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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 11, 1904, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092557/1904-05-11/ed-1/seq-7/

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HSBHSSSffiEESSEHBESHSSBBSEBSB
TheKiml Yon Have Always
in nse for over- 30 years
All Counterfeits, Imitatior
Experiments that trifle w
Infants and Children?Ex
What is C
Castoria is a harmless so
goric, Drops and Sootltin
cont.v-ns neitlier Opium,
Tic? o?ro 1C "1+C <
OUUStiiUUC* JLlo? Hp, Vy J.O -?w ;
and allays Fcverislmess.
Colic. Ifc relieves Teethin;
and Flatulency. It assin;
Stomach and Bowels, giv.
Tlie Children's IF'anacea?'
CEBMU ISiSE OAS
?ears ^
The Kind Yon 1
Sn Use For <
THE CENTAOH COMPANY, 77
CbChecfini
Armimts
| 317 Foa
| By our- System <
= that is, making deposits and withdre
= saving than banking in person. A
= your request. Oar capital and reso
= Oar advice, embodying the suecessft
5 is at yoor command.
= Assets ove
comm
6oughanour
REF
Fairmont 3 (
Thursda
The Most Elahora
That will visit y<
THE BEST C?v?l1r(
Ail Entertainment for the
GRAND FREE
EVERY Dd
Positively Two Perform
ADMISSION?Adu
KEEP YOTJB, El
OUR OWN FIRESIDE
Can be made doubly attractive by 1
addition of a handsome
MANTEL.
Perhaps youhave thought about ma
in# a change but feared the expen
might be too great. May be high und
some conditions but not if we do the woi
We would be pleased to have you i
.spect the line of mantels here and al
our book of designs. Then we can su
mit figures which will be quite low.
\AI. A. /WOOREHEAD
Jacobs Building. Monroe street.
mi ' i n im?
3 Bought, and which lias heen.
>, lias home "tlic signature of
. lias heen made under his peral
supervision since its infancy,
iw no .one to deceive you in this,
is and " Jnst-as-good" are but
ith andendanger the health of
perience against Experiment.
^ASTORIA.
ihstitute for Castor Oil, Pareg
Syrups. It is Fleasant. It
Morphine nor other Jiarcotie
fuarantec. It destroys Worms
It cures Diarrlioea and Wind
g Troubles, cures Constipation
lilates tlie Food, regulates the
injf liealtliy :in<l natural sleep,
riie Mother's Fricufl.
TORI A ALWAYS |
e Signature of _
ave Always Bought I
Over SO Years.
MURRAY STREET, fJCVJ YORK CITY.
i
rth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. Mi
- -? ??*? Waii n
iwals. Is just 88 easy and far more time =
little booklet telling why, awaits =
nrces apeak for themselves* =
il bos loess experience of yean, . ?
r $31,000,000 |
0 SOON!
and Frazee's
rIIMED
Circus.
las, commencing
y, May 12.
te Tented Exhibition
)ur city this season.
&*- IN AMERICA
. LADIES AKD CHILDREN.
STREET PARADE
tY AT NOON.
ances Daily?Rain or Shine.
Its 25c, Children 15c.
rE ON THE DATE.
"You Can't Beat Us
Unless You Cheat."
SKINNER'S TAVERN
At the Depot.
The largest and handsomest .
Sample rooms in the Country
located in the new 8200,000.
Court House.
B. G. WILLIA5V3S, Prop.
Fairmont, W. Va.
EVfirs. E. A. iVIcCartney,
L Ladies Tailoring.
j Gentlemen's Cleaning and Repairing.
! Cheapest price for high grade Tailoring.
Third Floor. Carr Building.
sk; HOGS FOR SALE.
er
k. ?n
so 125 stock hogs for sale. 50 to 100
bpountls.
75 black and 50 white
ones.
W. hi. Safterfieid,
Rivesville, W. Va.:
POSTOFFICf
OPENED BY UNCLE SAM AT THE
WORLD'S FAiR.
Government's Exhibit Could Handli
Mail For City of 50.000
People.
ST. LOUIS, Mo.?Uncle Sam opr.-nee
a in ode i postoHice in the govemmen
building. It is a sub-station of'the Si
Louis postoiliec, in charge of Mr. Otis
Gemmer, who was formerly locate*
in the A dm 1 n i m rati on buflding'.' \Vhii<
splendid facilities for the receipt ant
deliver3" oi mail are furnished in. tin
Exposition grounds, it is also an inter
esting exhibit.
