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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 11, 1904, Image 1

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VOLUME I. ^ FAIRMONT^ WEST VIKGIXIA, WEM^BAY. MAY JJU lnm. ^ " >sUIMBER 20.
SENATOR
SCOTT
SEES- NOTHING BUT REPUBLICAN
SUCCESS THIS YEAR AND
TALKS OF IT TO A WHEELING
TELEGRAPH REPORTER.
'CONTEST FOR STATE OFFICES
WI2-L AMOUNT TO NOTHING,
AND ALL WILL LINE UP FOR
THE TICKET.
i
Senator Nathan Bay Scott arrived
in Wheeling this morning direct Irorn
Washington anil will remain in the
city nntil the 12th of June, when he
.goes to Chicago to take charge of the
^preliminary work of the Republican
-National convention.
Senator Scon, is looking remarkably
well, and when seen by a representative
of tlie Telegraph at noon stated
"that he never felt better in mind or
body.
, Naturally a conversation with Sena'
tor Scott drifts into politics. He'
stakes a cheerful view of the situation:
:itt West Virginia and believes there
5s no occasion for pessimism because
-of the apparent friction between contending
factions.
"It is the natural outcome of a
:3trenuons campaign," remarked the
Senator, "and forebodes no disaster to
"the party. In truth, I am led to believe,
after reviewing numberless contests
like the one now being waged,
- that victory always follows. What is
rsaid and done in the heat of the campaign
Is soon forgotten and threats
that candidates will not receive the
, rsupport of the party amount to little.
-i am convinced iliac me .rfcepiidiio<a.u?
'vviil not permit factional fights to interfere
with party success.
"Then, too, the people are too prosperous
and happy to desire a change
>o? administration and you mark my
prediction that West Virginia will
give tne largest Republican plurality
:in its history."
Senator Scott is highly pleased with
reports from over the country at large
assuming Republican success at the
polls this fall.
He remarked that the business con tLitions
are favorable for the Republi cans,
also: and that what might bo
lost in one quarter win be more than
made up" in others by the opportunities
furnished all for employment at
-good wages.
He is pleased to get back and spend
:sometime with his old friends in
Wheeling.
ROBB
RESIGNED
.(ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL
HANDED IN HIS RESIGNATION
TO-DAY TO TAKE EFFECT
IMMEDIATELY.
WILL HEREAFTER BE IN THE DE-j
PARTMENT OF JUSTICE AND
WILL DEVOTE HIMSELF TO
POSTAL INVESTIGATION.
WASHINGTON, D. May 11.?
- Charles TI. Robb. of Vermont, assistant
attorney general for the Poslotfice
.Department, placed his resignation in
the hands of the Postmaster General
to-day to take effect immediately.
He goes to tne Department of Justice,
where his itnie will De devoted almost
entirely with reviewing reports
of inspectors engaged upon the Inves,
.ligation of certain brandies of the
JPostoiHce Department. This work.
Postmaster General rayne said to-day.
will require >.?ie greater part of a year.
i-io limner jiimuniiccs uiai. ti---- itpui L
-of the inspectors on the New York
postolfic.e has not yet been placed in
Iris hands, and that their report on
the Washington City postofflce lias not
been completed.
Charges of over-zeal on the part of
the inspectors are to he carefully investigated.
The names of fifty employes
of high and low degree, have
been recommended for dismissal.
While the papers were under consid?ration
friends of some of them carried
'heir cases to the President. It
was charged that the inspectors had
gone outside of their duty and had
been working more for a record than
that justice be done. It is understood
that Assistant Attorney General Robbvrfn
at once take up these reports and
go over them. His findings will form
the basis for action.
PLEASANT
MEETING
VISITING PHYSICIANS HAVING
FINE TIME AT WILLARD HALL.
AND ENJOYING THEMSELVES
ELSEWHERE
WHEN NOT IN SESSION?MANY
INTERESTING PAPERS WERE
READ TO-DAY?LECTURE ON
SUICIDE" COMES TONIGHT.
EVERYBODY WELCOME
The West Virginia Medical Association
is holding one of the best meetings
in its history. A large number
of physicians are present from all over
the State.
Last night the hospitals in the
city were thrown open to the visitors
and nearly all took advantage of the
opportunity. To-day the meeting continued
in Willard Hall, and papers
were read by Drs. Hupp and Aschman,
of Wheeling; Wade and Gardner,
of Morgantown; Louchery and Ogden.
of Clarksburg; Lind, of New Richmond;
Frame, of Parkersburg; and
Cook and McDonald, of Fairmont.
