule well be Esteemed
worthy of double honor; especially
they who labor in the word and doctrine."
He delivered an eloquent sermon,
and in concluding, spoke of Bishop
Phelan in highest enconimn.
During the banquet in the afternoon.
Bishop Phelan was presented
with tokens of esteem and love by
the clergy and laity of the dioceses.
Following the banquet Bishop Phelan
received his intimate friends in private
in the Hotel Schenley. In the
'evening at Carnegie Music Hall a
public reception to the jubilarian and
visiting prelates took place.
PAUL MORE
rrTc ni/ATinM
ucio uvaiiuii
"THE MUMMY AND THE HUMMING
BIRD" MAKES A BIG HIT
AT THE COURT THEATRE.
Paul Gilmore scored a great hit Saturday
night at the Co ;rt Theatre in
the clever play "The Mummy and the
Humming Bird." by Isaac 1'enderson,
an English journalist. -Mr. Gilmore
gave a superb interpretation of the
j leading role, hord Luruley, the "Mummy,"
and he played the part most
intelligently and artistically. He was
strong and masterly in the climacteric
scenes and demonstrated his
right to rank among th^> most talented
young actors on the American
stage. At the end of the tilled act he
received an ovation in the way of
three curtain calls, and finally responded
to demands for a speech. He
made a graceful effort, thanking the
audience for their stimulating applause
and declaring it was the finest
incentive for an actor to do his best
work.
Mr. Gilmore has splendid support.
John Martin as "Guiseppe," the Silician
organ grinder, was most natural
and effective and came in for hi en
praise with the star. Mr. Souths: d
as "Count D'Orelli," the "Humming
Bird," acquitted himself '.villi great
credit in the difficult role and showed
that he was a finished artist. Miss
Drew as "Lady L?umley" was very
satisfactory, and the rest of the company
was well up to the mark. The
costuming and scenery were fine.?
Wheeling Telegraph, May *M.
SOM E APPLE Hi STORY.
IVlany Western Orchards Started By
"Apple-Seed Johnny."
The first apple trees planted in
America were imported by the Dutch
settlement at New York in 1G14. Apple
trees were also known to have
been growing at Jamestown, Va., as
early as 1622. Until within the last
half century apples were grown almost
solely for cider making, as is the
case to-day in France. As hard cider
will produce cl run ken n ess and a horrible
kat/.enjammer, William Penn advised
his colonists in Pennsylvania
ro cultivate indigenous fruits alone, |
as apples were then used almost exclusively
for making cider or apple j
jack.
Many of the orchards of the pioneers
of the Middle West were
grown from s'eeds obtained in a peculiar
way. Some man whose full
name has boon forgotten, and who is
remembered only by the appellation
of "Apple-Seed Johnny," t ?aveled
through the West and scattered
hearty welcome at every cabin door.
The last decade or two has shown
wonderful development of the large
commercial apple orchards in the
West, and the industry has now assumed
vast proportions. Apples, for
instance, are exported to England and
many foreign countries. Apple cores
froni the big drying: establishments
are purchased by Eastern buyers and
shipped to France to be used in the
adulteration of wines and champagne.
A large cart of this champagne and
wine is snipped hajfk to America in.
'wine casks made" a;|Poplar Bluff; Mo.,
in the largest bar. Ad factory' m the
"jifWV ? I
COMMITTEE ON
ARRANGEMENTS
OF THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL
COMMITTEE RECOMMEND
HON. ELIH U ROOT AS
TEMPORARY CHAIRMAN
OF CHICAGO CONVENTION.
Washington, d. c\. Mays.?The |jj
committee on arrangements of the
Republican National Committee yesterday
afternoon decided to recom- J
mend unofllcially to the full committee '
tlie temporary chairman of the convention.
Hon. iClihu Root, former Sec- - 5
rotary of War. after determining that
the subcommittee had not the author- ,'j
ity officially to elect the temporary
chairman. Charles \V. Johnson, of ?