The furniture is of the latest model
and in addition to special inquiry win
(lows, has no 'less than 500 loci
boxes at the disposal of postal patrons
The force has been increased by six
teen letter carriers. Postal export?
figure that the model office. which jus
meets present: requirements of Expo
sition visitors and employes, is sufli
cient in size for a city of 50,000 pec
pie.
One of: the interesting features ii
the installation of a model postal em
as a part oi the regular post office
This car was especially built by the
government for an exhibit and now is
manned by a crew of three St. Uouh
postal employes, M. Diebling, R. C
and "W. p. C'oleman.
All outgoing mail, instead of beinj
hanuied by distributors in t.lie brand
postofiice is dumped into the car
There the clerks are pouching rffai
for more than . thirty five different
routes, and yesterday sent seven large
van loads of mail ready for the trains
STATE BUILDINGS
FEW CITIZENS CAN VISIT ALL
THE STATES BUT ALL THE
STATES ARE AT THE FAIR.
The indissoluble union of indestructible
States is well illustrated
in the government and State structures
at the Pair. Emotions of patriotic
pride are aroused by tliem in every
one who rejoices in American cit
izenship. How glad the people of the
United States should be to realize thai
all the Stales can fraternaly assemble
on terms oi perfect equality, o.i an
occasion like this. W iiatever may
have been the nature of tho differ
ences back of the civil war?and sonn
of them were older than the genera
tion involved in the conflict?the
whole people can see now that i lie
greatness of the nation, and tlie fulfillment
of its highest destiny, depend
upon the perpetuity of the Union. All
"the colonies founded the Union, and
all the States are knit together to
shield it in peril and advance it in
the scale of civilization. The end ol
the civil war was the triumph of the
Union idea and not of any faction oi
the people over another faction. Peace
rviped out the lines of division. It
made possible all that has followed
constituting the Union of to-day, the
nation that, through force of duty has
extended its boundaries far beyond
the old limits, and, in the interests oi
the world's commerce as much as :ts
own, is constructing an interoeeanic
highway that only a great country
could pay for or defend.
Among the States and their inhabitants
there are minor points ot contrast.
yet among citizens each is equal
to every other, and each has th: same
share in all that constitutes the general
government or the State. An American
greets another American, r.c
matter from what part of tfco country.
with an overruling sense ol civic
fellowship. Customs may hav" local
peculiarities: points of view as lo business
or matters of social inter -si may
Vtiry it. JliLlU, UllL AiJici ivaii viu-v.u~....;
is the basis of a broad resemblance
thQ tie of a brotherhood that w?!I lasi
through tlie centuries and solve prob
lems of vast"'importance to humanity.
For it. must be remembered that republican
government as a bad in?
force among nations must, stand or
fall with its results in the United
States. The experiment, if it must
still be regarded in that light, has developed
.into something so vast, s<
dominant in mAany ways, that its failure
would endure forever as a discouraging
record and precedent.
Few citizens are able to say that
they have visited all the forty-five
States. But all the States have come
to the Fair, and the scene is inspiring.
The territories also are represented.
States of the future, peopled
from the older commonwealths, and
confident that they, in turn, will fill
the larger sphere with honor to them
selves and- devotion to the "Union,
r,nnrr i? the roll of States carved from
the Louisiana p.urchase. Their history
is an assurance that the country may
continue to grow, to be filled up by
the original stock and the sarin
sources from which it was drawn
There is no North, no South, no East
| no West among the State exhibits
They represent union, patriotism. arn:
1 ity, a generous, mutually helpful ri
valry.. Some States contain ntore in
habitants or square miles than others
but all are alike in big-hearrednes>
and love of country.?GIobo-Domocrat
TO SELL INDIAN
LANDS BY
i _ LOTTERY
Applicants Must Register Their Names
With Government Officials.
WASHINGTON, IX C.. May 11,?
