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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 19, 1904, Image 1

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WILL FIGHT
IT OUT I
TAKES
THE REPUBLICANS OF ILLINOIS
ARE SETTLING DOWN TO
BUSINESS IN GOOD
SHAPE.
-THEY HAVE AGREED TO HOLD
THREE SESSIONS A DAY UNTIL
THEIR LITTLE DIFFERENCES
ARE SETTLED.
SFRIXGF1ELD, 111., May 19.?The
Republican State convention assemv
-bled shortly after 10 o'clock this
?-o? morning with a settlement of the deadlock
no nearer in sight than it was
eight days ago when the first session
was called to order.
The convention has practically become
a legislative body through the
.agreement entered into by Governor
Tfates and the Lowden and Deneen
forces. " Tlje governor realizing the
strain on the delegates was very great
proposed to the other leaders that
three sessions he held daiiy, beginning
at ID o'clock each morning and
each session lasting through three
calls.
. Adjournment would then be taken
for dinner and on reassembling at 3
P. M., if no choice was made in the
next three ballots, adjournment should
^again be taken until eight P. M., and
so on until a settlement was reach
eCA
general split up in lines occurred
tills morning on a question of procedure
to break the deadlock. Congressman
Fuller offered a resolution
.that after the present session the contention
snspend voting on governor
and proceed to nominate the other
. -officers after which the convention
. ' shall return to the governor. The
oh air man wanted a roll call in the demand
of the Tates and Deneen men.
The- how-tien men In Cook county join-e4
with Deneeii and Yates in voting |
"no" and the resolution was lost by
the overwhelming vote of 301 ayes to
1,201 nayes. The chairman ordered a
roll call on the new nomination for
.governor.
Another proposition by the governor
.that the convention adjourn and let
-the gubernatorial nomination he settled
by a ^Republican primary, to be
Iheld in every county on the same day,
.was not so well received by the leaders.
They say that the Yates proposition
has a strong tone.
Forty-eighth ballot: Yates, ISC; Deneen,
432; Lowden, 397; Hamlin, 111;
Warner, 41.; Sherman, 12; Pierce, 32.
Fortymir.th ballot; Yates, 1ST;
ILowden, *395; Deneen, 391; Hamlin,
.111; Warner 39; Sherman. 42; Pierce,
"32.
The hftieth ballot saw Sherman lose
iilJ m s vulcs.IU J.. 11 ,r I,. > > in ...,.
Pierce. ,Tlie ballot resulted: Yates,
-4SG; Deneen, 431; Lowden, 399; Hamlin,
HS; Warner, 10; Pierce, 32; Sherman,
nothing. After the announce~ment.
of the vote, the convention took
' , .-a recess until three P. M.
queen"
"WILL NOT ATTEND THE CHOPIN
ANNIVERSARY ON ACCOUNT
OF RUMORED UPRISING.
LONDOX, May 19.?Because of the
-rumors of an uprising in Poland in
the early summer Queen Alexandria
Ihas decided not to attend the anniversary
concert on May 20, the day on
which Chopin died. The concert is to
toe held under the auspices of the
Countess of Sutherland at Stafford
House. The Queen fears her presence
at the concert might be interpreted
-as encouragement to the Polish revolutionaries.
Poles in London and elsewhere are
ImoAvn to be most active. Tlicy are
shipping Quantities of arms to Poland
via the Austrian frontier. Court and
diplomatic circles here consider the
situation alarming.
A ?? !? ?2? !? ?S?
' \' -~Sr *s*
;r-5- THE WEATHER. ?.
-"5* v
-^ Clouds Will Go East To-Morrow -J.
-"5*. - / *J*
^5. WASHINGTON, D. C., May
2* 19.?For West Virginia: Show- -J-?
ers to-night. Friday fair except -?
rain in Eastern portion.
"I", ^
[FIT
ALL SUMMER
KIDNAPPED
AMERICAN HAS FALLEN INTC
THE HANDS OF RAISULI MOUNTAINEERS?ANOTHER
INSTANCE
OF LAWLESSNESS.
