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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 16, 1904, Image 1

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Fniniumt We&t Dirgtmmt, ?r
VOLUME I. FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA, 3LONDAY, 31AV 1(>, 1904. NU3JBER 24. |
ATOERMOTT
BEAT GRANT
BY A MAJORITY OF 632?BARKER
WON FOR SHERIFF BY A
BIG VOTE.
CHARLEY GOODWIN WAS SWAMPED
FOR PROSECUTING ATTORNEY?AMMONS
ANO WARMAN
jGO TO THE LEGIS__
LATURE.
(Morgantown Post.)
The Republican primary election
Tie III at the twenty-six precincts of
the county Saturday, resulted in the
selection of the following ticket:
State Senator?Joseph H. McPer
mott
House of Delegates?Zimri Amanons
and Altha Warman.
Counts' Commissioner?William H.
Phillips.
Sheriff?T. W. Barker.
Prosecuting Attorney?C. W. Cramer.
County Surveyor?George \V. Johnson.
Assessor?(East Side), George E.
"Vangilder.
Assessor?(West Side), Peter B.
Core.
The primary aroused more local interest
than have many Presidential
elections. There was a screen thrown
out in front of the postoffice, and a
large crowd stood in the streets until
two o'clock Sunday morning watching
"the returns. By that time it was evident
that McDermott had a lead that
Grant could not overcome, though v ho
would be selected for the Legislature,
the county commissionership and
for prosecuting attorney was sli'I a
question with a big question man:" after
it.
Early in the evening it was evident
that Barker was running ahead of
his competitors for tne shrievalty and
that Vangilder and Core were wayahead
for the East and West Side
assessorships. Johnson for surveyor
had no opponent, so very little aitention
was paid to his vote.
According to the latest unofficial
returns McDermott received 1,597
votes to Grant's SC5 for the Senatorship.
This gives the former a majority
of G32. Captain Garrison is next
with 757 .votes, 20S behind Grant. Oereau
Brings up,, the rear with 2G.
That Captain Ga-rrison did iiol col]
a larger vote is a surprise to many
who picked him for the winner.
"'Grant and McDermott will divide the
city and Garrison will carry the co mty,"
was a prediction that was given
wide currency before the primary, ii
was also said that Garrison being in
the race would tend to cut McDeranott's
total, but that also seems to bo
a fallacy. It looks much more as if
Garrison had cut Grant's vote than
-that the reverse is true. Geres it's
small vote was not unexpected, there
being several bets at heavy odds that
his total would not reach 100.
In the race for sheriff, Barker had
: "11 tvov T-Tic vntn wa s
uiuiga uti ma ?-??11 ??uj. ..?1,480.
Morgan came next with 52S:
Arnett had 507: Coombs 30G and Sine
141.
Cramer and Snee for prosecuting attorney
ran the closest or any candidates
on the ticket. 'Which was ilic
winner was not e\ ident until Saturday
afternoon when the last precinct tvas
heard from. Cramer polled 1,033
"votes to Snee's 1.022. John dtfealed
Goodwin, the votes being 572 and 55"
respectively.
Although he was sick in bed and
tinable to canvass Vangihler received
the largest vote polled. Twenty-two
hundred and thirty-seven ballots were
cast for him and SC5 for Hawkins. his
competitor for the East Side assessorship.
Core easily won out on the assessorship
for the West Side, his vote being
1.33S to 1,324 for Martin and 2SS lor
Morris.
There was a good deal of drunken
ness 3n i lie city anu more ui- ies.s m
the county. Several small fights occurred.
but none of tliem very serious.
At the polling places good order was
maintained.
5* 4DEADLOCK
IN INDIANA.
V ! J.
No Nomination For Governor A
J. Has Yet Been Made?Several .J.
Dark Horses Mentioned.
l* 4"
4. SPRLNTGFIELD, 111., May 1C.
J. ?Governor Yates sprang the .J.
J. sensation of the convention by 4?J.
saying he was offered a Feder-J.
al appointment worth $17,000 4.
-J. to $18,000 a year to give way to 4.?
Frank O. Lowden. 4
4* / -J*,
4* 4* 4? 4* *5* 4* 4* 4" 4,-4* 4* 4* 41 4*
BIG MEETINGS
i
WILL TAKE PLACE AT ST. LOUIS
THIS WEEK?NATIONAL EDIj
TORI AL ASSOCIATION WILL
BE IN SESSION.
