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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 10, 1904, Image 1

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YOLOIE I. ' - * FAIK31GXT. WEST VIRGINIA, TUESDAY. MAY 10. 1904. NUMBER la
SMALLPOX
AT SALEM
SCORES OF CASES NOW EXIST
AND MANY PEOPLE HAVE
BEEN EXPOSED.
CHURCHES WERE CLOSED SUN?-.*v
&Mr? -t-Mtr POSTOFFICE IS
CLOSELY GUARDED.
Tie STuall-pox situation at Salem is
oeeotning very serious, so much so
t" that strenuous and vigorous action
is being taken. The.surrounding c'om(
munities are becoming greatly alarmk
-ed and as a result business in Salem
tas been practically suspended, and
} the town is quieter than it has been
I for years. Within the corporate limI.-.
its there is alsp much anxiety and uneasiness.
That there have been many
. exposures every one knows and no
one knows how soon lie may become
i" a victim of this loathsome disease.
, There have been in the neighborhood
of fifty cases and four or five
deaths. And at this time twenty cases
v are reported", but all are under quarantine
and every effort possible is be.
ing made to stamp out the disease.
The great danger, however, is that
- -It may spread to such an extent as Jo
[ get entirely beyond the control of lot
cal anthorities and the health boards.
| All the churches were closed Sat>
-TirvSav and Sunrlav. The nostoffice is
i heing closely guarded and not more
i than three persons are allowed in it
1: at any one time. All the barber shops
are also.guarded and not more than
> "two persons are allowed in them at
, "the same time. Business houses are
f:? -suffering and there is practicaly noth>
ing doing in any line on account of the
- situation.?Clarksburg Telegram.
; ALONG THE
: BELT LINE
.Are many new industries
f springing up?the moun1
tain city stove and founi
dry company,
f rMDR.trvMT WAI I PLASTER
COMPANY AND THEAULTMAN
, PUMP WORKS ARE ALU GETTING
READY FOR
BUSINESS.
/
Several new industries will soon be
i In operation along the Bell Line.
"This is the manufacturing district of
our city, and is what holds it up. The
Monongali Glass Company's plant was
' spoken of in these columns a few days
i ago.
f The Mountain City Stove and Foundry
Company's plant will be quite an
; -addition to our industries, and before
I very long \vii!*?employ a number of
f people. The old boiler house 011 the
Belt Lino has been fitted up with ail
? the necessary equipment for the manufacture
of gas stoves, heaters, stove1'
pipe, etc.
The foundry building is new and
-complete in every detail. I-Iere all
the castings will be made, and addition??
buildings contain the engine,
press, fans, lathes and cleaners. The
-cnpola Is the most complete in litis
section. This company now owns all
the patterns formerly owned by the
Wiggintou and Sheets foundry, and
i has some of tlie best equipment for
' all kinds of castings in tliis part of the
State. W. Ed Means has charge of
this department.: and he is one of the
) most practical moulders and fouitdryjaen
in the country. This new indusi
try starts out under favorable condi"
tions and will likely grow to be one of
the leading industries in the city.
The Fairmont Wall Plaster Company
is extending its business to include
the manufacture of cement, hollow
brick and building stone. The
machinery and material are on hand
' and the new department will be in
operation as soon as the buildings are
completed, which will be in a couple
of weeks. This morning we were
' shown some samples of the work they
! will do, and in some respects they
were the finest of the kind we have"
seen. Their machines are arranged
.so that the blocks of -stone can be
"
ADAMS EX=
PRESS TRAIN
WAS WRECKED THIS MORNING
ON THE NEW YORK. NEW HAVEN
AND HARTFORD LINE
?TWO MEN WERE
KILLED
AND SEVERAL .INJURED?TRAIN
HAD BEEN SUBJECT OF RUMORS
CONCERNING ROBBERS
AS IT CARRIED
$500,OCO IN BULLION.
POETCHESTER, N. Y., May 10.?
Two men were killed and several others
were injured in the wreck of the
Adams Express train on New York,
New Haven and Hartford at 1:05 this
morning. The dead are Patrick Keenart,
Engineer of Boston; John Howe,
Fireman of Boston.
Several members of the train crew
were hurt hut not seriously.
The train was composed of sixty
express cars with through express
matters for Philadelphia, Baltimore
and Washington. ft left Boston at
G: 30 last night and carried bullion and
other property, aggregating $500,000
in value. This is the train about
which there have been vague rumors
that robbers were planning to wreck
and loot. The wreck of this morning,
however, seems to have been purely
accidental.
It is thought that the engineer tried
to-make a cross over switch at too
ynonri The result was that
tjie engine and two cars went over, a
fifty foot embankment into the By rum
river. Traffic was not seriously delayed
by the accident.
POTS
NEWS STORE CHANGES HANDS?