To-night Dr. Jepsou, of Wheeling,
will deliver an address on "Suicide"
at the Normal Auditorium. The
public is invited to attend.
The following physicians are registered,
and a number have not yet registered:
C. L. Holland, Fairmont; Thomas L.
Nutter,- Enterprise; J. A. Graham,
Fairmont; F. T. Haught, Mona; D.
P. Cntikshank, Montana; P. B. Ogden,
F. W. Hill and H. R. Johnson,
Fairmont; James A. Cox, Morgan?ownfv\V.
C. Cole, Hundred; M. E.
Gp-tdner, C. H. Maxwell and John N.
Simpson, Morgantown; W. H. Post,
Dcllsiow: R. IT. Edmtindson, Morgan
town; R. W. Hale, Moundsville; u.
H.- "Brownfield, W. C. Jamison, Hal
Hall and E. \V. Howard, of Fairmont;
C- T. Smith. Tunnelton; J. J Durrett,
Fairmont; Benj. F. Bowe. Tunneltcn;
W. N. Burnwell, Parkersburg; C. E. T.
Casto, Believille; V. A. Selby. Fairmont;
\>. E. Talbott, Howesville;
Chas. F. Amos, Gypsy; D. C. Loucherv,
Clarksburg; W. J. Cox, Uniontown;
L. S. Brock, Morgantown; W.
D. Roiv, Parkersburg; C. T. Arnett,
Rivesville; Jas. A. Riedy, Monongah;
C. Deniiani. Sutton; Bf A. Owen,
Greenville; D. C. Coplin, Boothsville:
L. D. Wilson, Wneeling; J. P. Alpine,
Evers'on; AX. J. Tansler, Rowlesburg;
W. D. Stewart, Moundsville; J. F.
Michael, Fellowsvilie; ?v". S. Michael,
Hendricks; J. S. Pyle, jjearsville; C.
0. Henry, Fairmont; S. I.lepson,
\v neeling; C. F. Boyer, Jr., and J. R.
Cook, Fairmont: Chas. A. Wingerter,
Wheeling; S. S. Wade, Morgantown;
H. B. Stoup, Parkersburg; O. O. Cowper,
Hinton; T. L. Barber, Charleston;
Wm. \V. Golden, Elkins; V. T.
Churchman. Charleston; G. A. Ascliman.
Wheeling; J. F. Reger, Littleton;
1. NT. Houston. Moundsville; I. J. Culp,
Farinington: S. J. Postere, Newburg;
I.. C. Oyster, Lumberport; ,T. H. Wetzel,
Ravenswood; E. T. Hall, Weston;
F. B. Murphy, Philippi; Allen Bush,
Alorganloxvn; A. B. Bush, Barlin; JI.
D. Cure, Vanclalia; Win. C. Abel, West
Union; J. \V. Chesney, Fairmont; J.
W. Abercrombie, Dallas; D. P. Fitcli,
Fairmont; T. AI. F.ooil, Clarksburg;
R. J. Reed. "Wheeling; O. F. Covert,
Aloundsville: A. C. Earnest. Littleton;
I, T. Pric-kett, Ravensv. ood: AI. F.
Wigbt. Burlington: D. F. Ireland,
Granlsvllle; A. A. Shawkey. Charleston;
J. A- Jamison, Fairmont; W. S.
Keener, Parkersburg; C. S. Hoffman,
Kevser: E. H. Parsons, Piedmont;
Jas. E. Cooper. Cameron: J. V. McDonald,
Fairmont, and .1. AI. McLaughlins,
Webster Springs.
The "Ranch King."
On next Friday night at the Grand
Opera House in this city, the "Ranch
King" will be presented by a company
of liigli-class artists for the benefit of
local aerie 55J. Fraternal Order o[
Eagles.
Jaclc Godwin and cnuoru >? awwi,
win) are members of the aerie in this
city, will be here to assist in putting
on the bill which will be a treat for
local theatregoers.
Fisher and Fleming will, of course
appear, and that alone should pack
the house.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. M. Jacobs will
leave in the morning for Indianapolis,
Ind., where they will spend about ten
days with relatives. They are thinking
of visiting St. Louis before they
return home.
iw,
BETHANY
COLLEGE
;5ETS 3I? GiFT OF ONE HUNDRED |
THOUSAND DOLLARS?ATTENDANCE
THIS YEAR HAS
BROKEN ALL RECORDS.
TRUSTEES MEET IN PITTSBURG
i AND SECURE VALUABLE ADDITION
TO FUNDS?GEO. T.
OLIVER GIVES S20.COC TO
THE INSTITUTION.
j PITTSBURG, May II.?The trustees
of Bethany College. Bethany, W.