TiKr.ifn MOROCCO. Mnv 19.?
News reached here to-day that Ion
Perdicaris and Cromwell Varley have
been kidnapped at their home three
miles west of Tangier by a band of
Raisuli mountaineers.
Perdicaris is the richest and most
influential man in Tangier. lie is
an American citizen who studied art
in Paris, London and America. His
father was at one time American consul
at Athens.
Perdicaris is the leading member of
the Sanitary Board at Tangier, which
is composed mainly of foreigners who
are trying to encourage attention to
public health. He has been instrumental
in securing many reforms,
including the betterment of the
prisoners and the reduction of the
practice of maimjng prisoners. He
has gained great power among the
Tangerine masses, so much so that in
many quarters he is called "King of
Tangier."
This popularity has roused the jealousy
of government officials who may
have facilitated the kidnapping. Varley
is an English friend who has been
associated with Perdicaris in several
enterprises.
Varley is the step-son of Perdicaris.
This is hut another instance of Morocco
lawlessness. Such acts are not
astounding, inasmuch as the kidnap
pers of Journalist Harris and the murderers
of the servant of a leading
European traveler at Tangier a year
ago, still s wagger through the Tangier
market place, hae officials dare not
punish them.
WIFE BEATER
Gave' Bond For His Appearance For
Trial Next Saturday.
Yesterday morning a woman came
into Judge Amos' office and swore out
a "warrant for a man for cruelly beating
his wife. The wo.man said that
the wife was not able to come herself,
that she was in bed. The warrant
was issued but was not served until
Dr. Kunst could go and see how serious
the injuries were. He went out
but instead of finding her in bed she
had gone out to do some shopping.
This morning the woman went to
her home to get her clothes and the
man drew a hatchet on her. She came
immediately to Judge Amos' office and
renewed the complaint. Constable
Jones, hearing that the man was going
away on a westbound train, went down
and arrested him. He gave bond for
his appearance for trial next Saturday.
MR. AND MRS. C. E. REED
Delightfully Entertained a Number of
Their Friends Last Night.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Edwin Reed
delightfully entertained a number of
guests at their home on Fairmont avenue
last night. The hours were from
eight to twelve, the entertainment being
in the nature of a musicale, alJ
rtr/ann
tnougll earns aim 11111^11
pastimes enjoyed. Fruit punch was
served at intervals during the evening,
and at eleven o'clock tempting refreshments
consisting of salads, sandwiches,
pickles, olives, almonds, coffee,
cakes , and candy were served in
the dining room. A special car was in
waiting at twelve o'clock to convey
the guests to their homes. The affair
was given in honor of Mrs. Reed's sister,
Mrs. Lackey, of "Wilmington, Del.,
who returns to her home next Monday
after having spent two weeks making
pleasant acquaintances in our city
Mrs. Reed was assisted in her duties
as hostess by Miss Lillian Reed and
Miss Lee Moore, of Washington, D.,C
Mr. and Mrs. Reed have gained an en
viable reputation for lavish hospital
ity .and pleasant anticipations are al
ways awakened by an invitation tc
thelrpre tty home..
BIG COAL
COMPANY
'
HAS PASSED INTO THE HANDS OF y
EASTERN CAPITALISTS AFTER
L A HOT CONTEST.
COL.T7MBLS, Ohio. May 19.?The
Columbus and Hocking Coal and Iron
Company, one of the biggest producers P.
of coal in the Ohio fields, has pa.*is -fi .
into the control of Eastern capital- y
i ists after a contest between Eastern, ^
and Western stockholders, which lias" 4j
been waged at each annual election if
for the past three years. The
York people ~were**Iiea;Ied by E. C. ^
Lathrope and they won over President
. Zeigler and his crowd ot' "Western cop- ^
italists. For j fear of unfairness the
Eastern people had the local oottrr
appoint inspectors for corpo-ation tj
elections. A
2 P
The new board of directors is com- ,
posed of Arthur A. Brownlee, L. C.
