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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, May 21, 1904, Image 1

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AWFUL DE i
STRUCTION]
- CAUSED BY RAGING ELOODS?SEV- j
EHAL TOWNS ARE UNDER
WATER, AND BRIDGES -j
HAVE BEEN SWEPT
. AWAY.
f . DENVER, Colo., May 21?Eight
' Tives are known to have been iost in
Colorado and "Wyoming in raging ^
floods that were started by cloudbursts j
.and near Cheyenne many persons are ^
missing- Scores of other people are
in; danger and can hardly escape if J _
I.:.-, . m-iMtinn rpsArvoir- in the I
4-ia.tS Ui-3 " -i . . __.
mountains yields to ttie pressure/and t,
bursts. ' a
1 Immense damage was done in Col-orado
along the Cache" La Poudre riv- ^
sr. The dam at Lake Livingston gave a
way before the flood. The towns of a
Livermore. La Porte, Wellington and
part of Fori; Collins are under five g
- feet of water. .
Five iron bridges and two railway
bridges have been swept away and
miles of the Colorado Southern Railway
track are washed out. The Union g
Pacific tracks are also badly damaged.
Thousands of acres of ranch and farm
land are inundated and a great many ^
-cattle have been drowned. Several 0
-other streams are threatening to overSow
hecause of the rains.
FARMER I
t)
ARMED WITH A SHOTGUN, STOOD b
GUARD OVER A MAN HE HAD V
SHOT UNTIL OFFICERS S
* D an/en b
/-v r?- rvi v b. %-r
* O
GREEJsCASTLE, Intl., May 21.? e
-Armed! with a shotgun and standing
over the body of an unknown man, n
Roscoe Havens, a farmer, waited for ?
^several hours for the arrival of Dep- ^
aty Sheriff Brazier, to whom he' sent *"
~ word that he wished to *be taken into lj
^custody. Havens was arrested and
.brought to this city? ''VfTfen questioned" 'r'
be said that he had been robbed of a a
rsnm of money, and that yesterday he 11
thought that the man and his compan- ''
ion, whom he found in a box car. were 11
the robbers. An envelope bearing the T
name of Miss Louise Butler, Warren, a
Pa, found in the dead man's pocket, a
^nd the tailor's trademark on the s
' clothing are the only clews to the iden- 15
ttity o? the dead Body. ]>
FLOATER FOUND Z
iSadly Decomposed Body Buried With- tj
;: \ out Being Identified. ^
PAKKERSBURG, W. Ta., May 21.? U
A badlv decomposed body of a man ?
' I <~r
was found ten miles below here last j ?
might.. The coroner to-day found noth- =
ing to indicate who the man had been
-and his jury rendered a verdict that ^
"the unknown man came to his death
by drowning. He was evidently a ^
working man and was buried where
found- 11
_ v
W. "V. U< Was Third.
DELAWARE. Ohio, May 21.?The 11
; ;seventh annual contest of the Central
Oratorical League took place here last .
j might. Ohio Wesley won first prize. 1
b -Ohio State second. University of West
I" Virginia, third. Governor Herriclc
presided.
f ;
|i May Change Hands. "
). . The Hartley Hotel, so sayetli report,
H is hovering on me brink of changing '
owners. A prominent real estate ?
man is engineering the deal. a
i 1<
Laid to Rest.
The. funeral of Mrs. Sophia Shackle- s
" ford, who died at Forlcsburg Tliurs-day,
took place this afternoon at two f
o'clock. She was buried in Mt. Zion 1
cemetery.
This- Hon. El dr id Be Carter, of Win- j_
field district, made Fairmont a visit ,
this morning. v '
-b -i- * ~ *3*
4- a
?J. HEAVY LOSSES SUSTAINED. .L t
-J. PARIS. May 21.?La Temps -L
, ?? has a'dispatch from St. Peters- ?