I I'nclo Sam;, will go in to the lottery
^ j business for a little while, as the outcome
of legislation enacted by Con
) : gress in tlic session just ended; for
^ 'opening to settlement lands in seve
C'.al Indian reservations In the AVcstv
I ; Applicants for lands in these reser;
rations -will have to register their
.. ; names with govern nfeiu officials apj
pointed 10 conduct the drawings. In
| the sixty days after the opening, of
. the reservation the lucky seekers for
- homes, determined b> lottery. will
have the chance to select the land
. they want. In this way il\ey will be
* protected from the wild .scramble.
I with the usual attendant bloodshed.
. which has characterized the free home
. entry plan in the past. There a?e no.
table advantages in the plan. It not
| only determines the order of choice.
- | but keeps a record of the people who
! have entered the new lands and how
j uracil they owe the goyernmenl for
. ; the land they have taken up.
. i The reservation lands to be disposed
| of this lime are not to be opened to
i The public free of all charge, as was
I <1 one in the Oklahoma and other open
in&s several years ago hut will be sold
! at a fixed charge. The following" facts
show, in brief, the opportunity for
] the home geekors and how they must,
t j have money to get started this time.
> I instead of only dash and. daring as before.
Lands Are In Northwest.
(.amis to be opened in Montana.
1?1.00,000 acres, to be sold at $1.25 an
acre; limit for any one entry. (MO
" acres; opening in August. Rosebud
reservation. South Dakota, 41(1,000
acres, at $3 an acre: opening in July.
Tied Lake reservation. Minnesota, 400,I
uoo acres; practically same conditions.
. Devil's hake reservation. North Da.
i kota. 104.-31.(5 acres; most fertile lands
. i iii that section of the West, $-1.50 an
. acre; opening' in July.
; Government officials in Washington
who will have general direction of the
plans of execution are confident that;
i the coming drawings will prove more
- successful and satisfactory to every
. one concerned than have any of the
? past, attempts of the government to
help along the home seekers of the
? West.
Previous attempts to distribute free
- land have been attended by the greafl
est disorder, and sometimes by loss
[ of life. The Oklahoma opening was
I the focal point for 30,000 anxious and
t adventurous people, most of thein try.
ing to get something for nothing, with
the idea of disposing of it as soon as
they could realize anything on it.
The real home seekers were put at
a disadvantage by these land butchers,
and 13,000 quarter sections of land
intended for homes went through a
roundabout ownership without any ad- J
vantage to the government and great
^fc-nm.nntooro 1a fho hfimp SPftkeFS. i
By the new plan it is hoped to ob;
viate all these difficulties. Every ap- j
plicant must be registered before lie
draws. When he draws a number and
goes out to select his land he must
pay a fixed price an acre for all he
wants to take up. Having done that,
he will be protected in his rights by
i uie government by civil law in all
- cases and by the military arm of the
government wherever and whenever
? necessary.
The real home seekers will take up
the land in larger proportion than beI
fore, while the prize-seeking desperado
will tirid uus former advantage over
the quiet, peace-loving citizen no loni
ger exists.
|
Queen Draga's Power.
A characteristic story is told about
Draga, the ill-fated Servian Queen, by I
; Via ho Bukovac. the well-known artv.-x
who painted her portrait two years
I ago.
"She wanted mc to make a portrait
- of King Alexander also," lie says "but
? I could not persuade him to give i.ie
- the necessary sittings. Final;/ I ap
pealed to the Queen, and that day at
dinner she said to him: 4Sacha. you
must sit. for your portrait to-day."
" Tvo no t ime for such work,* lie
i answered; 'I've got. to attend a OaV
- inot meeting.'
" 'The meeting must lje postponed,'
t was her reply, 'for I want yon.- portrait,
and, if you iikc I will stay with
I you while you arc sitting for it.'
" 'Oil, if you'll stay with me, it's all
. right,' answered tile King. anil
i straightway lie sent word to hit inin'
isters that lie could not meet too in for
* a fsw days."
According to Viaho Bukovac, praga j
- treated her husband just as though
he were a child, never even allowing |
' him to cat anything 'except; what-she j
. put. on his plate.?-Exchange.
Mrs... Lackey, oi Wiltningtoni Del.,*
is In the city the grhest of her sister. 1
; Mrs. Cbas. E. peed; on Fairmont ave.
nraal " 1 / -
' WILSON WANTS IT
Former Parkersburg Mayor Is a Candidate
For Vice-Presidency If Hearst
Is Named to Head National
Democratic Ticket.