ARTHUR G. MARTIN BECOMES
THE OWNER AND WILL
CONSOLIDATE HIS
TWO STORES.
A. deal was consummated last evening
whereby Arthur G. Martin .takes
possession of John H. Hough's .Main
street business.
| The store owned by Mr. Martin and
| the one recently acquired will be consolidated
in the room formerly occupied
by J. L. Hall, in the Hall block.
This change of quarters will occur
about June 1st. and in the meantime
Clarence Musgrave and Caroline
Bright will conduct the Hough stand.
Mr. Hough has not yet decided what
business ne win emei.
Mrs. Nancy IV.. Deck Dead.
Mrs. Nancy 1ST. Deck, one of the
city's oldest residents, died at the
home of hov (laughter, Mrs. Henry Hagar,
on Ch-sintit street, Hamilton's
Hill, at an early hour this morning after
?i lingering illness of a complication
of diseases. Mrs. Deck was
we I known to tlie older residents
litre. Her funeral will be held at her
daughter's residence to-morrow after|
noon at 2 o'clock and her remains wiii
I be interred in the Fairmont cemetery,
j She was r?S years of age. Her husband
died nearly forty years ago.
Mrs. Deck leaves but one child, Mrs.
Henry Hagar, with whom she made
her home.
faced with any color or composition
desired without much increase in the
cost. To give an example, they can
take common sand and make the block
with a white face resembling marble.
Tiiic; will be a arreat addition to our
industries, and will double the force
of men employed by this firm.
The "Aultman Pump Works is another
industry that will open soon. Its
chief object is the manufacture of
pumping apparatus. T. J. Aultman,
one of the best machinists in this
part of the country, will be in charge
of these works. Fairmont is fortunate
in having Mr. Aultman here, as he. can
i repair any part of our city pump
works, which has heretofore been
sent away to he repaired, at a heavy
cost. has already been doing
some repair work in tne city. This
factory will begin operation in a few
weeks.
.With these new Industries Fairmont
will continue in its' prosperity, notwithstanding
that It has been said that
l the Fairmont region is dead.
;||o
NOTED AFRICAN EXPI
THE WHOLE WORLD KNOWS OF Th
STONE AND BROUGHT EMIN
TILE COUNTRY THROUGH
WE CONGO TO CIV
HE WAS REARED IN A POOR HOUS
BOY, BUT STEP BY STEP HE
CAME ONE OF THE M OSANY
LAN
HE WAS BORN IN WALES. BUT ADC
AND SERVED IN THE CON FE
ED HIGH HONORS IN ENG
FAVORITE OF QU
LONDON, May 10.?Sir Henry M. nj
Stanley, the noted African explorer, -:i
died this morning. He had been physically
weak for some months when j
he caught a chill a fortnight ago, gi
which resulted in a,severe attack of M
pleurisy with complications. mi
Sir Henry Morton Stanley, G. C. B., ta
C. L., and L. L. D., the man who found a
Livingstone, who led the exploration Rc
which relieved Emin Pasha and In
brought him out of a hostile country pli
through the forests of the Congo to gr
civilization, was' a Welshman by birth. Cf
His name was originally John Pow- mi
lands. He was reared in a poor house. 011
near St. Asaph, began life as a cabin ce
boy and got to New Orleans, where lb
he was adopted by a merchant, whose he
name he took. - th
He served in the Confederate army, St
"* -- o.1 Tirnn- no
ana as ensiB" i-?ii mu ?
derago. After the war he wont as a w*
newspaper correspondent to Turlvey.v ha
In 1S6S he did his* first important ca
piece of newspaper work, going to Sc
Abyssinia with rhe British expedition Ec
as correspondent of the Herald. In an
1SG9 James Gordon Bennett, started ta
him off for Africa to find Dr. David w<
Livingstone, the explorer and mis- tit
sionary, of whom nothing had been E;
heard for two years. He readied th
Zanzibar in January, ISTi, organized Si
his search expedition and started for no
the inland march, with 192 native fol- frc
lowers. He found Livingstone at an
Ujiji, on the shore of Bake Tango- j w:
wnw f=. M. S HC
Whose Eloquent Address Before the V . IV!
on Page 2 of TF
FREE I
Nc
ON LAND SIDE AGAIN IS PORT pQ
ARTHUR?JAPANESE HAVE a?,
BEEN REPULSED.
ST. PETERSBURG, May 10.?A dispatch
receivecT to-day reports that
Port Arthur is again free-on the land lot
side. The Japanese, says the dispatch, an
have been repulsed in an encounter ah
twenty kilometres' from the railway, lol
k Mlfii
.ORER DIED TO DAY"
? i
HE MAN WHO FOUND LIVINGPASHA
OUT OF A HOSTHE
FORESTS OF
MLIZATION.