?J. burg stating that General Sto??
esse! reports that the Russians I:
J. have made a successful sortie ?
; "J? from PoTt Arthur, and in a clash {. ?
j -with Japanese, forced the latter C
?5? iS. retreat. The Japanese casual- {|pfe?i?
ties are said to have been 1,000,
?5? and those of the Russians about -J4
1.500. t
.4^>?* >S* 4* jjj? ?i? ?J? ?? *5", '
ALARMING j
iRE CONDITIONS ON THE GREAT
LAKES?THE TIE-UP W!!_L
HAVE GREATER. EFFECT
THAN THE ANTHRACITE
COAL STRIKE.
"HE TOTAL FALLING OFF IN THE
GRAIN SHIPMENTS FOR THE
MONTH OF MAY IS
SO.COC.OOO BUSHELS.,
BUFFALO. X. v.. May 21.?By the
iockade of all traffic on the Great
-akcp, Buffalo suffers a tremendous
>3S. .
The entire country, more especially
he Cast, it is said by shippers here,
"ill he more "disastrously . affected by
he tie-up than resulted from the great
nthracite coal strike. Shippers are
ounting on the continuation of the
lo'ckade during the summer. The I
ighway of the trade between West
nd East is practically closed. The
moke of a lumber craft or a tramp
teamer is occasionally seen, but rliat
> all. In the granaries of the West
lillions of bushels of cereals are
toreil that should have been deliver!
d in the East long ago, and the Lake
uperior miiies are turning out iron
re that the furnaces of the East will
eed by and by, but won't be able to
et while hundreds of thousands of
jns of coal are held up either at the
lines or at coal shopping ports. If
lie supply of iron ore is shut off blast
.irnaces must close, and if the furaces
shut down steel plants and founries
cannot continue operations,
.nd something akin to a famine is
ireateued unless the millions of
usliels of cereals are moving from the
rest and Northwest. If Western
ranaries are not emptied what is to'
e done with the crop of wheat, corn,
ats, barley and rye now being raisd?
This port is the outlet for the comlerce
of -the West. All, or nearly all
f it, flow's through here on its way
iast. It is estimated by Secretary F.
Coward Mason, of the Buffalo Chamer
of Commerce, that this city, is
jsing $15,000 in cash every day by
eaaou-of?the -blockade- and jit isj not'
- ?ml, ^
u unreasonable esimiait;. j. ue ailuaon
here is rendered still more serious
y reason of the fact that a strike
as shut down the grain elevators,
he strike of the masters and pilots
nd the decision of the trunk lines
nd the Lake Carriers' Association to
Ltspend all Lake traffic has held Lake
oats here as effectually as if they had
een hard and fast aground.' Many of
nem are loaded with coal. It is esmated
that there are on board ship
1 this port 150,000 tons of coal.
Inasmuch as there are practically
o shipments of grain arriving here,
le total falling off for the month of
lay, compared with the same period
ist year, will he in the neighborhood,
f 30,000,000 bushels. What little
rain is being moved by Lake, is now
cing over the Georgian Bay route.
One of the serious features of the |
Stoppage of Lake traffic is the fact j
tat millions of bushels of grain have I
een sold by Buffalo men and other j
ealers for delivery in the East, and 1
cannot be delivered. Idleness preails
along the water front of Buffalo.
Thousands of men who make their
ving handling grain, ore, coal and
ackage freight have nothing to do.
'he wage cut off of these will be desitution
along the water front soon,
ironrtv manv families are suffering.
I
t
In a Critical Condition.
BUFFALO, May 21.?Major Theoore
A. Bingham, formerly superinsndent
of buildings and grounds at
lie "White Mouse, lies in a critical
ondition in Buffalo General Hospital
s the result, of the amputation of his
fft leg yesterday afternoon. Late
ist night the surgeons at the Hospital
tated that he has only an even chance
or life and that complications may
et in at any lime tvliich tvoukl minmize
liis chance of recovery:
Professor Armstrong Here.