I
ST. LOUIS, Mo., May iG.?St. Louis
expects to entertain one of the largest
crowds in the history of the city during
this week. To the number of individual
visitors of the world's fair
will be added thousands of delegates
who come to attend the first of the
series of national and international
conferences to be held here during
the summer. Today the International
Press Congress will begin its sessions.
This meeting will be attended
by famous journalists and newspaper
workers from all parts of the
United States and from most of the
countries of Europe. Canadian journiiasts
will hold a meeting during the
week and there will also be meetings
of the National Editorial Association,
the trade press associations and the
State organization ol editors. The
second big gathering of the week will
begin on Tuesday. This will be the
biennial conventionof the General Federation
of the Women's Club. The advance
guard of delegates to this meetnig
has already put in an appearance
and it is expected that by noon to-day
tbere will be hundreds of representative
women here from every State
and Territory of the Union. A contest
for the presidency of the federation
is on and there will be other
features of the gathering that will undoubtedly
cause it to be one of the
most notable in the history of the or|
ganizatiou.
THEBEAUTY
DID A FINE BUSINESS YESTERDAY?
FOUR HUNDRED AND
SEVENTY-FIVE PEOPLE
VISiTED EAST FAIRMONT
PARK.
Notwithstanding the extremely bad
day, three hundred and twenty-live
people enjoyed the trip to East Fairmont
Park on the barge "Beauty"
yesterday afternoon, and one hundred
and fifty last night. This certainly is
encouraging to the management, and
I more than anycjnng eise iu^
j gratified at the good class of people
who patronized them.
A litle delay was experienced botli
going and returning, at the lock.
This was caused by the large side
wheel excursion boat "Columbia,"
which was locking through when the
"Beauty" arrived. On the return trip
the little steamer "Pastime" was in,
and this caused a fifteen minute delay.
The park surpasses all expectations,
even in its unfinished state. Mr. Devenny
smiled at the comments ot
the crowd, and whispered "wait about
two weeks." Captain Klein, in speaking
of the crowd, said that he never
saw people who could get so much
enjoyment out of anything, and still be
so well behaved. He semed to think
the presence of a policeman unnecessary,
but M err i field is a fixture.
As we mentioned before, the park
is unfinished, but it will be remembered
that the work was started last
Tuesday and but very little more will
be needed, for the place is a "natural
born" park.
Mr. Devenny intends to give Fair
raont a pane wnicn win ub
none in this section of the country.
NO TELEGRAMS
From Port Arthur to New Chwang For
Three Days.
. NEW CHWANG, May 10.?The
Russian authorities here admit that
the railway to Port Arthur, practically
ceased working* Th<? wires are
also interrupted as no telegram has
been received from Port Arthur for
three days past.
Word reached here to-day that the
Japanese dispatch boat Myankc
struck a mine and was destroyed in
Kerr Bay yesterday. There were
eight casualties.
REMAINS OF MRS. WILSON
Were Brought From Clarksburg Here
For Burial.
- - - -rem.
The remains 01 mrs. wunam ....
son were brought to Fairmont from
Clarksburg last evening. Intermeni
was made in "Woodlawn cemetery this
afternoon.
Mrs. Wilson was Miss Opal Layman
daughter of the late Joshua Layman,
of this city. / 1
POLES
"ARE THE MOST MISERABLE AND
j MOST UNHAPPY PEOPLE IN
THE WORLD," SAVS THE
POPE.
BERL1X. May 1C.?The Rome cor
respondent of the Koenlnische Zeitung
learns that the Pope has offended
the German. Austrian and Russian
Emperors by expressing too much
sympathy toward the Poles.
"Recently," he says, "a deputation of
Poles from the three empires, including
three archbishops, four bishops,
two princes, ten barons and ten
counts presented to the Pope an address
complaining of tyranny." The
Pope in cotirse of a sympathetic reply,
said: "You are the most miserable
and most unhappy people in the
world."
This reply was regarded in Berlin.
St. Petersburg and Vienna as a reflation
on the policy of the three emperors
toward the poles.
The German papers sharply criticize
the speech.
BB k f\
1U PEOPLE
PASSED THROUGH
HOULT LOCK YESTERDAY?
THERE WOuLD HAVE BEEN
MANY MORE HAD T1-1E DAY
BEEN WARM.
A large number of people took advantage
of the excursions on the river
yesterday. The looks at Hoult
lock show that 74S rassengers went
through. On the Columbia, 118; the
Beauty, 325: the J. O. Watson. 75; the
Pastime and Hazel Watson. 200; During
the day l?l lockings were made.
Alt' Richmond was slightly injured
while working the gates. His son,
Claude was hurt in the same way a
few days ago.