Va.. met yesterday afternoon in the
rooms of the chamber of commerce
and made arrangements lor the commencement
exercises of that, institu- j
tion. ft n'as announced that the en* !
dowment fund of tne institution iias !
been increased to $50,000 during the J
past year, and that $50.000 more has j
been subscribed, making a total in* j
crease or $iuo,uuu. ueorge i. uav^,
who was graduated from the institution,
gave $20,000 of this amount.
The board of trustees decided to
hold their annual meeting June 14, 15
and 10. The attendance at the coj:
lege during the past year was reported
to nave broken all previous records,
and the graduating class will be a
large one. The commencement exercises
will take place at Bethany.
During the year a new dormitory
was built for the boys and already is j
rilled and applicants find it hard to gei. |
places. The Phillips home for girls is )
also full and more room 'is needed.
There was some talk of erecting several
additions to the college, and it is
likely some such action will be taken
in the n6ar future.
There are many Pitisburgers who
have been graduated from Bethany
and ine majority7 of them will attend
the commencement exercises this ,
year. The speakers have not yet been
named, nor the full list of graduates
made public.
I -Vy: - - '
EAST FAIRJV
The above illustration shows the
The grove itself will be made attracts
"The Pike/' Refreshments and lunch
will be preserved, and it is proposed to
resort. Beginning Saturday, May 14 tl
capacity 1,500, will leave Fairmont eve
mont Park. The round trip is 25 cen
floor on first cjsck. i wo oiner uc^ivo
rates can be secured fay lodges, chun
the "Beauty/' or by B. &. O. trains, v\
"NOMORE
MEN NEEDED TO BREAK THE
STRIKE IN COLORADO ACCORDING
TO A TELEGRAM.
Superintendent McAllister, of the
Colorado Iron and Fuel Company,
wired his man Rooney yesterday that
no more men would be needed, as
they now have a sufficiency with
which to break the strike. Rooney is
the adopted name of a foreigner who
has been In this region for some time
employing men to go to Colorado for
the purpose of breaking the strike.
Dr. D. C. Copeland, ol iooiasvnii;,
who is here attending the. meeting
of the Medical Association, lias been
a subscriber to the Weekly West Virginian
for many years. He flopped
in to-day and subscribed for the Daily.
New Summer Car.
The local street car company will
put on a new summer car. It arrived
to-day and will likely be ready for '
service by next Sunday. Its number
is 21..
ALL ABOUT
THE WAR
i
AND WHAT THEY KILLED EACH
OTHER FOE?SHORT SITS OF
NEWS FROM THE ORIENT.
RUSSIANS ARE BELiEVED TO
HAVE DESTROY EC THEIR
FLEET AT PORT ARTHUR.
LONDON. May "11.?The Chee Foo J
correspondent of The Reuter Telegram
Company, sends an unofficial report
that the Russans have destroyed j '
their r.'eet at Port Arthur. i .
LONDON, May 11.?The Central ; i
News has a dispatch from Uao Yang j :
stating that the first train from Lino i
Yang" reached Port' Arthur yesterday. ! 1
The railway officials saw no Japanese j 1
troops near the railway. Japanese <
horsemen, the correspondent adds, t
have been observed behind Feng- ?
Wang-Cheng.
j
ST. PETERSBFRG. .May 31.?There <
is a deep suspicion here that the nil- t
opposed reopening of the Port Arthur a
railway is due to the fact that the t
Japanese'are concentrating somewhere r
on the Liao-Tung Peninsula, prepara- r
tory to a marcli in force either on t
Port Arthur or northward to support r
General Kurilco. This is the only tena- :
ble theory, as it is known that no bat- ?
tie has been fought on the Peninsula, c
and that the Japanese have not. been
forced to abandon the railway. \
r
LONDON. May 11.?The Central r
News has a dispatch from its Paris c
correspondent who quotes telegrams ?
from St. Petersburg reporting a Jap- ti
anese repulse twenty kilometres east c
of Port Adamsr Diao Tung Peninsula, j;
The Japanese were attempting to cut 1
the railway when they were attacked n
by six thousand Russians under Gen- n
? v
(Continued on -Uh page.") v
p : l !
10NT PARK. ;
\
view of this park from the river. (
/g by a score of amusements on A
es can be secured, the best of order *
make the Park a pleasant family
- *- ** "? U. ? ?r. r. 'Roniltv." ^
i, at <*: f. ivi.. cue we.
ry two hours, landing at East Fair- 1
ts, including dancing on the splendid 1
= available for passengers. Special
:hes and societies for excursions on
/hich stop in front of the Park.