All who have ever heard Proles so r
t. A. Armstrong, well know what a
reat is In store for those who can go
o hear him to-morrow, morning and
vening, at the M. E. Church. His
Bible Stories" is exceptionally fine
s he has made a special study along
his line.
Died.
An infant child, the daughter of
saac Wilson, in the First ward, died
n Thursday evening from" an attack
f croup. Interment to-day at Maple
trove cemetery.
f To Wed.
A marriage license has been Issued
o William Taux, 22, and Rebecca Colins,
2G.
"RACE
SUICIDE"
WAS A WARM SUBJECT BEFORE
THE GENERAL. FEDERATION
OF WOMEN'S CLUBS
YESTERDAY.
WOMEN PROTESTED AUDIBLY
AGAINST THE SENTIMENT OF
MORE WIVES. MORE MOTHERS
AND MORE CHILDREN.
ST. TOUIS. Mo., May 21.?Presif
dent Roosevelt's question of race suicide.
raised in the convention of tlie
General Federation of Women's Clubs
Friday, as- an argument against "Unionization"
of the working women of
America, v.-as met by jeers and laughter.
Hal 1' the women In the great hall
made audible protests against the plea
for more wives, more mouiers, ui
more children. This spectacle was
the climax of a hitter debate between
the radical element in the convention
which stands for suffrage, women's
trades' unions, and woman industrialism,
and the conservative element,
which holds that woman's sphere is
confined to the four walls of home.
The debate which led to this, followed
a plea by Mrs.- A. F. Perkins,
of Ohio, to women to go back to their
homes and unionize cooks, servant
girls, seamstresses, hairdressers and
every woman with whom they come
in contact.
Before Mrs. Perkins had resumed
her seat a dozen women belonging to
the conservative faction were clamoring
for the floor. Mrs. Frederick Nathan,
of New York, the acting chairman,
recognized Mrs. W. S. Perkins,
of Kentucky.
"The organizing of women is not
half so important as the education of
women for a special sphere of. life,"
cried Mrs. Perkins at the top of her
voice. "God created women for one
thing, .that is to make the home. Not
one of these women who are earning
$5 a week in department stores and
factories is qualified to make-a home.
Miss Deiss, a radical, of Pennsylvania.
was recognized next. She urged
that woman's economical existence
depended upon her organized strength.
Miss Aiken, of Indian Territory, said:
"What we wain is more wives, better
wives. What the nation needs is more
mothers, more children (laughter) and
schools to educate these children to
become home-makers, wives and mothers
of high ideals. The cry of race
suicide must he heard. It is a warning
cry, vastly more important than
the cry to unionize."
The fight was getting warm, au<l the
chairman, to avert more bitter words,
closed the debate with the gavel.
HUNDRED BAR-,
_REL WELL
Came In on Gray's Run?is Creating
Considerable Excitement.
Well Ko. 2, on Gray's run, the property
of William Parrisli, came in at
about 100 barrels ])er day. Two other
wells have been located near there.
The well caused a good deal of excitement
as there is no other well
near there.
Mannington Boy In Fairmont.
Dr. L. W. Ice, D. D. S-. has located
in Fairmont and opened dental parlors
in the Yost building. Dr. Ice is
a three year graduate of the Dental
College of the Ohio State University
or toiumous, UlUl , Jias irciao'.u
earned his degree with credit. He is
therefore intelligently qualified to perform
his work in the most scientific
and modern systems employed in dentistry.
He is a son of Dr. Ice, physician
and surgeon of this city.?Advocate.
We are glad to welcome Dr. Ice to
our town, and we wish him abundant
success in his profession.
Has Discovered a Tenor.
MTJNCIE, Ind., May 21.?Mme. Schuman-Heink
has discovered a fine tenor
in 'Orville Harold and will provide for
his musical education in Germany.
She heard his voice accidentally in
A, oanctlan ntiirra ChOil'. He
Ulc j'nai, uui ......... VUha. .?
drives a wagon for a Muncie ColHn
company, has a wife and three children
and is 26 years old.
Fell From Derrick.