The "John Brown" which plies between
Ferguson's old camp and the
lock got through titis morning. Cap
tain Hoult had some trouble as it
sprung a leak and came near sinking.
The genial captain had to do some
hard pumping to save his valuable cargo.
SECRETLY MARRIED
HER COACHMAN DID DOWAGER
COUNTESS AND LONDON IS
ALL AGOG OVER IT.*
LOXDOa', May C.?London is doing
nothing else but talk of the news of
tne secret wedding of Emma Sophia
Georgiana, Dowager Countess of Ravensworth,
to her coachman, James
William Wads worth, winch took place
April 30 and has just been announced.
The couple are now on their honeymoon.
The ceremony was jierformed
at St. Georges Hanover square, and no
one was present except the bride and
bridegroom, two witnesses and the
olficiating clergyman. The bridegroom
is a smart, handsome young man oi
about 2S years of age and is also described
as the son of an estate agent
who had been before the wedding at
Kingstrut Mews.
i ne countess is a daughter of the
late Right Honorable Richard Denrnan
and married in 1ST2 Major Oswin C.
Baker Cresswell. and secondly, in 1S92,
the second Karl of Ravcnswortli who
died in 1303.
For some four months "NVadsworth
had acted as coachman to the countess,
and it is a further curious feature
that during the week following the
ceremony he continued to live at the
Mews and resumed his duties as
coachman.
CARDINAL GIBBONS
TALKS CONCERNING THE VISIT
'OF CARDINAL SATOLLI TO THIS
COUNTRY.
BALTIMORE, Md., aiay 16.?Cart
,
, dinal Gibbons, when pressed to explain
the meaning of the coming visit
of Cardinal Satolli to this country,
said that he did not lcnorv anything in
regard to the latter's intention while
i in the United States, nor was he aware
that Satolli's visit will any way affect
church music in this country.
It has heen asserted that the visit
of cardinal tsatoiii to tins cuuiicij
: for tlie purpose of arranging matters
; touching on the Pope's decree calling
for the re-establishment of the Gre.
gorlan Chant in all the Roman Cath,
loic churches and the elimination of
women singers front the choirs.
' CANE RACK
WAS PUT OUT OF BUSINESS FOR
AWHILE. BUT <S NOTHING
DAUNTED BY ITS DISCOMFITURE.
MONEY AND A REVOLVER GO IN
WITH A CANE IF YOU HIT
THE RIGHT
ONE.
Although we have a few gambling
places in our city which run all ;
the time, they are behind closed doors.
Saturday our Honorable Mayor li- j
censed a gambling device to be operated
almost on the Court-house square.
This was rather an innocent looking
contrivance, but is it not these innocent
looking things that start our
young people to gambling? This gam
bling device is the cane rack, where
you buy a few rings and try to "ring"
a cane. Of course the cane which
you ring immediately becomes your
property.
JsTow, to a Prohibition Mayor, who
has stood in the pulpit instead of on
thje street corner, this may not appear
to be gambling. But when a revolver
or a dollar bill is fastened to a cane
what name would you give to it?
Surely, that would be gambling.
This cane rack did a fairly good
business Saturday night, and promised
to be a success this week. But
no. that was not: to be. lor some time
Sunday morning, while our policemen
were walking around the other side
of the square, some detestable, villainous
disciple of Satan carried that,
ornamental cane rack, with its valuable
oi!-cloth covering, down Jetferson
street and threw it over the bank
opposite Governor Fleming's residence,
t/c.T-r-i',1 v- mtitilnrmc the "innocent
thing." J: is not known just what
time the crime was committed, but
Ohicf Morgan says it. must have been
done after two o'clock.
We believe in the enforcement of
the laws by the proper authorities,
but the people will uot stand lor any
such devices on our streetsTo-day
the owner is building a new
stand and will be ready for business
to-night. lie has.paid ?3 license and
will run all week.
THE COLUMBIA
CAME AS" FAR AS THE F., M. AMD
P. BRiDGE YESTERDAY?HAD
MANY PITTSBURGER5
ASOARD.
The Columbia, the most beautiful
boat that lias ever come above Morgantown,
came up from Pittsburg: to
the F., -VI. and P. bridge yesterday,
but could not get. under by at least ten
feet. There were about 150 passengers
on hoard from Pittsburg and other
points along the river who wanted
to see our city, hut several did not
come up because they did not want to
change boats.
The Columbia is 172 feet long, lias
sixty-eight state rooms, 341 berths,
and is practically new, having been
built in 1S93. She was in charge of
Captain R. 1.. Demain and a competent
crew, and makes fourteen miles
an hour.