THE "PEACEMAKER"
WILL BE A TREAT TO ALL WHO
CAN ATTEND?MAY POLE
DANCE WILL BE A I
FEATURE.
"The Peacemaker," which win be
presented at the Grand to-night for
the'benefit of the local fire department,
will be greeted by a fairly large crowd. t
of which a majority will be First
w-ar<l people, in whose interests the
benefit is to be given. The play tonight
will without a doubt be much
more complete than it was a short
time ago, when presented by Miss
Simmons, as no time and expense
have been spared to make the play
the very best possible.
One feature about this performance
is the May Pole dance given by about
15 young girls of town. This dance
is one of" the most unique and cute affairs
ever presented to the public
here.
Miner Hurt.
Salvatore BeccaJoiee was brought
to the Miner's Hospital, last evening.
Buffering front a badly crushed leg.
He was hurt In the mines at Watson.,
AMERICAN ,
COTTON
MAN L>r ACTUfl ZfiV ASSOCIATION jc
is MOW IN h^ssior;?HUNEREOS
AF O ELSGATES
ARE PRESENT.
ASIA IS THE WORLD'S LARGEST T
IMPORTER Or COTTON MANUFACTURES,"
SAYS SECRE- j
TAKY CORTELYOU.
WASHINGTON. D. C., Map 11.? i
The eighth -annual convention r.t the I a
Vmcrican Cotton ^Itinufrterni err' A:- 1 tl:
*ociatioti ovjeno:.l at the Arlington j h<
i-lotcl this morning, several hundred j cc
aierr.l;ers .being present. The meet- di
ns was called to order by President C
Of. C. Heath, of North Carolina, who Si
ater delivered the annual address. 1/
covering e activities of the associa- el
:ion and the Industry during the past sc
re ar. * i dl
Secretarj Cortelyou. of the Depart'
nent of Commerce and J?abor. wel- b;
mnied the delegates in the name of B
he President, announcing: that if V
voukl be a source of ni-icli satisfac- bi
ion for the President to arrange to ai
neet the members of the association T
md their ladies at iho White House ol
o-niorrow afternoon. Mr. Cortelyou in
Iwelf upon the progress made in the
manufacture of cotton in the United ni
states and opportunities for trade with 01
>tber countries.
The value of goods imported from the
arious countries would amount"' to
n>:>re than $1100.000,000 'annually, or
>ractically double the value of the
otton manufacturing of the United
States in 10DO. Our cotton mills man- lb
[factured loss than one million bales
>f cotton in 1870, two million bales
n 1880, about two and one half milion
bales in 1800: three and one-half
nillion. bales in 1000 and over four '"1
oil lion in 1902. In 190M, the amount
ras slightly reduced by reason of the
innsuallv Iiigh price of the raw mate
ial.
"Asia is the world's largest, importer
f cotton manufactures'," he said, "and th
n Asia the United States is rapidly jn
;aining a market for ail classes of its wj
iroducts, especially manufactured, ni
V'ith a return to normal conditions p
n that part of the world, 1 trust that nr.
re shall see the greatest cotton prolucing
country turning more and more of
>f its cotton into the manufactured or
orm before sending it abroad and sup- wj
dying the finished goods, more and or
nore to foreign markets. With our
ount.ry so favorably situated, in all th
he essentials of cotton production th
,ml manufacture, with the most per- M
ect machinery and most industrious, of
uteliigent and best paid workingmen, If
believe that we may confidently ex- no
>ecr. that the cotton manufacturers pa
if the world will prosecute still more Y<
Igorously their foreign trade. Ilf
"If at any time this association A.
eels that the new department of 0.
{overtimelit can lie of any service to iui
t, and il' you are good enough to ad- W
dse us of your desires, we shall en- te
leavor to do promptly and effectively 01
vhatever is possible to advance your F1
n teres ts." Y<
The rest of the day's session was \V
levoted to hearing papers by- various Ij.
jiembers of the association on ques- gc
ions of interest to the trade. to
TWENTOIVE \
TEAMS I
Zause of Unfounded Rumor?They
Are L.ocal Horses Moved From
One Piece of Work to
Another.
e*
A procession of about twenty-five ^
si
earns through the central part of the
:lty last evening is responsible for
the rumor that is afloat to-day to the
Dffect that the "Wabash contractors
ire moving their stuff away from this
vicinity. di
The truth of the matter is that si
Hamilton & Irvin are sending their al
teams from the Belt Line, where they P<
have finished up on the Monongah
Glass plant grading, to complete tliej1"
work left unfinished at Belleview T
Heights last fall.
ci
I have three of the very best lots in
tlic Morrow Addition for sale, at a d
very low price. H. H. Lanham. x t]
A source of pi insure Is to wear
Dorothy Dodd Oxfljrd.