I'AUKERSBpHC, W. Va., May To.?
A wntlomnn of the Southland is
i Henry S. Wilson, of. this city, who has
| been accorded a boom for the Vice-'
| President'.y by the Democracy of
j West Virginia. With J he followers of
j Hearst. Gorman, and Parker alike he
j is much in favor in his homo State.
| if the developments- of two flays can
1 bo taken as a criterion,
j Though, a son of Pennsylvania, this
j aspirant for Vice-President kit honors
I has in his :;2 years of residence here
acquired all of that bearing and tiemeaner
which characterises the native
of "Dixie." Male and hearty, with
the physique of an athlete, he lias the j
general appearance of the well-preserved
man of 50. though he confesses
more than three-score years and ton.
He lias served as mayor of Parkersburg;
and a tenn or two on a State
Mr. Wilson declares that 1)0
j belongs to the cbnsorvaiives. and that
his views harmonizo so well with
those of William Randolph iloarsi:
that ho is wilting: to play second fiddle !
10 the New York editor-candidate. I
j CALL FOR REPUBLICAN DISTRICT,
CONVENTIONS.
i
j To the Republican voters of Marion
county:
Conventions of the Republican pat
j ty of the several magisterial districts
i of Marion county are hereby called
i t o nicet on Saturd ay, the 41 h da y of
June,"11904, at 2 o'clock P. AI.. for the
purpose of electing: delegates to the
following named conventions:
To the State nominating convention
to be held in Wheeling on the 12th
day of July. "1.00-1.
To the Judicial convention to be
held in Morgantown on the Stli dtu*
of June, 1904, at. 10 o'clock A. M.
To ilie Senatorial convention to he
hereafter called.
Also to transact such other business
as may properly come before said
clistrict conventlons.
The said several district conventions
will be held at the respective
places hereinafter named; and will
elect the number of delegates herein
after designated, and jio more, that
is to say:
Fairmont district convention will
meet at the Court-house in the City
of. Fairmont, and is entitled, to elect
the following number of delegates:
To the State convention, 6.
To the Judicial convention, 9.
To the Senatorial convention, 9.
Grant district convention will meet
in Monongah (meeting place to lie
provided by district committeeman).
State convention, 3.
Judicial convention, 5.
Senatorial convention, 5.
Lincoln district convention will
meet at Farmington school house:
State convention, 3.
Judicial convention. 5.
Senatorial convention, 5.
Mannington district will meet at
Town of Mannington at school hoitse.
State convention, S.
Judicial convention, 11.
Senatorial convention, 11.
Pawpaw district will meet at Nep!
tune school house.
State convention, 2.
Judicial convention, 3.
Senatorial convention, 3.
Union district will meet in the
First ward of the City of Fairmont,
at the school house.
State convention, -1.
Judicial convention,^ G.
Senatorial convention, G. ?
VVinfleld district convention will
meet in Alt. Harmony school house.
State convention. 3.
Judicial convention, 5.
Senatorial convention, 5.
it is requested that in making selection
of delegates, that only those
he selected who are likely to attend
the convention to which they are
made delegates. The call for eke
"State convention siaies mat no pi'M:es
-will be admitted as delegates.
By order of the Executive Committee.
HARRY SHAW, Chairman.
A. Lj. LEHMAN, Secretary.
Dated April 30, 1901&
Paving Porter Alley.
A force of men is at work 011 the
paving of Porter alley. This is of
especial interest to us, as it is along
the side of our shop. With the paving
and the laying of the water main on j
i Monroe street, this is a pretty busy I
locality just now.
A plain drunk was up this morning.
Officer Shaw found it on Bridge street.
The local company of National
Guards had a- street drill last night.
Homer Bell, ol' Maple avenue, had
| a finger badly hurt while playing ball
[yesterday. :
Mrs. G. P.' Carroll will leave for
Pittsburg to-nioriow- morning, where
she will be the of Mrs. Mary
HEARST MEN
AND DUNLOP
< MEET IN SECRET SEcS!ON AND,
TALK THINGS" OV.ER ' CON2^H|
CERNIMG TO-MORROW'S V
CONVENTION.
TREASURER OF DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL
COMMITTEE GOES TO
INDIANAPOLIS FOR CONFERENCE.