Eatlirope. Robert Forsythe, J.itt'e ^
James R. Blake, all of Ne.iv York, and l
ir. T. Einn and Al. Thurman, Henry ^
Gumbie, Nathan Gumble and C. M ^
\ oornees. or uoiudiuus. 1 :ie uuctiuio ^
elected these otficers: President, A- A. c,
Brownlee; Vice-President. L?. C. L-a*h- ,f.
rope; Secretary-Treasurer. A. L. Tli tr j.
man.
This is a $7,000,000 corporation.
WARREPORTS t
; OF ALL KINDS HAVE BEEN COMING
IN TO-DAY?TWO JAPAN- <
ESE BATTLESHIPS LOST J
MONDAY . j
ivS
CHEEFOO, China, Jla; 10.?Rue- l
snail refugees lrora Haley report that ]
Japanese fleet suffered severely dur- '
ing the recent operations before Port
Arthur and Dalny.
They say that during a bombard- j(
ment of Port Arthur on Monday the >(
' battleship Skiashima and the c-uiser f?,
' Asama struck, mines and sank. v
The crew of the battleship, number gj
ing 750 men. the refugees report were
nearly all lost. The Asama sank
. lowly and other men were saved, j
The refugees also report the battleship
Fiju struck a mine and was se
verely damaged.
The Russian Consul has a telegram' fl
from Dalny conveying the rumor that
' two Jananese battleships were lost at
Port Arthur on Monday. A
No confirmation of the Russian re- '
ports have reached here.
There is a bejief that the Russians
have magnified the reports of the sink1
ing of the Jax>anese cruiser Miyalto in
Kerr-Bay Dalny into a serious Japan M
ese reverse. ei
The refugees state that Russian tor- oi
pedo boats went oiit to rescue the .Jap- ci
anese on the sinking vessels, but Jnp- ni
anese reinforcements came up at the it'
moment, and they were forced < ? re tl
tire. One of the lireships sunk in the c:
Harbor, they say has been removed, ti
thus reopening the passing to the
harbor, though it is stiJl dangerous to vi
attempt a passage. The fleet has been w
ordered to remain inside until the ar al
rival of the Admiral. tc
Ammunition Has Disappeared.
BIRMINGHAM, Eng., May 19.?The ai
IJost is informed hy a military author- A
ity who is at present in Odessa that E
there is a great commotion at Russian K
headquarters over the discovery that K
the various reserves of ammunition Jkept
at Kherson'-and .other' nearby F
places, representing 50,000,000 rounds, -J.
have either completely disappeared or
are so worthless that practically none
is available for use. A private in e
quiry into the matter is proceeding,
Will Pass the Dardanelles. C
r nvnr,^ n.... m -r 1,A rmisrnnti
nople covresjiondent of the Central ei
News wires that the whole of the Rns- c<
sian Black Sea fleet has heen ordered w
to he held on a complete footing f" 01
August 1. In the meanwhile, the fleet aj
is divided into two squadrons which n<
are executing a scries of j?ractical ev- tt
olutions in the Crimean waters. w
It is reported, adds the correspond- n,
eat, that an arrangement has been ar- m
lived at whereby Turkey will all-w tc
the fleet to pass through the Dardanelles
for service in the far East ai
? " tl
Little Child Dead. c<
Harold, the little child of Mr. and
' Mrs. J. C. Patterson, whose Illness
; we have mentioned several times,
died this morning at 10:30. The
> child's su&'ering has been unusual for S
!; its age, and its sickness has lasted C
. for nearly four weeks. It will be ci
- burled to-morrow afternoon in Wood- pi
- lawn cemetery. n
, 8<
> Hon. E. M. Show-alter came in on tl
46 to-day. oi
FACE SAVED
IY CONSTABLE JONES?THE C
CAGO ART GALLERY MAN HAi
TO PAY BACK THE TEN
DOLLARS AND CAME
NEAR GETTING HIS
PHYSIOGNOMY
SPOILED.