C. p. HIGHLAND. -V d
4NNUAL
MEETING
>F THE STOCKHOLDERS OF THE
PUBLISHERS' PRESS ASSOCIATION
WAS HELD YE3H!S
IS OF INTEREST TO OUR
READERS A3 THE ASSOCIATION
FURNISHES OUR TEL- 4
EGRAPHIC SERVICE
NEW YORK, Mar 11.?Tho Eighth
initial meeting of I ho stockholders of
10 Publisher's Press -Assoatoth'tt was
Mi! yesterday ia the of the
trporation at NTo. 13 ParR,.ITO v~ Aarow
McLean, of The Brooklyn- N. Y.,
itizen, and Charles,11. Boilnttiy <iC the
l>i iugiield. .Mass.." XiUi.s. and R. P.
awry, of the I-H'ie, Pa..'Herald, were . Jjj
ectod directors to nuceeod them Ives
for a .term of throe days. Three "a
rectors are elected annually...
The Board of Directors.orsaiiii'.od ' "I
electing die following oflleers: J.
. Shale. President; -Andrew McLean,
ice-President: T. K. Kecnan of Piltstrjj,,
Secretary, and Vie CuIIea Bry- .
it, of the Brooklyn, N. V. Times,
reasurer. Tlie annual reports of the - VjS
llccr.s showed the association to be ^
excellent. condition with a large
till in clients during (he past year -
hI a subsianfml increase in rev- |
Y. M. C. A. i
ITERNATIONAL CONVENTION IS
NOW IN SESSION IN BUFFAl-O?
FAIRMONT IS ENTITLED TO
DELEGATES BUT NONE
AVE GONE?FOURTEEN HUNDRED
PERSONS WILL SIT 'J|g
DOWN TO BANQUET DINNER
THIS EVENING.
BUFFALO. N. V.. Mav 11.-- More
an three hundred delegates/ to the
ternational Y. AX. ' A. convention,
hioli opens here to-day arrived last ? /
cht. Eleven hundred "more are ex cted
this morning and this after-..
The delegates come from all parts
He- united Stales and Canada. ,J3v- y
State and territory id.'tile;' Union >
ill be represented by the committee hi
sanizecl this afternoon. "'"''S
-Miss Helen Gould will ho one of
e distinguished guests.
ose who have arrived are: 12. C.
or.se. New York, General Secretary 5
the International committee; C. Jieks.
of New York. Senior Interitional
Secretary of the Railroad do- J
irtmerit: S. F. Goodwin of New , ?
irk, International Secretary for Re- SIpsII
;ious Work, and noted in Y. M- Ccircles
as an evangelist for men; |
C. Michener, of New York, Inter- j
itional Secretary fox Industrial . '
orlc: John Clover, of New York, In- .
rnational office Seetetary: C- K.
ier. of New York , International 3
eld Secretary; E. M. v'v'iUIs, of New
irk, International Office Secretary-; ' .
alter L. Douglasis, of Philadelphia,
W. Messer. of Chicago, C. L. Cog- * ^
iti. President of the Y. M. C. A. Inrnational
Training School aL :
iringfield. .Mass.; John \V. Hansel. '
resident of Hie Internationa! Y. M.
A. Training Sciioo! at Chicago;
20. H. Coxhead, General S?c^tai-y - . .. ns
Si. I.ouis; E. F. Slice, Secretary at
rookiyn: George J. May, general
jcretary at Scranton, C. J. Shultler,
moral Secretary at Cleveland; Geo. . '|j
Haffey, General Secretary at I3osn,
and many others prominent in as- , Jpfjli
iciation affairs.
This Avenixt'z one of the features
the convention will take place in v.:i|
e form of a banquet to all the clel- WlM
;atcs at Convention Hall. It is ex- V. ^
icted that about 14bO persons will
down to dinner which will liegin at S|f|
x o'clock.
Condition Favorable. . -4:
FRANKLIN. Pa., May 11.?Tito conlion
of H. W. Breckinridge, who was
tot by a burglar yesterday Is favorlie
this morning. The only clue the
dice have to xvork with is the hat
I the robber, which he dropped dur- . br:
S the struggle with Breckinridgehe
County Commissioners have oi- ."
red $300 reward and the City Coun- V
1 has added $500 reward for the capire
of the robber. At the meeting - ft
C the City Council last night it was
ecided to employ bloodhounds in. '-' 'M
acking the thief.
The Weather.
Fair; warmer to-night and Thurs

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