SISTERS VILLE, W. Va? May 20.?
James Latshaw, of this city, fell from
the top of an eighty-foot derrick in
I Roane county county yesterday and
was.instantly killed. ^ ?
'FAIRMONT
i TEAM WON
i ?
BY A SCORE OF NINETEEN TO
NINE IN THE BASKET BALL
CONTEST WITH CLARKSBURG.
| RETURN GAME WILL BE PLAYED
IN THE HOME "GYM" NEXT
FRIDAY NIGHT.
Outclassed at every point was the
'Clarksburg Y. .11. C. A. Basket Ball
team by the Fairmont boys in the new
gymnasium of the -Clarksburg Association.
Nineteen to 9 was the score at
the close of the two 20 minute
halves. Fairmont made 10> of the 19
points by goals'from field throws,
while four.of the Clarksburg nine were
made in this way.
"Fritz" Hawley, the son of the Y.
II. C. A. Secretary, scored l!i of the
points made on his side, and seemed
:to find the goal whenever he went af- :
tor it. Ice Poling, who was center
nml ranrninetl the Coal City five, im- :
proved all chanes eon)ins his way. j
and Meredith, as guard, put a damper i
on the aspirations of Clarksburg !
sphere tossers whenever the leather
got tvitliin his reach. Crawford, as
forward, lifted two pretty ones in rapid
succession into the basket in the
second half which had the effect of
cooling the ardor of the home team
rooters.
But once during the same was the
Clarksburg team ahead, and that was
at the very beginning, before the Fairmont.
boys had acquainted themselves
with the situation of a larger gymnasium
than they have beeti accustomed
to, and after 1 .ay 111 an had tied the
score by a dexterous field throw. The
Clarksburg fellows never caught their
opponents again. Stewart, in the second
half, went ni as guard and few
passed him into the enemy's territory.
The game though quick and -sharply
-fought, was very clean and conspicuously
clear of roughness or wrangling.
..Harry. Williamson, of Fairmont, was
burg, official scorer.
The line up was as follows:
Fairmont Clarksburg
Crawford guard Kane.
Layman & Stewart. . guard... . Davis
Poling center Connor
Hawley . ... forward ... . L.aubcnstein
Meredith ....forward Thompson
Field Throws: Haw ley 5. Crawford
2, Layman 1, fonnur 1 and Thompson
1.
An audience taxing the capacity
of the space for spectators, and with
a large springling of the fair sex, eagerly
watched every contested point of
the game.
Next Friday in the Fairmont "gym"
the return game will he "pulled off"
and the Clarksburg boys hope to
change the result.
FIVE RECAPTURED
f
Escaped Fayette County Prisoners
Have Been Retaken.
CHARLESTON, W. Va., May 21.?
Seven prisoners of Fayette county
who were out working on the roads,
nvornnwererl the guard the other day
! and made their escape, through the
i carelessness of that official,
j Since then five of the seven have
been recaptured, including an ex-convict
named Burton, who was the ring
leader in the escape:
Three Men Arrested.
B. & O. Officer Stone arrested three
men for riding a freight yesterday.
They were William Riley, Floyd Morris
and Mick Phillips. This morning
they were brought before Justice Bennington
and fined five dollars each.
The trio had seventy cents. They were
sent to jail. Riley and Morris are
from Montana Mines and Phillips is
supjjosed to he an agitator from Ohio.
He is Supposed to nave oeen nine >.<j
get the miners in this region to go
there.
Mrs. Robert B. Reed Dead.
Sarah A., wife of Robert B. Reed,
died at her home In Barnsvilie yesterday
afternoon of grippe. Mrs. Reed
was about 00 years of age. Her husband
is an employe of the Fairmont
Coal Company. Her remains will be
taken to Gordon Church, Preston
county, for burial.
Surveying Coal Lands.
County Surveyor L. H. Wilcox has
just finished, surveying 4.000 acres of
coal in Winfteld district for J. M. Guffey.