Roy Lr.wson, the agent for the C
aso Art Gallery who Kept the mo;
t Mrs. Deein. was arrested ?
rought before Judge Bennington t
aiming. Mrs. Deets had given li
so pictures to enlarge, but \vt
ley vyere broughr around site ciai .<
\/nr ?ir?r irr?r?il oTO / i thof i
ould not take them* She Pnaliy
ided to take one of them and pay i
pilars on it now. and tha remain*
:tcr. She savo the man ten d-.'l
nd he then -decided that he wo
the hie pay for both of the pictni
e took the money and left hoIctures.
She came to town and got a warn
>r him and he v;as brought ir. t
orning. Judge Bennington ordei
itr. to pay back the money and ;
jsts or pay ten dollars fine and cot
e paid her money bark and \v.to i
ilssed. During the settlement
tiled the woman's father a 11a-. a
is face was saved only by Consta
mes' timely Interference.
This may be a lesson to some of 1
;c-nts who try to make women tc
ictures or pay fcr things whe i 11:
p not want .to do sa. These agei
ever do such things hen there :
ly men around.
SEEGEORGE
Dme Wag Took Advantage of 1
Mayor's Absence and Advertisec
the Cane Rack Outfit For
Rent.
The cane rack is still stand ins
?lferson s'reet, hut the canes i
one. This morning a sign, was lor
ailed to the stand which had bt
ut there by some miscreant, 'J
gn reads: "For rent. Mayor Kinst
ambling joint. Closed out by S':
i Jolliff. See George!" It is i
notvn why the stand has not bt
?moved.
(1ANNINGT0N LADIE
RE VISITING FAIRMONT TO-D
kND ALL ARE ENJOYING THEI
SELVES?THEY WILL GO
HOME TO-NIGHT.
The Ladies' Aid Society of the !m
:. E. church, of this city, is to-c
rtertaining the Ladies' Aid Soci<
f the Mannington M. E. church,
-otvd of nineteen came down t
oming. They were served w
inch nt the church, and at o'eb
ley went on a trolley ride. The n
ir. 23, was chartered, and a pleas;
rr.e was spent.
Since their return they have lit
siting the ne.v Cook's Hospital, at'
hicli they will he served with dim
i the church, and will return ho:
i-night.
Those present from Manning!
e: Mesdarhes A. W. Prichard, Jc
tkinson, F. E. Fttrbee, F. ,R. Stev.'t
dgar Phillips. Edgar Conaway, J.
oen, T. F. Koen, D. J. Beer, Bt
eplar, O. W. Crosier, M. J. Ann
W. Craker. James Hawker, J.
uller, M. F. Coleman, G. E. Weil
L. Stewart and C. E. JolliiXe.
The B. & O. and the Bridge.
ditors West' Virginian:
The Baltimore and Ohio Railrc
ompany still has one of the wo
istacles to navigation known to i
-men. and moreover allows this
;edingly dangerous structure to
ithout lights of any description, ei
i the darkest nights. The Baltim<
id Ohio is famous for its unwilli
ass to allow competition of any
ire to encroach upon its preserithout
a bitter struggle, yet the m
ir in which it contemptously igno
umc:pai anci governraem siaiuies
i put it mildly, a little arrogant.
We can see no other reason for i
isence of the aforementioned Ugh
lan to impede the progress of tb
jmpstitors, the steamboats.
Riverman
Has Bought Circus Outfit.
Doc Thomas, owner of the Natio
toclc Company, has bought out
oughanour & Frazee vaudeville <
is and will combine the two. "1
roperty will be brought here, ant
bw company will be organized ?
int out. It is the intention to mi
lie new. show better than either of i
Id ones.
Xw , ' I ?.