F
IE, BEGAN LIFE AS A CABIN
ROSE UNTIL HE BEr
FAMOUS MEN OF
D.
C
3]
>PTED AMERICA AS HIS HOME. 0
DERATE ARMY?RECIEVLAND,
AND "WAS A
EEN .VICTORIA.
fe
(T
'ika in the following November, w
rnislied him with supplies, explored
e .Lake with him, and then left him |r
st as Livingstone started out in the ,T|
st expedition in which he died, p,
anley got back* to England in n]
arch, 1872, and found himself fa- gj
diis. The British Association enter- ^
ined him, Queen Victoria sent, him ,1(
gold and diamond snuff box and the Jr
>yal Geographical Society dined him. s,
1875 he was sent to Africa and exored
hake Victoria Nyanza after
eat hardships. He descended the
>rtgo in a memorable trip of eight
Dnths and got back to civilization
a Portuguese man of war. He reived
the cross , of the Legion of k
)nor after that, then, in succession |
explored the Congo, and founded
e present Congo Free State there,
anley Pool on the -upper Congo is
.med for him. His last great work
is the relief of Em in Pasha, who
d been left behind in Central Afri
the Mahdi swept over the |
iirlati wiping out the outposts of ^
;yptian civilization. He found Em in
a
cl brought him home. Several noble
books of travel and exploration
* . * - 11
jre written ny linn. After his ret
i i
rn in triumph from the rescue of
12in Pasha, he married .Miss Doro- j
h
y Tennant, the eldest daughter of .
h1
r George Tennant, and an artist of .
te. He was elected to Parliament
>rn the Lambeth. division of London.
n
d took a prominent part there. He J.
is 03 years of age. . '
* i
SS|BBjBp^r h
Is
JWALTER, t]
d
I. C. A. on Sunday. Will Be Founa -^
lis Issue.
w
Left For Martinsburg.
Constable L. C. Jones left to-day for
artinsburg, where he will appear bere
the Federal grand jury against c.
jab Sloane for breaking into the e
stofHce at Watson, and perhaps it
alnst some other violaters around
re.
: a
Improving Lot.
Walton. Miller is having his vacant
: at the corner of Fairmont avenue t<
d Seventh street- graded. He will
30 vu.L down a walk In front of -the ft
" I / ' ?
V i
4 NICE
BUSINESS
OR OUR LOCAL WHOLESALE
HARDWARE COMPANY?LARGE
SHIPMENT RECENTLY MADE
TO VERA CRUZ. MEXICO.
The JacobsHutchinson Hardware
ompany recently made their first j
alpiuent that went boyond the bounds
f the United States. The order consted
of over It).000 pounds of barbi
wire. steepie3. etc., and was sent
> Vera Cruz. Mexico.
This lirm also landed an order a
w days ago, that will aggregate
zer $1,500 for builders' hardware that
ill go to Pennsylvania.
Both of these orders were received
y them in competition with the big3st
jobbers in the country. This
roves very conclusively to retail
erchants that there is no reason for
ring out of the State to buy their
ardware. This firm lias men who go
rt only to most of the principal towns
i the State, lint reach out into the
trrounding States for business.
EXPLOSION
ILLED TWO MEN IN A POWDER
VI ILL?THE MEN WERE CLEANING
UP THE MILL PREPARATORY
TO A SHUT DOWN.
i
TpOY. X. V., May 10.?An exploon
occurred about o'clock thin,
ior:i liitr in the SchaglVticoke Powder
[ill. Two men we're killed: Joseph
-nii^ tit^ nvzifitH rt t siiDerintensleiil
ti.7 Chauncey Crandall. on employe.
The met weic engaged in cleaning
p tlio mill preparatory to a shut
own. Crandall was in the mill when
10 explosion occurred. He was ,
urlod some forty or fifty feet and his
ody badly lacerated- All his clothlg
was ripped from his body.
Assistant Superintendent V.'atts was
assinpr by and was struck by a flying
nsber. vTLere were two explosions,
he first one took place In tlie canning ,
iill. It; is not exactly known what
ante.1 it. The press room where
hi powder is pressed into cakes, was
ir?e fifteen leer distant and exploded
)o;i after it. The mill is the propria
or the Onnoiit Powder Company,
aving been t hsorbed in the powder (
orojiiie. It previously belonged to
Vi JVifian Rand Co.Tlorh
of the* victims of the exploion
lesided In Valley Falls.
Mr. Wads' liome was in Pittsburg, ,
a., hut he had been a resident of
alloy Falls ever since his connection .
"itli the in 11. ?
iiiT/Tii fi f?\TAr\rni v I
nuun n. snuuciiLi
/ILL COME TO FAIRMONT WITH i
HIS BRIDE TO-MORROW.