-'"qS
IXRi.WAI'OI.IR, tad., May. II.?As
| State convention tiny apprt?acliesj the ;J
I sent iir.ent against uninKiructcd ifleiei-; -.V?p
| gates to the national Democratic am- g?|
volition is Browing.
Tlio Democrats will, hold tlieir State
[convention for the selection of dole-*' ".'e-J
gates May 12, and the Hearst. .*
porters in tue Stale are putting forlli J, sJ.jgj
their host efforts to keep the sentimcnt
against instructed delegates
growing. - - ;
Already many prominent Democrats
who are known as conservative and favorable
(o Parker have deolarctl : Sv|
against ins!ructions. The reniarfcalilo jjjthing
about I his is thai, all these' men
nr.' i-h>st; Tagg art's rigluluuul men,
and always v.orlc together. 'Tagg&rt,. .'J
according to all indications, is a red
I.at Parker man, and will leave no '
tone unturned to accomplish his end
I ill ail manors political. U is a rule- -wj
or-ruin policy in next week's conven- . - A
; lion i '<;! ween Vaggnrt ami the Hearst.
SI P. D'nilop, of Chicago, treasurer ' %
ot the UtmtocraCic National Committoe.
vvn:- in liidianaxiplis' Sunday iu sis-.
cr.'i conferences with many of tlKS v p\ A?|
i Icars! men. hut just what, was dia- . :
one, ! nn one will divulge.
Ouahip, it will he remembered, is " '"a?
tite line who lid such etTect-ve work "d"
for Hearst itt Illinois, and whose dele- ?
gates are practically for htm now. , *<yj|
Although Hearst lias not the -ghost ;
of a show to get the Indiana delegates,
nevertheless his lieutenants are working
hard for an tin instructed delcga- t
tion.
"OPENTHOP"
.. .; .j v:.;
MAY NOT BE OPPOSED BY THE
AMALGAMATED ASSOCIA TION
OF IRON, STEEL AND TIN
WORKERS.
A* AX' co-r-ADi ICU A DOCrcnjrruT
1WIA\ T I? O I nUk.toi ? r-% t . .... - .
OF MUCH IMPORTANCE ' *&?
ON THE LABOR
QUESTION. 0&?*k
PITTSBURG. Pa., May
Amalgamated Association of . ggj
Stool and Tin Workers may not
pose the attempt of the United States v
Steel Corporation to introduce tfce
"Open shot)" system at all the: mQIs
of the subsidiary companies. This
important and somewhat scn-ationai %
information was received to-da?* from .
several delegates who "have been attending
the convention at Cleveland
during the past week. According to
official advices, the latest effort of the
steel combine meets with the approral
of several Officials of the Amalgamated mm
Association. If the present'plana materiaiize,
the trust will likely receive ?
the support of ihe big organizations
thus saving the former thousands of
dollars.
From a highly reliable source it has
been ascen alned ? that the report or
President Shafer urges that every zntll 1'
in the country be declared "Open" and
includes the mills controlled by the '
independent manufacturers as well as
the combine. Strong hopes are entertained
that the resolution wili be .fpi
adopted 'by tlio convention. Th'.s i" ,.
the first lime in the history ??r the
Amalgamated Association that the
course in question was seriously' considered.
If the course Is decided ou
the great fight i jet ween capital rutsrl la- ,*"j
bor as far as the' Amalgamated ?s con- , _ J|
cerneil. will he ended. Ho yearly
agreements will arise to form a Ijrcrtclt v
of contention between employers suitd < *<1
employes. It is generally thought that '. \>|
a precedent will be established Jor , ^
other labor organizations to prrrstte.
The abolishing oi the annual contracts ;
will likely solve the labor problem
which at present confronts the corn
WENT TO BELL
VIE HOSPITAL
_
NEW YORK. May 11.?Edward JI,
son of . Cyrus W. Field is aaain jr> the 1 ?
alcoholic yard at llelivuc- Hospital
for treatment. He went to the .hospital
himself and was examined by
Dr. Richards. A month. ia go he wasto '%
the hospital for the same complaint, ,-.j3
and at that time at the request ofhis
son. Dr. Cyrus Field, of tfte JBoartl '3|
of Health, he was examined as io-.ltIs" sanity.
He said, he "was a brokfija'anfl ^
- ~..-LT '
-'.Stimhier'^^t'.'

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