This completes the survey of a
field of about 100,000 acres in that part
of the county. , ...
j PRAISE
I roa KANN1NGTON NEIGHBORS IS
J EXPRESSED BY MODERN WOODMEN
OF OUR CITY, WHO
VISITED THEM EAST
NIGHT.The
members of the NIodern vVcod
men of America, who went lo Man
nin;-;ton last evening- to initiate a clast
into that order, returned home this
morning 0:1 No. 8. About iifi went
from this place. They were: Walter
Green lief. Charles Hawkins, Chester
Powell. Karl Hawkins. Lester Powell,
Floyd Hawkins. T. A. flail. Nicholas
Linger. Fitzhugh Fast, llyron Linger.
Ray Smith. George Denhain, Claude
Fleming.- O. Davidson, G. D. Fields.
Clark Hildebrand, Creed Jranldnberry,
Arlington Dent. Clarence Lcvqile. I,
1.. .Moore. .7. E. Downs, S. J. Rector,
French Barnes. Bert Hail. Shaw,
Summers, Weiso and others.
' A class of 52 was taken into the or
j der. after which a banquet was held
! for the. visiting neighbors. The ban
? .-** ,1 ^v til/-* tml of ihia T,n<
dies' Auxiliary. Ail report an excellent
time and have words of praise
foi their Marinington nciglihgrs.
? ? ? v?> V .? _ _ ' * *
1 BAND CONCERTS f
-i* -2.J.
JUNKINS' BAND. .J-2
*i"
Watson Hotel Corner, 7:30 P. M.
V V
?J? l.?a Dark Secret?(Grinding
A Two Step.) Frank Panella.
a. 2.-.Vied ley Overture ? Harvest *-JDays.
Harry Von Tilzer. - *
f. ?Joy to the World. I3arnhouso. -J?
I* (Grand Sacred Potpourri.) .J.
>]. 1?Overture?I.ii Croix De Jerusalem.
M. Uleger. .J.
A 5?Alagazaro?Two Step. Abe
?J? Holzmann. j
A C?Medley?Pictures of the Past. J.
A Coffin.
.t 7?March?Gloria. F. H. Losey. .J.
-2- -2A*
A. ?J. A- A .J*
v^.'- >. r-.' .V.
4- GREATER FAIRMONT BAND.
-2- v
|? Main Street Stand. 7:30 P. M. ?*
-2- v
J- i?March?Waklmere. Hosey. v
7. 2?Overture ? Bohemian Girl. ABalfe.
A*
y?Indian March ? Toultawa. A
.J. Story. .J.
A 4?Concert Waltz?Wedding' ol ?
J. [tie winus. nan.
?. 5?Polly Prim ? Characteristic
March. Henry. -~A
C?Medley Overture?New York -J4
By Electric Light. De Witt. 4 J.
7?March?Fort Omaha. Far- -J.
rar. -J.1
(F. J. Nelson, Director.) -J.
-J- "V"
' v v- -! *J* -I- -I- -I- -I* v -I* -JALL
CONVICTED
MOORE SOYS GO TO THE PENITENTIARY?TY^O
OF THEM
FOR LIFE.
\\ jlib 1 Ui\ > \ \ . V tli, ?>1 HJf ? -l ?
jury in the felony ease against. Oley,
Hanse and Robert Moore, charged
with the murder of Benjamin Edgar,
at Cleveland, Webster county, last August.
rendered a verdict of first degree
murder against Oley and Robert,
the older boys, ffnd recommended life
confinement in the penitentiary. They
rendered a second degree verdict
against Hanse, aged IS, and Judge
Bennett fixed his punishment at eighteen
years' imprisonment.
The boys planned the murder liecause
Edgar raised objection to their
beeping company with his daughtersInjured
Frog Hunter Better.
MANKiN'GTON, May 21.?John Furbee,
the young son of Mrs. L.. C. Furbee,
who mistook his heel for a frog
while hunting amphibious animals a
few days ago and put a bullet through
the hind end of his foot, is rapidly recovering
and will soon be able to
throw away his crutches.