Hugh K. Snoderly, now of Balti
ion;*, was married in Cincinnati Sunay,
to Miss Kate Shick. They are
ow r?xi their way here, and will ar- '
ive on Xo. 5 in the morning. Mr.
noderly is a brother of Mrs. W. If.
lillingslea, and is well known here,
aving been with the Fairmont Coal
ompany a number of years. Not long
go he was transferred to the Baltiicre
office of the company, where he 1
olds a responsible position. His :
ride. Miss Shick, is an accomplished
idy and a general favorite among 1
he people who know her. Mr. and
Irs. Snoderlv will remain here a few 1
ays and then leave for their home. 1
i Baltimore. They will be the guests '
f Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Billingslea ]
'hile in Fairmont. ^
Postponed.
The board bill case which was to '
arae up in Judge Amos* court last
vening was postponed until this even
?-*? * ?1 U ?.sii
ig ac wuc-u n. w ii.ji
Dr. I>. C. Coplin, of Boothsville, is 1
visitor to our -city to-day.
i
Dr. F. B. Murphy, of Philippi, is atindlng
the Medical. Association.
L. S. Hornor, of Claifcsburg, was in 1
te city to-day on bi^lrfess.
JUMPED TO
HIS DEATH
' -A
FROM NO. 55 LAST NIGHT AT BARRACKVILLE,
DID YOUNG IRA
KINNAN, OF ICE'S RUN.
WAS BROUGHT TO THIS CITY AND
IS NOW AT TMt JUNta uraucrtTAKIfG
ESTABLISHMENT.
Ira who lived oil Ice's run,
died at tie .Miner's Hospital this
n'c l-ing a. seven o'clock, from Injuries
i ccevie.i while alighting from a
moving train nt Barrackyllle last .
evening. He was on 55 which does
no' stop at Darrackville. and he attempted
to get. off while the train
wus running al full speed. He was
thrown several feet and was picked
up unconscious. He was brought to
this city on No. 4 and was hurried
to the Miners' Hospital, but It was
found that ho had received internal -.
inj u-'cs an 1 he died this morning at
the hour named.
He was removed to the. .Tones undertaking
rooms and will be taken to ^
his lather's home on Ice's run this
evening. He was IS years old.
FAIRBANKS
HAS CALL
OH THE VICE-PRESIDENCY, SO IT
IS CLAIMED?HE IS REPORTED
AS BEING WILLING TO
HAVE THE HONOR.
SENATOR LODGE IS OBJECTIONABLE
TO SENATORS SPOONER
AND ALLISON.
? 'iB
WASHINGTON, D. ,C.. May . 1(1.?|n v ;
administration . circles..the Jjellcf, iias
become a get tied, cgliyiction,.thatvSen- ator
Fairbanks, of Indiana, will be .
named for the Vieo-Presidjen<;y:nn. the .
ticket with President Roosevelt it is
understood that the Senator lias in-,
formed him that he desires the honor
of running with lilnv .
There is no such unanimity of expression
with regard to the question
as to who is to lie the National campaign
chairman. Members of the ad- ,
-1 . .nn nro m?ifh in rloilht.' AH
t his poiiu as any of the rank and file ,
of the party.'
Senator Penrose is recognized as
possessing many qualities for the
place, but it would be a mistake to assurne
that he will be chosen. The suggestion
tuat he would he particularly :
available because he would have the
ad vice and assistance of Senator Quay ;
has unfortunately' becoiiiq futile. Senator
Quay is permanently relieved
from politics because of his sickness,
and it is believed that his valuable
experience will not be made use of : :
in the coming campaign. ' \
In other names most frequently
mentioned for the National chairmanship
is that of Franklin Murphy, of
New Jersey, and it is thought that the
choice will finally lie between him and
Senator Penrose. ,
The idea advanced that Senator
Lodge might be given the place is entirely
without foundation. . -'iSs
Hints iiave already reached the
President of the danger of, having vifi
Lodge connected with his administration.
Jealousies have arisen over the . |
selection of the Massachusetts Senator
to be chairman of the Committee As
on Resolutions at the Republican con- f '
vention. These have gone so far that
the President has been notified that
both Senator Spooner and Senator AX- mam
lison will refuse to serve on that committee
with Lodge.
However much the President migh.t
like to see his friend in charge of the campaign,
it is therefore out OH the
luestion.
The Weather.
WASHINGTON, "May 10.?For West
U'irs'inJft.t T^air to-nierlit and Wednes
Say. For "Western Pennsylvania:
Rain to-night; colder In Northern portion;
"Wednesday, fair; fresh northwesterly
winds. For Ohio: . Fair tonight,
except . rain and colder along
the northeast lake shore. Wednesdayfair
with -warmer in western portion;
westerly winds, becoming variable.

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