The Marine band, of Morgantown,
furnished excellent music for the passengers.
Captain Demain said he
would make regular excursions up
here, and hoped that the bridge would
be raised so that he could come up to
the mucli-talked-of city of Fairmont.
Mrs. Catherine Lester Dead.
Mrs. Catherine Lester, mother of
Ed. Lester, the popular clerk at Sam
I>. Iseman's store, died at her home at
Blacksville, Monongalia county, last
night:. She had been very low for several
days and her death was no surprise.
tier son was called home one
day last. week.
A. L. Heffner, of this city, will attend
he funeral, which will take place
to-morrow.
Anniversary Celebration.
A large crowd attended the fifteenth
anniversary services of the Epworth
League at the " First M. E.
church last evening, 'mere was no
preaching and the time was taken up
by the Leaguers, klrs. J. Engle gave
a temperance talk tlnd JIlss Alice
White gave the history of the League.
Talks were given by several others.
New Comers to Fairmont.
Charles Heathcote, of Morgantov. n;
John H. Paulus, Thos. J. Shausnessey,
C. C. Taylor, Chas. Well, Witl,?<n
Weil and Ed. Thackery, from 3Iannington,
arrived here yesterday to work
in the Crown Window Glass factory.
J. T. Boggess, of Clarksburg, Is In
town.
CREW SAVED
!
(eighteen shipwrecked fish- t
er.men brought to new
wrk by the ward line
steamer seneca.
Xi.W YORK. May 1C.?-The Ward
j Line Steamer. Seneca, which arrived
| to-day brought IS shipwrecked flsh;
ermen. H,
The seamen were Captain Mess p,
(and IT men, the crev,- of the fishing th
| schooner ' Blacaides which was 1 un ,a
j down and sunk by the Ward Line W(
steamer Moro Castle from New York W(
( for Havana, on Saturday evening, at ta
3:45 o'clock in a dense fog. The col- 0f
lision occurred about three miles east
by south from Abescom hlglit. Yl.c u
crew- launched a boat and all w-ere f)
saved. II,
The Placnides sunk within seven |1C
minutes of being struck. They were pa
taken on board the Moro Castle which
proceeded anu on Sunday morning, off yc
Cape Henry, were transferred to the |)tl
Seneca bound to the North. The v>la- |).
icades was from Virginia Beach with t|,
i-vi'.Mcfin,] stiir. fish for Pulton Mar- ?i
I let.
fT?o.
COMES IN FOR SOME REMARKS BY
CAPTAINS LEONARD AND ATCHISON
CONCERNING THE
F.. M. AND P. BRIDGE.
Captain .1. E. .Leonard and Captain
Atchison, of the steamer J. E. Leon- Y(
ard, are emphatic in their denunciation
of the Baltimore and Ohio company's
attitude in regard to the bridge
below town.
Captain Atchison said to a representative
of this paper: "I have been in \y
the steamboat business since a child; si
in fact I ran away from school in the
early eighties to become a cub pilot |)(
on the Ohio river, i have piloted Vv
boats from New Orleans to the head of Wi
navigation on the Monongahela and hi
Allegheny, also on all the navigable {a
tributaries of the Ohio, and I am wii- ,,,
ling to make affidavit that tiii.s bridge j1(
here is the most dangerous obstacle ?|
to navigation that I ever saw. it Is
an outrage," lie continued. "I don'r ^
blame you people up here for kicking. rc
You have a kick coming. "Why, I have J3
to shut off and let the boat drift from
a long distance on either side of the or
bridge until 1 get right under it, and 0j
then drive her for all she worth to j?
keep from nituiig me pier vi uumv. ja
There should never have been any argument
about raising that bridge. It
is a self-evident violation, and a rani: IT
obstruction to river business." [j*
The reporter asked "How about Jl
taking a tow of coal through there?"
The pilot withered him with a look.
"It is utterly impossible. You will
never see coal moved down this river
while that bridge stands in its present
condition."
hast, night was as dark as pitch, yet
Captain Atchison took his boat safely
down and back without the slightest
mishap. IS
One of the most rigidly enforced
laws regarding river business is the
one pertaining to lights on an obstruction
in the streams, such as bridge
piers. The bridge below town lias no r(
lights whatever, notwithstanding that jI3
red lights should be shown on all piers. st
and green ones should designate the m
channel. tc
R
Declared a Dividend. d<
Nb wr YORK, May 10.?The Standard
Oil Company of New Jersey has aj
declared a dividend of eight dollars
per share, payable June 15. 'iliis is fn
compared with a dividend of seven ai
dollars for the same period last year. n<
including the dividend declared to-day. tc
The company has thus far declared
24 dollars in dividend, on each share
this year.