Minnesota, was selected for Secretary
of the convention, and John R. , i
Malloy. of Ohio, assistant secretary
Other officers were selected as follows
.
Assistant .Secretaries?James O.
Cannon, of New York: Lucien Gray,
of Illinois: Wlliet M. Spooner, of
Wisconsin: I.. Larry Eyre, of Pennsylvania;
Rome C. Stephens, of Indiana:
John H. King, of South Dakota,
and Walter S. Melicu, of California.
Reading Clerks?W. H. Harrison, of :tl
Nebraska: Dennis E. Alward, of ;
Michigan: E. L. Wemple. of Ohio; I.
T. W. R. Duckwall, of West Virginia; Wrli
and Jas. H. Stone, of Michigan.
Clerk at President's Dealt?Asher
C. Hinds, "of Maine.
Official Reporter?Milton \V. Bin- ''
men berg, of Illinois.
Tally Clerks?Fred B. Whitney, of
Illinois, and George R. Bntlin, of Nebraska.
Messenger to Chairman?Gurley
Brewer, of Indiana.
Scrgcant-at-Arms?Wm. F. Stone, of
Maryland.
First Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms?
David C. Owens, of ..isconsln. -1
Cnief Doorkeeper?Charles S. Montall,
Maryland.
It was decided to call a meeting of
the whole committee for Wednesday. *
June 1"). at two P. M.. at the Colise'.-m
in c nicago, for the purpove of hearing
contests, and to make hp the temporary
roll of the convention. Chairman
Payne, who attended to-day's
meeting, unofficially will Issue the
Secretary Dover, of the National
OimmiU.ee, ami Sergeant at-ArruSI
one. were authorized to open, head(in,irters
at the Coliseum June 12.
A number of reports were read,
among them one from the Central
Traliic Association, that *hey will
make a rate of one faro for the round At
rip, good from the JtitU to the 20th
going, and until the 20th leaving, and
the western anil eastern traffic associations
will make a like >ate.
statemedF
CAL ASSOCIATION
WILL. BE THE GUEST OF THE
MARION COUNTY MEDICAL
SOCIETY HERE NEXT WEEK
?MEETINGS WILL BEGIN
TUESDAY.
A FEATURE OF THE MEETINGS
WILL BE AN ADDRESS ON "SUI
CIDE" TO BE GIVEN AT THE
NORMAL AUDITORIUM ON
WEDNESDAY EVENING.
As guests of the Marion County
Medical Society, the West Virginia
State Medical Association will hold
the thirty-seventh annual meeting in
this city on Tuesday. Wednesday and
Thursday. May 10th, 11th and 12th.
The meetings will be held in W. C.
T. U. Hall, beginning on Tuesday at
two p. m.
The officers of the Association are
Dr. T. L. Barber, Charleston, President;
Dr. VV. W. Golden, Elkins, Secretary;
Dr. V. T. Churchman, Charleston,
Treasurer.
A feature of these meetings is the
public address given by some one of
the mem bets. The lecturer tht 3 year is
Dr. S. D. Jopson, of Wheeling, the
subject "Suicide," epidemics, rapid increase
in present day, effect of nationality.
of different religions, of Infidelity,
of marriage, of divorce, sui- ;.v;
eide in law, in life insurance. Is ciitt l*r
suicide insane? Is suicide necessarily
an evil? Causes predisposing and ex- - j
citing; the evils of our civilization;
how to diminish the tendency and
some remedies suggested. y ?-ycy
This lecture will be given in the
Normal Auditorium at 8 p. m. on
Wednesday evening, to which the publie
is invited. ',
WEST VIRGINIA LADY
HONORED BY D. OF R.
BOSTON, Mass., May 5.?Prominent
society women froin all over the Uni- . i
te<I States are attending the meeting
at the genera! society of the Datsgh- .'n.
tecs oi" the Revolution. To-cfay the , n
nominating committee reported the
name of Mrs. Margaret Lane, oi West
Virginia, for membership on the board
of trustees, and she was elected. The
treasurer general's report shoved
the largest "balance ja the trtnrury
aver reported. '

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