> DEMOCRATS '
; FIGHT i
PO
| LOVE FEAST
Ills j
'""'was the republican convenJ1''*
j tion in california?they
j are very rare these
DAYS IN POLITICAL
MEETINGS.
wo .
:,er SAX FRANCISCO, ,CaI., May IP.?
d' "" FJxcept for one litrle stir (n tlic prouH!
ceeilings. the Republican. State Con es.
vemlon. held last night, was a perfect
;',e love feast. It has been kupwrt fo'months
past that President Roosevelt
would set the unanimous indorsement
- IS of the convention, and last nlglit's ae'l'cl
tion In ...is respect was a mere lormnl' 'lt
ity. Judge Burnett., of Santa Rosa,
;ls- chairman of the convention, wcrjed
!'s" the feelings of the body in a long
ho ettlogy of the President. The main
nt' business of the meeting tvas tin acll1''
tion of delegates at large to the National
convention. Those elected are:
Governor Pardee. J. W. McKinley. of
Los Angeles, and George A. Kiilght
le-v and Col. .John D. Sprecels, of San
",s Francisco. The one little note of fricire
tion was the announcement of Slate
Senator Bulla, of Los Angeles, as an
independent candidate for delegate.
! Bulla was a prominent cantTidate for
Governor and was once considered
lor the TJ. S. Senatorfiliip. Senator
Bulla's candidacy had hut. slight supihe
P?rtKINGMONT
on
1:0 PEOPLE SAW THE FIRST STEAMlt,d
BOAT NEAR THEIR VILLAGE
cu THIS MORNING?EQUALITY
Jiff - vqlUB^ IS OW-TlWJSJRSaER
*"s TO-DAY.
ier- ___
not This morning saw a steamboat
"en farther up the tributaries of the Monongahela
than ever before. Pilot
Axton took the Beauty with the
tow .>anarl, up mo Tygart's Valley
,r?J river to KIngniont. There is no account
of any steamer being close to
AV that place before.
VI- The Woman's Political Equality
Club have the boat for the day, and
as the water is too high to allow the
boat to go under the P., M. and P.
rst bridge a trip up the river was underlay
taken. Although the river Is full of
ety obstacles, Axton piloted the boats up,
A turned and made the return trip with*
his out accident.
1th The people around Kingmont be:ck
came greatly excited and throw their
ew hats into the air. One man about
ant seven feet tail was last seen going
over the hill, stepping at least ten
ten feet at a time. The excitement
tor spread even to the Wabash mules,
ler which turned their abnormal auricular
etc appendages toward the river.
This afternoon the club Is floating
ton around near the city, and this evening
lin it will go on another excursion,
irt.
*" William Levelle Dead.
'lie
i \viiliam I.evelle died at the City
j Hospital this morning at 12:15 o'clock,
e' of consumption. His deaLh had been
' expected for several days. It has been
known for some time that lie could
I * 1 ?.? 1 +A -v,-.
City Hospital about a week ago.
William Levelle was born ?.lay 5,
'ar' 1SGS. He was the son of Robert and
1st Sarah Develle. who died a number of
1V" years ago. He is survived l>y one
ex" brother, Robert, who lives at i'iedmont.
Four sisters and two brothers
en preceded --..a to the grave. He was
-ro the nephew of John, Jerry, William
r's" and the late Morgan Levelle, and of
Qa S. W. Hall.
les q.j)e funeral services will be conal*"
ducted to-morrow afternoon at two
rc:' o'clock, at the Diamond Street M. E.
's' Church, by Rev. O. u. King. Interment
will be made in Maple Grove
'C'? cemetery. Undertaker Musgrave will
ltf have charge of the remains.
elr Mr. Lovelle was an honest, upright
man, and was a friend to all who
know him. He knew that he could
not live long and was resigned to his
nal fate"
the
2ir- Jlr. and Mrs. W. T. Baker and grandee
son, Koy Baker, of Pawpaw district,
I a were pleasant callers at our office tomd
day. .y||?fg
the E. F. Hartley\ls at Clarksburg on
business. *>
" 1
ro
ON NEW
LiTICAL LINES
! f
OLD ISSUES AND LEADERS IN THE BACKGROUND,
AND NEW POLICIES
INAUGURATED.