B
Will Get Ovation. v/
MOHGANTOIVN, May 1C.? (Spe- w
cial.)?A special from Woostcr, Ohio, m
says tnat W. V. U. defeated Wooster 01
University 5 to 3 Saturday. iTliis
is the fifth game W- V. IT. has id
won in as many days. Today they
play Ohio State at Columbus. They ^
will get a monstrous ovation when
they return to Morgantown. .j
4
Will Take Up the Work. .J
Friday evening the teachers of the .J
High School and a large number of .J
the pupils who will enter the Fairmont
High School next year met Mrs. ^
Virginia Engle, B. L. Butcher and Mrs. ^
Lucy Sheets; directors of the Library ^
Association, and talked over the question
of the summer's reading for the
pupils. The latter 'seemed Interested ^
in the work andVwill begin the work ^
soon. v ^
TOO COLI)
O ENJOY THE ATTRACTIONS AT
THE MONONGAH PARK YES- . }
TERDAY-JJUNKINS' BAND
TOOK AN OUTING BUT
DID NOT PUAY AT
THE PARK.
Owing to the bad'weather yesterday
o Junkins Band did not go to the
iri: near Tvlouongab. Supt. Hood, ot - SlI
e Street etir Co.. had promised to 5 ||?
Ice the band for an outing and if the .
aather had been favorable, they
:mld have gone to the park. He did
ke them on a special car to the end I
the line.
A good crowd --vent to the park but
was too cold for them to stay long. :
opinion lif ail is that, it will bo a ||HH
te place when fixed up. It win * ?
mdy to Fairmont and will l>c wen fjjgB
It was thought by a great many that
isterday was the opening of the park
" -"* Tbo T>yrtIrtyi
il SIICII H US I1UC LUC CLL.1C. ?uv
in<i was to give its concert there, but
e opening ot the park will not take
ace until about the first of June.
Is the intention to have it opened
lt.li a ball gaire about that time. The
ionilist will be a big event, with
enty of nniusehients, and everybody
ill have a good time.
WHEELING
DUNG MAN DROWNED AX ANNAPOLIS?WAS
A STUDENT IN
THE NAVAL ACADEMY.
WHEELING, W. Va? May Hi.? :
Midshipman Phillip Brittingham, of ...
heeling, was drowned at Annapolis unlay
afternoon. He, with four oth- ' '/j
u'idsiiipmci: were out in a small
iat, which capsized. All the others
ere rescued. Young Brittinshani
is the only son'of Rev. Jacob Britigham.
rector of St. Luke's Protcsut
Episcopal church of Wheeling. Ho
adnated at Llnslev Institute at the
. ad of his class and was very poplie
was appointed to the , Naval j
cademy one year ago last fall by j
commendation of Co ngrc><inism R jas
, Dovenor.
His mother, who has been dead sov- .
al years, was Miss Florence Shears,
Mooreltelu. at wmcn pmco saw
tried. Her son's remains will be
... by her side.
BETTER '
STAY
HERE
. THE ADVICE GIVEN HIS FELLOW
MINERS BY SAMUEL 4
BISSETT. h|
Samuel Bisselt, a miner from this S
Men who was one of the number of
en taken to Colorado to brealc the
rlke in the coal fields, has returned.- ; AS?
r. Bissett's advice to coal miners is
i stay here. Ho went to Canyon City, v
oval Gorge, Brooksfde mines, ana
nvn in the Trinidad regiom .
iie says the mines are unsafe, hot
id generally disagreeable..
According to Mr. Bissett, quite a few
on have been shot by militiamen,
3(1 their bodies secretly interred and . %
) report of the matter made either /
i the authorities or the public .
No Exchange.
The Ladies Auxiliary of the first * ,>5
aptist church will hot have their
eehly exchange on next Saturday but
ill be glad to fill orders for homoado
cahe, pies, bread, eta Leave
-ders with Mrs. A. J. Stone/ Bell
none, or Mrs. M. C. Lough, Consol- >*
iated Phone, 118-4.
THE WEATHER. 4
.J.
. What We Have To-Day And 4.
. What Is In Store For ?
U Us To-Morrow.
- Washington, r>. c., may to. 4?
?For West Virginia: Fair to- $>
night'with frost in mountain dis- -J- >
tricts. Tuesday fair, followed by -I- Jt
showers and warmer in the -?!*
*5* *s* "r*4* "I* "J* ?"

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