Zinn-Springer.
Mr. Wiliam Zinn, o? the First ward,
and Miss Alice Springer, of Union district,
were united in marriage at the
bride's home on Thursday evening by
Rev. O. D. King.
i Will Make Two Trips To-Day.
! The "Beauty" did not leave her
| wharf yesterday oil account of the misj
erable weather. She 'will make two
a nice day Sunday, the boat
luRC'^S
j MAY UNITE?METHODiST P ROTEST
AN TS, UNITED BRETHREN
i AND CONGREGATIONALISTS
ARE SEEKING
WA.SMINt"! OX. 1>. C\, May 21.?In
! the opinion of churchmen generally. the
quadrennial conference oi: the
Methodist Prolostant Church, now' ih-v.. AWkagjj
session here, will probably result !?. | ^y?|?|
the :->!< ? . si-fu) working '>ut of a plan
; -t il\.- iniiih-ati.jii of that church with
She Unite}! Breihren and CongregationSonuiocnt
among the leaders oE the '
r?n.ttfiaBtanntv nrfi 11na n i m K
ihi- propm-ed amlgarauntm unci tht>
only tiling necessary is to reconcile
the views cf n-.e three"denominations
in regard, to tho matter, of organizaKadi
<t sijo three denominations
has a different form of church gov
iii lln I lifted Brethren, is> pre- '
, sided over 'by the bishops; the Congregailonalists
hut e no general head, and
i lie .Methodist Protestants nru gorometl
by the general con ference ill which'
the clergy and the laity are equally
represented. Although it is expected
that the negotiations towards umalga
ntailou may require several years',
there is little doubt that tlirue denominations.
the Jlrst; authoritative aetion
on the part of the Methodist i;
Protestants will be when the present
conference receives the report of President
Tubs, and his colleagues, which 'JSfl
will probably he early next week.
The question will then have to he
discussed l?y the National Convention :
of the CongrogatlonaUats and by the
general conference of the United , "i||
Brethren. President. Tagg to-day appointed
the various working commit- o
toes of the conference and the discus-"
sieu of the routine work began.
BASE BALL^
OPENS MAY 29-30?FIRST GAME IS
WITH BELL.AIRE, OHIO, TEAM.
. PRACTICE GAME NEXT
SATURDAY.
Manager Slack, of the Ball team,
wired catgher Tom Irvin, now with
I.afayette College, Easton, Pa,, with,
a view of securing him' for the local
club. Murphy and Slack fire alter no
second-raters or lias-beens. ' They are
going to put the best team the town
lias ever seen in the field this yeatV
The season opens hero May 29 and. w'"'in,
with the strong Bellaire, - Ohio
team One of the earliest games booked
is with Znnesville.
Charlie Wayman, who has :signed
with Fairmont, came in from Morgantown
this morning. Wayman i- in. MI
fine shape, his work with the University
patting; him in first-class physical
condition. * ' 'i
"Shorty" Beam will need more work
at the start than any of the local men
on the ream. .Meiin has taken on considerable
weight this last winter, but. ,
a few of these warm days will put him
in his old time form.
Bryson, the other member of the
local trio, .says he is in best possible
shape, and he loOKs
A practice game will be played next
Saturday between, the professionals
and a, team composed of the best local
"Poose" Fleming, the Fairmont boy sf|
with Waynesburg College, defeated
Westminister yesterday by a score of
to 2. He struck out six men.
Equality Club Met.
The Women's Political EqualityClub
met at the home of Mrs. C. B.
Fleming, in the Fifth ward, last night.
A very interesting meeting was held.
The local club is urging the establish.ment
of clubs throughout the State.
A salaried representative will be sent
out soon for this purpose.
^ ? .. .. ?
.? The Sun Will Shine To-Morrow.
?
4. WASHINGTON, May 2J.-- .... 4.
night and Sunday;. colder io- ?r
night in the eastern. portion, 5

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