TO BE VIOLENT TARIFF AT- .
TACKS?NEITHER WILL CORPORATIONS
BE
j ANTAGONIZED BY CRY AGAINST
THE TRUSTS ALL HINGES
ON PARKER.
11 ii be true that "imitation la the
sincerest battery," then the Democrat lc
party is preparing to pay a high
compliment to the Republican party.
Tills latter may be a somewhat pro- s
rifoture statement, since Us accuracy
depouds largely upon-whether or- not
Judge Alton J>. Darker, of Mew York,
is the Democratic nominee.
That lie will bo the candidate seems
almost certain, however, so certain
that some ot his more ardent support- s .
ers here are willing to bet that he
iwill be nominated on the first ballot
at. St. jLojis next July.. If-their cents
donee proves to bo well grounded and.
the Nov.- Yorker Is pitted against Theodore
Roosevelt in ho- coming Presidential
contest, then it seems safe to
say that Republicans may look forward
to a campaign conducted so far as
the Democratic cud of it is concerned,;
uiran entirely -different linos
tlio.se of i-Silti Ulld 1900.
It Is an old Democratic trick to try
and 'shift the cut" on the Republicans
in the Presidential political game.
Their old issues having been repudiated
by the people, a new sot of leaders,
headed by William J; Bryan, and
others of his Btrlpe, sprang free sliver
at the ratio ot its to ? in iwu, o.un
added antl-expaosion to. lt la .1900.
Neither was a success, and now the
conservative following . are coming
again to the front, and are laying
tlielr plans upon 'a wholly different
basis. While there Is a general sentiment
for this In the party, most notably,
however, in the East and South,
the element which has Its policies and
camjiaign most definitely mapped outis
that , which Ib behind the candidacy
of Judge Parker. Should It win
out at St. Lottla, the Democratic campaign
for the Presidency is to take
on entirely new aspects from those
which characterized the contests in -.-v;
1S92, 1896 and 1900.
No Attack on the Tariff.
There are to be no violent attacks
upon the tariff, as in 1S92, no wild and
untenable declarations on the monetary
question ao in 1896 and 1900, "no
heated denunciations of' expansion as
in tne latter campaign. The Democracy
is to pose as the party of conservatism.
Of course, there are alleged %
evils of Republican policies and government
which are to be corrected, but ^
everything in that direction is to be *' -,*|||
done gently indeed. . There are to
be 110 sudden and radical departures
from present conditions; nothing that
.vill rob tile financial and busiuessTnterests
of confidence, nothing that wili
unsettle, if not paralize. trade and .
commerce.
Doubtless there will be a platform
demand for a revision of the tariff,
but it will not be a demand tor anything
approximating to or hinting-at.
in the remotest degree, that sacred
tenet of Democracy, free trade. The ,11
monetary question may call for some
perfunctory declarations, Jiut . with' . . '.-vfl
free silver dropped entirely, and that
menace to finance removed, the public
will not inquire into them too
The United States having faithfully
kept its solemn pledge and set.Cuba
on its feet as an independent republic;
the wisdom of the acquisition of Forto
Rico being no longer doubted in view
of our undertaking to construct the
Panama canal, and the island being
so satisfactorily governed that not a
ripple of dissatisfaction manifests A
itself, and affairs in the Philippines
being so orderly and fairly well settin,1
tvin stiriIf there ever was one.
has been largelytahenout of the antiexpansion
cry. There will doubtless
bo a demand for Philippines self-government?based,
beyond a peradventure,
upon that shining principle of
Democracy that the natives of the archipelago
should be given all the 31
rights of self-government while a col- -25
ored man in the South should not be
allowed to vote?but it will hardlyfggCgjjS
(Continued on dth page.)

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